Skip to Content
Notice

Identification Of Priority Data Needs for Six Priority Hazardous Substances

Action

Request For Public Comments On The Identification Of Priority Data Needs For Six Priority Hazardous Substances And An Ongoing Call For Voluntary Research Proposals.

Summary

This notice makes available for public comment the priority data needs for six priority hazardous substances (see Table 1) as part of the continuing development and implementation of the ATSDR Substance-Specific Applied Research Program (SSARP). The notice also serves as a continuous call for voluntary research proposals.

The exposure and toxicity priority data needs in this notice were distilled from the data needs identified in ATSDR's toxicological profiles by the logical scientific approach described in a decision guide published in the Federal Register on September 11, 1989 (54 FR 37618). The priority data needs represent essential information to improve the database for conducting public health assessments. Research to address these priority data needs will help to determine the types or levels of exposure that may present significant risks of adverse health effects in people exposed to the hazardous substances.

The priority data needs identified in this notice reflect the opinion of ATSDR, in consultation with other federal programs, about the research needed pursuant to ATSDR's authority under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (Superfund), or CERCLA, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA) [42 U.S.C. 9604(i)]. The needs identified here do not represent the priority data needs for any other agency or program.

Consistent with Section 104(i)(12) of CERCLA as amended [42 U.S.C. 9604(i)(12)], nothing in this research program shall be construed to delay or otherwise affect or impair the President, the Administrator of ATSDR, or the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) from exercising any authority regarding any other provision of law, including the Toxic Substances Control Act of 1976 (TSCA) and the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act of 1972 (FIFRA), or the response and abatement authorities of CERCLA.

ATSDR worked with other federal programs to determine common substance-specific data needs and mechanisms to implement research that may include authorities under TSCA and FIFRA, private-sector voluntarism, or the direct use of CERCLA funds.

When deciding the type of research that should be done, ATSDR considers the recommendations of the Interagency Testing Committee (ITC) established under Section 4(e) of TSCA. Federally funded projects that collect information from 10 or more respondents and that are funded by cooperative agreements are subject to review by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) under the Paperwork Reduction Act. If the proposed project involves research on human subjects, the applicants must comply with Department of Health and Human Services regulations (45 CFR part 46) regarding the protection of human subjects. The applicants must assure that the project will be subject to initial and continuing review by the appropriate institutional review committees. Overall, by providing additional scientific information for the risk assessment process, data generated from this research will support other researchers who are conducting human health assessments involving these six substances.

Table 1 presents the priority data needs for six priority substances. The six substances are included in the ATSDR Priority List of Hazardous Substances (70 FR 72840, December 7, 2005). ATSDR invites comments from the public on the individual priority data needs and the priority data needs documents for these substances. After considering the comments, ATSDR will publish the final priority data needs for each substance. These priority data needs will be addressed by the mechanisms described in the “Implementation of Substance-Specific Applied Research Program” section of this Federal Register Notice.

 

Table of Contents Back to Top

Tables Back to Top

Table 1.—Substance-Specific Priority Data Needs for Six Priority Hazardous Substances Back to Top
Substance Priority data needs
(1)14 days or less.
Aluminum Exposure levels in humans living near hazardous waste sites.
Exposure levels in children.
Dose-response data for acute-duration(1)oral exposure.
Cresol Exposure levels in humans living near hazardous waste sites.
Exposure levels in children.
Dose-response data for acute-duration(1)oral exposure.
Diazinon Developmental toxicity data for oral exposure.
Dichloropropenes Dose-response data for acute-duration(1)inhalation exposure.
Immunotoxicity battery via inhalation exposure.
Guthion Studies of developmental toxicity via oral exposure with emphasis on neurodevelopmental toxicity.
Phenol Exposure levels in humans living near hazardous waste sites.
Exposure levels in children.
Two-year oral carcinogenicity bioassay.

Note:

Consult the priority data needs documents for details on how these priority data needs were determined.

Voluntary Research. This notice also serves as a continuous call for voluntary research proposals. Private-sector organizations may volunteer to conduct research to address specific priority data needs in this notice by submitting a letter of intent to ATSDR (see ADDRESSES section of this notice). A Tri-Agency Superfund Applied Research Committee (TASARC), comprised of scientists from ATSDR, the National Toxicology Program (NTP), and EPA, will review all proposals.

The substance-specific priority data needs were based on, and determined from, information in corresponding ATSDR toxicological profiles. Background technical information and justification for the priority data needs in this notice are in the priority data needs documents. These documents are available on ATSDR's Web site at http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/pdns/. Printed copies of these documents are also available for review by requesting them in writing from ATSDR (see ADDRESSES section of this notice).

DATES: Back to Top

Comments concerning the priority data needs for the six substances must be received by 90 days from the publication date. Regarding ATSDR's call for voluntary research proposals, the agency considers voluntary research crucial to the continuing development of SSARP and believes this effort should be an open and continuous one. Therefore, private-sector organizations are encouraged to volunteer to conduct research to address the identified priority data needs until ATSDR announces that other research has been initiated for a specific priority data need.

ADDRESSES: Back to Top

The priority data needs documents are available on ATSDR's Web site at http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/pdns/. Submit comments to Nickolette Roney, Applied Toxicology Branch, Division of Toxicology and Environmental Medicine, ATSDR, 1600 Clifton Road, NE., Mailstop F-32, Atlanta, Georgia 30333; e-mail: NRoney@cdc.gov. Information about pertinent ongoing or completed research that may fill priority data needs cited in this notice should be similarly addressed. Also, use the same address to request printed copies of the priority data needs documents and to submit proposals to conduct voluntary research.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Back to Top

Nickolette Roney, Applied Toxicology Branch, Division of Toxicology and Environmental Medicine, ATSDR, 1600 Clifton Road, NE., Mailstop F-32, Atlanta, Georgia 30333; e-mail: NRoney@cdc.gov; telephone: (770) 488-3332; fax: (770) 488-4178.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Back to Top

Background Back to Top

CERCLA, as amended by SARA [42 U.S.C. 9604(i)], requires that ATSDR (1) Develop jointly with EPA a list of hazardous substances found at National Priorities List (NPL) sites (in order of priority), (2) prepare toxicological profiles of these substances, and (3) ensure the initiation of a research program to address identified priority data needs associated with the substances.

SSARP was initiated in 1991. A list of priority data needs for 38 priority hazardous substances was announced in the Federal Register on October 17, 1991 (56 FR 52178). The list was subsequently revised, based on public comments, and was published in final form on November 16, 1992 (57 FR 54150). In 1997, after releasing for public comment, ATSDR finalized the priority data needs for a second list of 12 substances that priority data needs list was announced in the Federal Register on July 30, 1997 (62 FR 40820). ATSDR then identified priority data needs for a third list of 10 hazardous substances; this list was released as a draft for public comment and published in its final form on April 29, 2003 (68 FR 22704). On September 8, 2006, ATSDR released priority data needs for two hazardous substances as a draft for public comment (71 FR 53102).

This ATSDR SSARP supplies the necessary information to improve the database to conduct public health assessments. This link between research and public health assessments, and the process for distilling priority data needs for ranked hazardous substances from the data needs identified in associated ATSDR toxicological profiles, are described in the ATSDR “Decision Guide for Identifying Substance-Specific Data Needs Related to Toxicological Profiles” (54 FR 37618, September 11, 1989).

Implementation of Substance-Specific Applied Research Program Back to Top

In Section 104(i)(5)(D), CERCLA states that it is the sense of Congress that the costs for conducting this research program should be borne by the manufacturers and processors of the hazardous substances found under the Toxic Substances Control Act of 1976 (TSCA); by registrants under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act of 1972 (FIFRA); or by cost recovery from responsible parties under CERCLA. To execute this statutory intent, ATSDR developed a plan whereby parts of SSARP are being conducted through regulatory mechanisms (TSCA/FIFRA), private-sector voluntarism, and the direct use of CERCLA funds.

CERCLA also requires that ATSDR consider recommendations of the Interagency Testing Committee, established under Section 4(e) of TSCA, on the types of research to be done. ATSDR actively participates on this committee.

The mechanisms for implementing SSARP are discussed next. The status of SSARP in addressing priority data needs of the first 60 priority hazardous substances through these mechanisms was described in a Federal Register Notice on December 13, 2005 (70 FR 73749).

A. TSCA/FIFRA

In developing and implementing SSARP, ATSDR and EPA established procedures to identify those priority data needs of common interest to multiple Federal programs. Where practicable, these data needs will be addressed through a program of toxicologic testing under TSCA or FIFRA. This part of the research will be conducted according to established TSCA/FIFRA procedures and guidelines.

B. Private-Sector Voluntarism

As part of SSARP, on February 7, 1992, ATSDR announced a set of proposed procedures for conducting voluntary research (57 FR 4758). Revisions based on public comments were published on November 16, 1992 (57 FR 54160). ATSDR strongly encourages private-sector organizations to propose research to address priority data needs at any time until ATSDR announces that research has already been initiated for a specific priority data need. Private-sector organizations may volunteer to conduct research to address specific priority data needs identified in this notice by submitting a letter of intent.

The letter of intent should be a brief statement (1-2 pages) that identifies the priority data need(s) to be filled and the methods to be used. TASARC will review these proposals and recommend to ATSDR the voluntary research projects that should be pursued- and how they should be conducted-with the volunteer organizations. ATSDR will enter into only those voluntary research projects that lead to high-quality, peer-reviewed scientific work. Additional details regarding the process for voluntary research are in the Federal Register Notices cited in this section.

C. CERCLA

Those priority data needs that are not addressed by TSCA/FIFRA or initial voluntarism will be considered for funding by ATSDR through its CERCLA budget. Much of this research program is envisioned to be unique to CERCLA—for example, research on substances not regulated by other programs or research needs specific to public health assessments. A current example of the direct use of CERCLA funds is a cooperative agreement with the Minority Health Professions Foundation (MHPF) that supports the MHPF's Environmental Health, Health Services, and Toxicology Research Program.

Mechanisms to address these priority data needs may include a second call for voluntarism. Again, scientific peer review of study protocols and results would occur for all research conducted under this auspice.

Substance-Specific Priority Data Needs Back to Top

Table 1 identifies the priority data needs. ATSDR encourages private-sector organizations and other governmental programs to use ATSDR's priority data needs to plan their research activities.

Dated: December 19, 2007.

Ken Rose,

Director, Office of Policy, Planning and Evaluation, National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry.

[FR Doc. E7-25213 Filed 12-27-07; 8:45 am]

BILLING CODE 4163-70-P

Site Feedback