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Restrictions on Lobbying

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AGENCY:

Social Security Administration (SSA).

ACTION:

Final rules.

SUMMARY:

These final rules establish new regulations dealing with the restrictions on lobbying contained in the Common Rule, “New Restrictions on Lobbying,” commonly referred to as the Byrd Anti-Lobbying Amendment common rule. The Social Security Independence and Program Improvements Act of 1994 established SSA as an independent agency separate from the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), effective on March 31, 1995. To implement our own set of grants regulations, we have essentially codified the text of the Common Rule. These final rules, along with the final rules we are publishing elsewhere in today's Federal Register, establish SSA grants regulations, separate from those of HHS, effective upon publication.

EFFECTIVE DATE:

These final rules are effective May 27, 2003.

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FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:

Phyllis Y. Smith, Chief Grants Management Officer, Office of Operations Contracts and Grants, Office of Acquisition and Grants, SSA, 1710 Gwynn Oak Ave., Baltimore, MD 21207-5279; telephone (410) 965-9518; FAX (410) 966-9310.

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SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

I. Background

Section 319 of Pub. L. 101-121, enacted October 23, 1989, amended title 31, United States Code, by adding a new section 1352, entitled “Limitation on Use of Appropriated Funds to Influence Certain Federal Contracting and Financial Transactions,” commonly known as the Byrd Anti-Lobbying Amendment. This law prohibits the recipient of a Federal contract, grant, loan or cooperative agreement from using appropriated funds to pay any person to influence or attempt to influence an officer or employee of any agency, a Member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a Member of Congress in connection with any of the following covered Federal actions:

  • The awarding of any Federal contract,
  • The making of any Federal grant,
  • The making of any Federal loan,
  • The entering into of any cooperative agreement, and
  • The extension, continuation, renewal, amendment, or modification of any Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement.

The law also imposes requirements for disclosure and certification related to lobbying by recipients of any of the covered Federal actions. As called for by section 319 of Public Law 101-121, on December 18, 1989 (published December 20, 1989), the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued interim final guidance entitled “Governmentwide Guidance for New Restrictions on Lobbying,” which called for governmentwide implementation of, and compliance with, the requirements of section 1352.

HHS implements the provisions of the Byrd Anti-Lobbying Amendment common rule through its regulations at 45 CFR part 93. Prior to March 31, 1995, SSA was an operating component of HHS. As a result of Public Law 103-296, SSA became an independent agency on March 31, 1995. However, pursuant to section 106(b) of that law, the HHS regulations at 45 CFR part 93 have remained applicable to SSA. In order to implement our own set of grants regulations dealing with lobbying, we are essentially adopting the text of the anti-lobbying common rule at 20 CFR part 438. Part 438 is similar in all material respects to 45 CFR part 93 and to the governmentwide anti-lobbying common rule, which implements the requirements of section 319, Public Law 101-121 (31 U.S.C. 1352). HHS regulations at 45 CFR part 93 will cease to be applicable to SSA on the effective date of these regulations, in accordance with section 106(b) of Public Law 103-296.

II. Differences Between Part 438 and Common Rule/Part 93

A. In § 438.100(a), we have corrected the spelling of the word “agreement” where it is initially used in the term “cooperative agreement.”

B. In the second sentence of § 408.300(c), we have changed the word “or” to “of.” The sentence properly reads “For example, drafting of a legal document accompanying a bid * * *”.

C. Throughout new part 438, we have replaced, where appropriate, references to “awarding agency(ies)” with references to SSA. We have also made numerous nonsubstantive changes to make these rules easier for the public to read and understand.

Regulatory Procedures

Justification for Final Rule

Section 702(a)(5) of the Social Security Act (Act) makes the regulations we prescribe subject to the rulemaking procedures established under section 553 of the Administrative Procedure Act (APA), 5 U.S.C. 553. These procedures generally require publication of notice of the proposed rulemaking and the solicitation of comments from interested persons. However, the APA provides exceptions to notice and comment procedures when an agency finds that there is good cause for dispensing with such procedures on the basis that they are impracticable, unnecessary, or contrary to the public interest.

After due consideration, we have determined that under 5 U.S.C. 553(b)(B), good cause exists for waiver of notice of proposed rulemaking because such procedure would be unnecessary. These final regulations adopt as SSA regulations the provisions of the governmentwide anti-lobbying common rule without substantive change. Pursuant to section 106(b) of Public Law 103-296, the HHS regulations at 45 CFR part 93, which implement the provisions of the anti-lobbying common rule, remain applicable to SSA until such time as these regulations become effective. The differences in these regulations over those of the anti-lobbying common rule or those of 45 CFR part 93 are not substantive. Accordingly, promulgation of these regulations pursuant to notice and comment rulemaking is unnecessary and may be dispensed with pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 553(b)(B).

Waiver of 30-Day Delay in Effective Date

As indicated above, section 702(a)(5) of the Act makes the regulations we Start Printed Page 28745prescribe subject to the rulemaking procedures established under section 553 of the APA. Section 553(d) of the APA requires that the effective date of a substantive rule be no less than 30 days after its publication, except in cases of: Rules which grant or recognize an exemption or relieve a restriction; interpretative rules and statements of policy; or as otherwise provided by the agency for good cause found and published with the rule.

Under 5 U.S.C. 553(d)(3), good cause exists for dispensing with the minimum 30-day period between publication date and effective date. As indicated above, these regulations adopt without change the substantive provisions of the anti-lobbying common rule. A 30-day delay in the effective date of these regulations would serve no purpose since, during such delay, the identical provisions of Part 93, which implement the provisions of the anti-lobbying common rule, would remain applicable. Accordingly, these regulations are effective on publication.

Executive Order 12866

We have consulted with the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and have determined that these final rules do not meet the criteria for a significant regulatory action under Executive Order 12866, as amended by Executive Order 13258. Thus, they were not subject to OMB review. We have also determined that these rules meet the plain language requirement of Executive Order 12866, as amended by Executive Order 13258.

Regulatory Flexibility Act

We certify that these final rules will not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities because this rule merely reflects the adoption of existing grant policies and procedures by SSA and does not promulgate any new policies or procedures which would impact the public. Therefore, a regulatory flexibility analysis as provided in the Regulatory Flexibility Act, as amended, is not required.

Paperwork Reduction Act

The Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA) of 1995 says that no persons are required to respond to a collection of information unless it displays a valid OMB control number. In accordance with the PRA, SSA is providing notice that the Office of Management and Budget has approved the information collection requirements contained in § 438.110 of these final rules. The OMB Control Number for this collection is 0348-0046 (Standard Form—LLL (Disclosure Form to Report Lobbying)

(Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance: Program No. 96.007—Social Security—Research and Demonstration; and Program No. 96.008—Social Security Administration—Benefits Planning, Assistance, and Outreach Program)

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List of Subjects in 20 CFR Part 438

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Dated: April 25, 2003.

Jo Anne B. Barnhart,

Commissioner of Social Security.

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For the reasons set out in the preamble, we are adding a new part 438 to chapter III of title 20 of the Code of Federal Regulations to read as follows:

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1. Part 438 is added to read as follows:

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PART 438—RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING

Subpart A—General
438.100
Conditions on use of funds.
438.105
Definitions.
438.110
Certification and disclosure.
Subpart B—Activities by Own Employees
438.200
Agency and legislative liaison.
438.205
Professional and technical services.
438.210
Reporting.
Subpart C—Activities by Other than Own Employees
438.300
Professional and technical services.
Subpart D—Penalties and Enforcement
438.400
Penalties.
438.405
Penalty procedures.
438.410
Enforcement.
Subpart E—Exemptions
438.500
Secretary of Defense.
Subpart F—Agency Reports
438.600
Semi-annual compilation.
438.605
Inspector General report.

Appendix A to Part 438—Certification Regarding Lobbying

Appendix B to Part 438—Disclosure Form to Report Lobbying

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Authority: 5 U.S.C. 301.

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Subpart A—General

Conditions on use of funds.

(a) No appropriated funds may be expended by the recipient of a Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement to pay any person for influencing or attempting to influence an officer or employee of SSA, a Member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a Member of Congress in connection with any of the following covered Federal actions: the awarding of any Federal contract, the making of any Federal grant, the making of any Federal loan, the entering into of any cooperative agreement, and the extension, continuation, renewal, amendment, or modification of any Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement.

(b) Each person who requests or receives from SSA a Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement must file with SSA a certification, set forth in Appendix A to this part, that the person has not made, and will not make, any payment prohibited by paragraph (a) of this section.

(c) Each person who requests or receives from SSA a Federal contract, grant, loan, or a cooperative agreement must file with SSA a disclosure form, set forth in Appendix B to this part, if such person has made or has agreed to make any payment using non-appropriated funds (to include profits from any covered Federal action), which would be prohibited under paragraph (a) of this section if paid for with appropriated funds.

(d) Each person who requests or receives from SSA a commitment providing for the United States to insure or guarantee a loan must file with SSA a statement, set forth in Appendix A to this part, whether that person has made or has agreed to make any payment to influence or attempt to influence an officer or employee of SSA, a Member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a Member of Congress in connection with that loan insurance or guarantee.

(e) Each person who requests or receives from SSA a commitment providing for the United States to insure or guarantee a loan must file with SSA a disclosure form, set forth in Appendix B to this part, if that person has made or has agreed to make any payment to influence or attempt to influence an officer or employee of SSA, a Member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a Member of Congress in connection with that loan insurance or guarantee.

Definitions.

For purposes of this part:

Commissioner means the Commissioner of Social Security.

Covered Federal action means any of the following Federal actions:

(1) The awarding of any Federal contract;

(2) The making of any Federal grant;

(3) The making of any Federal loan;

(4) The entering into of any cooperative agreement; and,

(5) The extension, continuation, renewal, amendment, or modification of any Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement. Covered Federal action does not include receiving from Start Printed Page 28746an agency a commitment providing for the United States to insure or guarantee a loan. Loan guarantees and loan insurance are addressed independently within this part.

Federal contract means an acquisition contract awarded by the Social Security Administration, including those subject to the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) (48 CFR chapter 1), and any other acquisition contract for real or personal property or services not subject to the FAR.

Federal cooperative agreement means a cooperative agreement SSA enters into.

Federal grant means an award of financial assistance in the form of money, or property in lieu of money, by the Federal Government or a direct appropriation made by law to any person. The term does not include technical assistance which provides services instead of money, or other assistance in the form of revenue sharing, loans, loan guarantees, loan insurance, interest subsidies, insurance, or direct United States cash assistance to an individual.

Federal loan means a loan made by SSA. The term does not include loan guarantee or loan insurance.

Indian tribe and tribal organization have the meaning provided in section 4 of the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act (25 U.S.C. 450B). Alaskan Natives are included under the definitions of Indian tribes in that Act.

Influencing or attempting to influence means making, with the intent to influence, any communication to or appearance before an officer or employee of SSA, a Member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a Member of Congress in connection with any covered Federal action.

Loan guarantee and loan insurance means SSA's guarantee or insurance of a loan made by a person.

Local government means a unit of government in a State and, if chartered, established, or otherwise recognized by a State for the performance of a governmental duty, including a local public authority, a special district, an intrastate district, a council of governments, a sponsor group representative organization, and any other instrumentality of a local government.

Officer or employee of SSA includes the following individuals who are employed by an agency:

(1) An individual who is appointed to a position in the Government under title 5, U.S. Code, including a position under a temporary appointment;

(2) A member of the uniformed services as defined in section 101(3), title 37, U.S. Code;

(3) A special Government employee as defined in section 202, title 18, U.S. Code; and,

(4) An individual who is a member of a Federal advisory committee, as defined by the Federal Advisory Committee Act, title 5, U.S. Code appendix 2.

Person means an individual, corporation, company, association, authority, firm, partnership, society, State, and local government, regardless of whether such entity is operated for profit or not for profit. This term excludes an Indian tribe, tribal organization, or any other Indian organization with respect to expenditures specifically permitted by other Federal law.

Reasonable compensation means, with respect to a regularly employed officer or employee of any person, compensation that is consistent with the normal compensation for such officer or employee for work that is not furnished to, not funded by, or not furnished in cooperation with the Federal Government.

Reasonable payment means, with respect to professional and other technical services, a payment in an amount that is consistent with the amount normally paid for such services in the private sector.

Recipient includes all contractors, subcontractors at any tier, and subgrantees at any tier of the recipient of funds received in connection with a Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement. The term excludes an Indian tribe, tribal organization, or any other Indian organization with respect to expenditures specifically permitted by other Federal law.

Regularly employed means, with respect to an officer or employee of a person requesting or receiving a Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement or a commitment providing for the United States to insure or guarantee a loan, an officer or employee who is employed by such person for at least 130 working days within one year immediately preceding the date of the submission that initiates agency consideration of such person for receipt of such contract, grant, loan, cooperative agreement, loan insurance commitment, or loan guarantee commitment. An officer or employee who is employed by such person for less than 130 working days within one year immediately preceding the date of the submission that initiates agency consideration of such person shall be considered to be regularly employed as soon as he or she is employed by such person for 130 working days.

SSA means the Social Security Administration.

State means a State of the United States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, a territory or possession of the United States, an agency or instrumentality of a State, and a multi-State, regional, or interstate entity having governmental duties and powers.

Certification and disclosure.

(a) Each person must file a certification, and a disclosure form, if required, with each submission that initiates SSA consideration of that person for:

(1) Award of a Federal contract, grant, or cooperative agreement exceeding $100,000; or

(2) An award of a Federal loan or a commitment providing for the United States to insure or guarantee a loan exceeding $150,000.

(b) Each person must file a certification, and a disclosure form, if required, if he or she receives:

(1) A Federal contract, grant, or cooperative agreement exceeding $100,000; or

(2) A Federal loan or a commitment providing for the United States to insure or guarantee a loan exceeding $150,000, unless such person previously filed a certification, and a disclosure form, if required, under paragraph (a) of this section.

(c) Each person must file a disclosure form at the end of each calendar quarter in which there occurs any event that requires disclosure or that materially affects the accuracy of the information contained in any disclosure form previously filed by that person under paragraphs (a) or (b) of this section. An event that materially affects the accuracy of the information reported includes:

(1) A cumulative increase of $25,000 or more in the amount paid or expected to be paid for influencing or attempting to influence a covered Federal action; or

(2) A change in the person(s) or individual(s) influencing or attempting to influence a covered Federal action; or,

(3) A change in the officer(s), employee(s), or Member(s) contacted to influence or attempt to influence a covered Federal action.

(d) Any person who requests or receives from a person referred to in paragraphs (a) or (b) of this section:

(1) A subcontract exceeding $100,000 at any tier under a Federal contract;Start Printed Page 28747

(2) A subgrant, contract, or subcontract exceeding $100,000 at any tier under a Federal grant;

(3) A contract or subcontract exceeding $100,000 at any tier under a Federal loan exceeding $150,000; or,

(4) A contract or subcontract exceeding $100,000 at any tier under a Federal cooperative agreement, must file a certification, and a disclosure form, if required, to the next tier above.

(e) All disclosure forms, but not certifications, must be forwarded from tier to tier until received by the person referred to in paragraphs (a) or (b) of this section. That person must forward all disclosure forms to SSA.

(f) Any certification or disclosure form filed under paragraph (e) of this section will be treated as a material representation of fact upon which all receiving tiers must rely. All liability arising from an erroneous representation will be borne solely by the tier filing that representation and will not be shared by any tier to which the erroneous representation is forwarded. Submitting an erroneous certification or disclosure constitutes a failure to file the required certification or disclosure, respectively. If a person fails to file a required certification or disclosure, the United States may pursue all available remedies, including those authorized by section 1352, title 31, U.S. Code.

(g) No reporting is required for an activity paid for with appropriated funds if that activity is allowable under either subpart B or C of this part.

Subpart B—Activities by Own Employees

Agency and legislative liaison.

(a) The prohibition on the use of appropriated funds, in § 438.100(a), does not apply in the case of a payment of reasonable compensation made to an officer or employee of a person requesting or receiving a Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement if the payment is for agency and legislative liaison activities not directly related to a covered Federal action.

(b) For purposes of paragraph (a) of this section, providing any information specifically requested by SSA or Congress is allowable at any time.

(c) For purposes of paragraph (a) of this section, the following agency and legislative liaison activities are allowable at any time only where they are not related to a specific solicitation for any covered Federal action:

(1) Discussing with SSA (including individual demonstrations) the qualities and characteristics of the person's products or services, conditions or terms of sale, and service capabilities; and,

(2) Technical discussions and other activities regarding the application or adaptation of the person's products or services for SSA's use.

(d) For purposes of paragraph (a) of this section, the following agency and legislative liaison activities are allowable only where they are prior to formal solicitation of any covered Federal action:

(1) Providing any information not specifically requested but necessary for SSA to make an informed decision about initiation of a covered Federal action;

(2) Technical discussions regarding the preparation of an unsolicited proposal prior to its official submission; and,

(3) Capability presentations by persons seeking awards from SSA pursuant to the provisions of the Small Business Act, as amended by Public Law 95-507 and other subsequent amendments.

(e) Only those activities expressly authorized by this section are allowable under this section.

Professional and technical services.

(a) The prohibition on the use of appropriated funds, in § 438.100(a), does not apply in the case of a payment of reasonable compensation made to an officer or employee of a person requesting or receiving a Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement or an extension, continuation, renewal, amendment, or modification of a Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement if payment is for professional or technical services rendered directly in the preparation, submission, or negotiation of any bid, proposal, or application for that Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement or for meeting requirements imposed by or pursuant to law as a condition for receiving that Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement.

(b) For purposes of paragraph (a) of this section, professional and technical services are limited to advice and analysis directly applying any professional or technical discipline. For example, drafting of a legal document accompanying a bid or proposal by a lawyer is allowable. Similarly, technical advice provided by an engineer on the performance or operational capability of a piece of equipment rendered directly in the negotiation of a contract is allowable. However, communications with the intent to influence made by a professional (such as a licensed lawyer) or a technical person (such as a licensed accountant) are not allowable under this section unless they provide advice and analysis directly applying their professional or technical expertise and unless the advice or analysis is rendered directly and solely in the preparation, submission or negotiation of a covered Federal action. Thus, for example, communications with the intent to influence made by a lawyer that do not provide legal advice or analysis directly and solely related to the legal aspects of his or her client's proposal, but generally advocate one proposal over another are not allowable under this section because the lawyer is not providing professional legal services. Similarly, communications with the intent to influence made by an engineer providing an engineering analysis prior to the preparation or submission of a bid or proposal are not allowable under this section since the engineer is providing technical services but not directly in the preparation, submission or negotiation of a covered Federal action.

(c) Requirements imposed by or pursuant to law as a condition for receiving a covered Federal award include those required by law or regulation, or reasonably expected to be required by law or regulation, and any other requirements in the actual award documents.

(d) Only those services expressly authorized by this section are allowable under this section.

Reporting.

No reporting is required with respect to payments of reasonable compensation made to regularly employed officers or employees of a person.

Subpart C—Activities by Other Than Own Employees

Professional and technical services.

(a) The prohibition on the use of appropriated funds, in § 438.100(a), does not apply in the case of any reasonable payment to a person, other than an officer or employee of a person requesting or receiving a covered Federal action, if the payment is for professional or technical services rendered directly in the preparation, submission, or negotiation of any bid, proposal, or application for that Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement or for meeting requirements imposed by or pursuant to law as a condition for receiving that Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement.

(b) The reporting requirements in § 438.110 (a) and (b) regarding filing a Start Printed Page 28748disclosure form by each person, if required, do not apply with respect to professional or technical services rendered directly in the preparation, submission, or negotiation of any commitment providing for the United States to insure or guarantee a loan.

(c) For purposes of paragraph (a) of this section, professional and technical services are limited to advice and analysis directly applying any professional or technical discipline. For example, drafting of a legal document accompanying a bid or proposal by a lawyer is allowable. Similarly, technical advice provided by an engineer on the performance or operational capability of a piece of equipment rendered directly in the negotiation of a contract is allowable. However, communications with the intent to influence made by a professional (such as a licensed lawyer) or a technical person (such as a licensed accountant) are not allowable under this section unless they provide advice and analysis that directly apply to their professional or technical expertise and unless the advice or analysis is rendered directly and solely in the preparation, submission or negotiation of a covered Federal action. Thus, for example, communications with the intent to influence made by a lawyer that do not provide legal advice or analysis directly and solely related to the legal aspects of his or her client's proposal, but generally advocate one proposal over another are not allowable under this section because the lawyer is not providing professional legal services. Similarly, communications with the intent to influence made by an engineer providing an engineering analysis prior to the preparation or submission of a bid or proposal are not allowable under this section since the engineer is providing technical services but not directly in the preparation, submission or negotiation of a covered Federal action.

(d) Requirements imposed by or pursuant to law as a condition for receiving a covered Federal award include those required by law or regulation, or reasonably expected to be required by law or regulation, and any other requirements in the actual award documents.

(e) Persons other than officers or employees of a person requesting or receiving a covered Federal action include consultants and trade associations.

(f) Only those services expressly authorized by this section are allowable under this section.

Subpart D—Penalties and Enforcement

Penalties.

(a) Any person who makes an expenditure prohibited by this part is subject to a civil penalty of not less than $10,000 and not more than $100,000 for each prohibited expenditure.

(b) Any person who fails to file or amend the disclosure form (see Appendix B to this part) to be filed or amended if required by this part is subject to a civil penalty of not less than $10,000 and not more than $100,000 for each failure.

(c) A filing or amended filing on or after the date on which an administrative action for the imposition of a civil penalty is begun does not prevent the imposition of such civil penalty for a failure occurring before that date. An administrative action begins with respect to a failure when an investigating official determines in writing to begin an investigation of an allegation of such failure.

(d) In determining whether to impose a civil penalty, and the amount of any such penalty, by reason of a violation by any person, SSA will consider the nature, circumstances, extent, and gravity of the violation, the effect on the ability of the person to continue in business, any prior violations by the person, the degree of culpability of the person, the ability of the person to pay the penalty, and any other matters that may be appropriate.

(e) First offenders under paragraphs (a) or (b) of this section are subject to a civil penalty of $10,000, absent aggravating circumstances. Second and subsequent offenses by persons are subject to an appropriate civil penalty between $10,000 and $100,000, as determined by the Commissioner or his or her designee.

(f) Imposition of a civil penalty under this section does not prevent the United States from seeking any other remedy that may apply to the same conduct that is the basis for the imposition of the civil penalty.

Penalty procedures.

We will impose and collect civil penalties pursuant to the provisions of the Program Fraud and Civil Remedies Act, 31 U.S.C. sections 3803 (except subsection (c)), 3804, 3805, 3806, 3807, 3808, and 3812, to the extent these provisions are not inconsistent with the requirements in this part.

Enforcement.

The Commissioner of Social Security will take any actions necessary to ensure that the provisions in this part are vigorously implemented and enforced.

Subpart E—Exemptions

Secretary of Defense.

(a) The Secretary of Defense may exempt, on a case-by-case basis, a covered Federal action from the prohibition whenever the Secretary determines, in writing, that such an exemption is in the national interest. The Secretary shall transmit a copy of each such written exemption to Congress immediately after making such a determination.

(b) The Department of Defense may issue supplemental regulations to implement paragraph (a) of this section.

Subpart F—Agency Reports

Semi-annual compilation.

(a) The Commissioner of Social Security will collect and compile the disclosure reports (see Appendix B to this part) and, on May 31 and November 30 of each year, submit to the Secretary of the Senate and the Clerk of the House of Representatives a report containing a compilation of the information contained in the disclosure reports received during the 6-month period ending on March 31 or September 30, respectively, of that year.

(b) The report, including the compilation, will be available for public inspection 30 days after receipt of the report by the Secretary and the Clerk.

(c) Information that involves intelligence matters will be reported only to the Select Committee on Intelligence of the Senate, the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate and the House of Representatives in accordance with procedures agreed to by such committees. Such information will not be available for public inspection.

(d) Information that is classified under Executive Order 12356 or any successor order will be reported only to the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives (whichever such committees have jurisdiction of matters involving such information) and to the Committees on Appropriations of the Senate and the House of Representatives in accordance with procedures agreed to by such committees. Such information will not be available for public inspection.

(e) The first semi-annual compilation was submitted on May 31, 1990, and contains a compilation of the disclosure Start Printed Page 28749reports received from December 23, 1989 to March 31, 1990.

(f) Major agencies designated by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) were required to provide machine-readable compilations to the Secretary of the Senate and the Clerk of the House of Representatives by May 31, 1991. OMB provided detailed specifications in a memorandum to these agencies.

(g) SSA will keep the originals of all disclosure reports in our official files.

Inspector General report.

(a) The Inspector General of Social Security, or other official as specified in paragraph (b) of this section, will prepare and submit to Congress each year an evaluation of SSA compliance with, and the effectiveness of, the requirements in this part. The evaluation may include any recommended changes that may be necessary to strengthen or improve the requirements.

(b) The annual report will be submitted at the same time we submit our annual budget justification to Congress.

(c) The annual report will include the following: All alleged violations covered by the report, the actions taken by the Commissioner in the year covered by the report with respect to those alleged violations and alleged violations in previous years, and the amounts of civil penalties imposed by SSA in the year covered by the report.

Appendix A to Part 438—Certification Regarding Lobbying

Certification for Contracts, Grants, Loans, and Cooperative Agreements

The undersigned certifies, to the best of his or her knowledge and belief, that:

(1) No Federal appropriated funds have been paid or will be paid, by or on behalf of the undersigned, to any person for influencing or attempting to influence an officer or employee of an agency, a Member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a Member of Congress in connection with the awarding of any Federal contract, the making of any Federal grant, the making of any Federal loan, the entering into of any cooperative agreement, and the extension, continuation, renewal, amendment, or modification of any Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement.

(2) If any funds other than Federal appropriated funds have been paid or will be paid to any person for influencing or attempting to influence an officer or employee of any agency, a Member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a Member of Congress in connection with this Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement, the undersigned shall complete and submit Standard Form—LLL, “Disclosure Form to Report Lobbying,” in accordance with its instructions.

(3) The undersigned shall require that the language of this certification be included in the award documents for all subawards at all tiers (including subcontracts, subgrants, and contracts under grants, loans, and cooperative agreements) and that all subrecipients shall certify and disclose accordingly.

This certification is a material representation of fact upon which reliance was placed when this transaction was made or entered into. Submission of this certification is a prerequisite for making or entering into this transaction imposed by section 1352, title 31, U.S. Code. Any person who fails to file the required certification shall be subject to a civil penalty of not less than $10,000 and not more than $100,000 for each such failure.

Statement for Loan Guarantees and Loan Insurance

The undersigned states, to the best of his or her knowledge and belief, that:

If any funds have been paid or will be paid to any person for influencing or attempting to influence an officer or employee of any agency, a Member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a Member of Congress in connection with this commitment providing for the United States to insure or guarantee a loan, the undersigned shall complete and submit Standard Form—LLL, “Disclosure Form to Report Lobbying,” in accordance with its instructions.

Submission of this statement is a prerequisite for making or entering into this transaction imposed by section 1352, title 31, U.S. Code. Any person who fails to file the required statement shall be subject to a civil penalty of not less than $10,000 and not more than $100,000 for each such failure.

Appendix B to Part 438—Disclosure Form to Report Lobbying

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BILLING CODE 4191-02-P

[FR Doc. 03-11853 Filed 5-23-03; 8:45 am]

BILLING CODE 4191-02-C