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Phytosanitary Treatments; Location of Treatment Schedules and Other Requirements

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AGENCY:

Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA.

ACTION:

Final rule.

SUMMARY:

This final rule amends the plant health regulations by adding to 7 CFR part 305 treatment schedules and related requirements that now appear in the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual and by removing the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual from the list of material that is incorporated by reference into the regulations. We are taking this action to simplify the process for amending treatment schedules and related requirements and to more clearly distinguish between treatment-related requirements and nonbinding administrative information, which the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual also contains.

EFFECTIVE DATE:

June 7, 2005.

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FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:

Ms. Meredith C. Jones, Regulatory Coordination Specialist, PPQ, APHIS, 4700 River Road Unit 141, Riverdale, MD 20737-1236; (301) 734-7467.

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SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Background

The regulations in 7 CFR parts 300 to 399 (referred to below as the regulations) are intended, among other things, to prevent the introduction or spread of plant pests and noxious weeds into or within the United States. Under the regulations, certain plants, fruits, vegetables, and other articles must be treated before they may be moved into the United States or interstate. Most of the phytosanitary treatments authorized by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) are contained in the Plant Protection and Quarantine (PPQ) Treatment Manual. Among other things, the PPQ Treatment Manual contains approximately 400 treatment schedules, detailed instructions for administering the treatments, and requirements for certification of facilities that administer the treatments.

Prior to this rule, the PPQ Treatment Manual was incorporated by reference into the regulations at 7 CFR 300.1. In this document, we are amending 7 CFR part 300, “Incorporation by Reference,” to remove the PPQ Treatment Manual from the list of materials incorporated.

We are adding the portions of the PPQ Treatment Manual that prescribe the treatment schedules, instructions for administering the treatments, and requirements for certification of facilities that administer the treatments to 7 CFR part 305, “Phytosanitary Treatments.” The purpose of part 305 is to provide treatment schedules and other requirements related to approved treatments; it does not indicate whether treatment is required for a particular article to be imported or moved interstate. Whether treatment is required for a commodity will continue to be indicated in the regulations in 7 CFR part 301, the domestic quarantine notices; part 318, the Hawaiian and territorial quarantine notices; part 319, the foreign quarantine notices; on a permit; or by an inspector.

One of the reasons that we are adding the treatment schedules and other requirements to part 305 is to distinguish the treatment schedules and other treatment-related requirements from administrative information in the PPQ Treatment Manual that has no regulatory purpose. In addition to the treatment provisions, the PPQ Treatment Manual contains useful information such as operational procedures for port inspectors, conversion tables, instructions for using treatment and safety equipment, and a reference guide to commercial suppliers of treatment and safety equipment. It also contains copies of U.S. Coast Guard regulations related to shipboard fumigation, as well as other technical information. We believe that placing the treatment schedules and other requirements related to treatments in part 305 will clearly distinguish those requirements that APHIS intends to enforce from other, nonbinding information.

Another reason for placing the treatment schedules and other requirements in part 305 is to simplify and improve the efficiency of our rulemaking process for rules involving phytosanitary treatments. Materials that have been incorporated by reference into the CFR have the same force and effect as the regulations themselves, without taking up what may be a large number of pages in the CFR. The Office of the Federal Register must approve the incorporation by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. If that material is later revised, and the agency wishes to have the revision incorporated by reference, the revision must also be approved by the Office of the Federal Register for incorporation by reference. While incorporation by reference can save time and space in the CFR by allowing an agency to refer to an already published document rather than duplicating that material in the CFR, the process is inefficient when the document that is incorporated by reference is frequently updated, as occurs with the PPQ Treatment Manual.

For example, on October 1, 2002, we published a proposed rule in the Federal Register to amend 7 CFR part 319 allow the importation of various fruits and vegetables into the United States under specified conditions (Docket No. 02-026-1, 67 FR 61547-61564). In some cases, the specified conditions included treatments, which needed to be added to the PPQ Treatment Manual. Therefore, before the final rule could be published, the changes to the PPQ Treatment Manual had to be reviewed and approved by the Office of the Federal Register, and the final rule, in addition to amending part 319, also amended part 300 to show that revisions to the PPQ Treatment Manual had been approved for incorporation by reference (Docket No. 02-026-4, 68 FR 37904-37923, published and effective on June 25, 2003). Including the treatment provisions directly in the regulations rather than incorporating them by reference will eliminate the separate approval process required for material incorporated by reference and could make new and amended treatment provisions available to the public sooner.

In conjunction with adding treatment schedules and other requirements to part 305, we are amending the regulations in parts 301, 318, and 319 by removing references to the PPQ Treatment Manual and adding references to part 305. Except as discussed below, we have not moved treatment schedules that are already in the CFR in parts 301, 318, and 319 to part 305. We intend to move those treatment schedules to part 305 in future rulemakings.

Treatment Schedules Moved to Part 305 From Other Parts

Sections 318.13-4a and 318.58-4a of part 318 and § 319.56-2c of part 319 authorize the use of quick freeze treatment for certain fruits and vegetables. We have moved the provisions of these sections that pertain directly to treatment to part 305. Specifically, we have included in § 305.1 a definition of the term quick freeze that is derived from paragraph (a) of those sections. This definition reads: “A commercially acceptable method of Start Printed Page 33265quick freezing at subzero temperatures with subsequent storage and transportation at not higher than 20 °F. Methods that accomplish this are known as quick freezing, sharp freezing, cold pack, or frozen pack, but may be any equivalent commercially acceptable freezing method.” We have also moved to part 305 provisions from those sections regarding inspection of the fruits and vegetables upon arrival. These provisions state that the fruits or vegetables may not be removed from the vessel or vehicle transporting them until an inspector has determined that they are in a satisfactory frozen state upon arrival (i.e., at 20 °F or below). They further state that if the temperature of the fruits or vegetables in any part of a shipment is found to be above 20 °F at the time of inspection upon arrival, the entire shipment must remain on board the vessel or vehicle under such safeguards as may be prescribed by the inspector until the temperature of the shipment is below 20 °F, or the shipment is transported outside the United States or its territorial waters, or is otherwise disposed of to the satisfaction of the inspector.

Since the definition of quick freeze and the requirements for maintaining this frozen state have been moved from §§ 318.13-4a, 318.58-4a, and 319.56-2c to part 305, we have amended all three sections to state that quick freezing is authorized in accordance with part 305. Because the Agency's liability for treatment is discussed in § 305.2, we have removed the paragraphs from each section that pertain to treatment liability. In addition, we have made minor, nonsubstantive changes to those sections, such as changing “Deputy Administrator” to “Administrator” and redesignating paragraphs, and replacing a reference to the Caroline Islands with references to Palau and the Federated States of Micronesia.

Section 319.75-4 of part 319 contained treatment schedules for khapra beetle. These schedules had typographical errors and inconsistencies with the treatment schedules for khapra beetle in the PPQ Treatment Manual. For example, a treatment schedule at § 319.74(a)(3)(iii) indicated that methyl bromide could be applied at temperatures below 40 °F—a temperature range that is not authorized by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and that would not effectively neutralize the pest. The correct schedules from the PPQ Treatment Manual are now included in part 305, and we have removed the treatment schedules from § 319.75-4 and added a reference to part 305. This eliminates duplication of the treatment schedules and the errors contained in § 319.75-4.

Duplication of Some Treatment Schedules

In a few cases, we are adding treatment schedules now located in parts 301 and 318 to part 305, without, at this time, removing the treatment schedules from parts 301 and 318. In these cases, the fruits and vegetables may be moved interstate from areas within the United States that are under Federal quarantine if they are treated either according to treatment schedules found in the PPQ Treatment Manual or according to different treatment schedules found in parts 301 and 318. To ensure that persons referring to part 305 find all approved treatments for these fruits and vegetables will be able to find all applicable treatment schedules in one place in the CFR, we have duplicated in part 305 the treatment schedules for these fruits and vegetables that had only been found in parts 301 and 318. We are leaving the treatment schedules in parts 301 and 318 temporarily to ensure that readers know they are still valid. The format of these treatment schedules in part 305 has, in some cases, been altered to be consistent with the other schedules we are adding to part 305.

We are not duplicating in part 305 any of the treatment schedules found in part 319. We intend to move all the treatment schedules in part 319 to part 305 in a separate rulemaking.

Removal of Some Treatment Schedules From the CFR

In § 319.40-7 of part 319, paragraph (f) set out requirements for fumigation with methyl bromide of logs, lumber, and other unmanufactured wood products. Paragraph (f) referred to specific treatment schedules in the PPQ Treatment Manual and set out other schedules that could be used in lieu of the PPQ Treatment Manual schedules. In lieu of treatment schedule T-404 in the PPQ Treatment Manual, paragraphs (f)(1)(ii), (f)(2), and (f)(3)(ii) provided for fumigation to be conducted with an initial methyl bromide concentration of at least 120 grams per cubic meter with exposure and concentration levels adequate to provide a concentration-time product of at least 1920 gram-hours calculated on the initial methyl bromide concentration. However, this standard is impossible to achieve given normal decreases in fumigant concentration and is therefore never used. We have, therefore, removed this alternative schedule from § 319.40-7(f)(1)(ii), (f)(2), and (f)(3)(ii). The alternative treatment schedules in § 319.40-7(f)(1)(i) and (f)(3)(i) remain. We have replaced references to the PPQ Treatment Manual with references to part 305.

Correction of Some Treatment Schedules

We have also corrected errors contained in treatment schedules in the PPQ Treatment Manual. Specifically, in a treatment for corn seed (treatment schedule T510-2), the temperature for steam is shown as 40 °F in the PPQ Treatment Manual. The correct temperature of at least 240 °F is now given in part 305. A methyl bromide treatment schedule for khapra beetle (T301-b-1-2) incorrectly stated that the treatment is to be conducted at normal atmospheric pressure. We have corrected that treatment schedule in part 305 to specify that the treatment is to be conducted in vacuum fumigation chambers. A treatment for citrus seeds from countries where citrus canker exists (T511-1) specified a 0.525 percent concentration of sodium hypochlorite for a chemical dip treatment, while the regulations at § 319.37-6(e) specified a concentration of 200 parts per million. The regulations are correct, and part 305 contains the corrected treatment schedule. Both the regulations at § 319.56-2ii(b) and the PPQ Treatment Manual stated that a vapor heat treatment for mangoes from the Philippines (T106-d- 1) was approved for all Bactrocera spp. fruit flies; in fact, it is only approved for Bactrocera occipitalis and B. philippinensis. Part 305 contains the corrected treatment schedule. Finally, in a cold treatment schedule for pecans and hickory nuts (T107-g), the PPQ Treatment Manual lists the temperature range within which the treatment is to be conducted as 32 °F or below; the correct temperature range is 0 °F or below, and part 305 contains the corrected treatment schedule.

Except to correct the errors just discussed, part 305 retains the descriptions of treated articles, treatment schedules, and instructions for administering treatments that had been contained in the PPQ Treatment Manual. In some cases, this has meant retaining schedules and administration instructions that appear to be substantively identical; the three hot water immersion treatment schedules in § 305.22, for example, differ only in wording. In other cases, we have retained language that may be ambiguous; in vapor heat treatment schedule T106-e, the treatment instructions state that fruit must be held at 114.8 °F or above for 20 minutes, without stating whether 20 minutes is a minimum time or the exact time for Start Printed Page 33266which that temperature must be held. We are currently reviewing the provisions of the PPQ Treatment Manual that we have moved into part 305 in this final rule, and we may amend part 305 in the future to address issues such as those described above. If we undertake such amendments, we will do so through notice-and-comment rulemaking.

In the course of transferring the requirements for treatment facilities to part 305 from the Treatment Manual, we edited the requirements to make them more performance based, clear, and concise, and to eliminate redundancy. However, these requirements were not changed in any substantive way.

The amended content of part 305 is discussed below in general terms; specific requirements for phytosanitary treatments are contained in the rule portion of this document.

Amended Part 305

Definitions

We are amending § 305.1 by adding several definitions for types of treatments and terms related to administering treatments. Specifically, we are adding definitions for the following terms: Autoclaving, cold treatment, forced hot air, fumigant, fumigation, hitchhiker pest, hot water immersion dip, irradiation, methyl bromide, phosphine, quick freeze, Section 18 of Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), sulfuryl fluoride, steam heat, vacuum fumigation, and vapor heat. The definitions for each of these terms are located below in the rule portion of the document, along with the terms and definitions that were already included in part 305, prior to this rule.

We are also amending the definition of inspector, which had previously been defined as “Any employee of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service or other person authorized by the Administrator to inspect and certify the plant health status of plants and products under this part,” to reflect the fact that some inspection responsibilities have been transferred to the Department of Homeland Security's Bureau of Customs and Border Protection.

Approved Treatments

Prior to this rule, § 305.2 contained provisions for the irradiation treatment of imported fruits and vegetables for certain fruit flies and a mango seed weevil. Since irradiation treatment of imported fruits and vegetables will now be one of a number of treatments located in part 305, we are reorganizing the part, and we have redesignated the section concerning irradiation of imported fruits and vegetables as § 305.31. Section 305.2 now lists the commodities for which approved treatments are available.

The listed commodities are alpha grass and handicrafts; bags, bagging materials, and covers; broomcorn and broomcorn articles; cotton and cotton products; cut flowers and greenery; equipment; fruits and vegetables; garbage; hay, baled; materials or products that could be infested by khapra beetle; miscellaneous nonfood, nonfeed commodities; plants, bulbs, corms, tubers, rhizomes, and roots; railroad cars (empty); rice straw and hulls; seeds; ships, containers, and surrounding area; skins (goatskins, lambskins, and sheepskins); soil; sugarcane; and wood products. The commodities, except for fruits and vegetables, are primarily arranged alphabetically by the type of commodity, followed by pests of concern and approved treatment schedules.

The list of fruits and vegetables is arranged first by the area of origin of the fruit or vegetable, including specific foreign countries and quarantined areas in the United States. Currently, treatment is authorized for fruits and vegetables from specific regions in 7 CFR parts 301, 318, and 319 or in departmental permits issued in accordance with 7 CFR part 319. Although the origin of fruits and vegetables is seldom identified in the PPQ Treatment Manual, we have included this information in the list of approved treatments for fruits and vegetables, when possible, to assist importers, individuals who administer the treatments, and others in determining whether a treatment is available for admissible fruits or vegetables from a specific country or quarantined area within the United States. In cases where a treatment is approved for a commodity but not associated with a specific country or other area of origin, the commodity is listed under “All.” Beside each area of origin, we list specific fruits and vegetables from those areas for which a treatment is authorized. Alongside the specific commodity for which treatment is authorized, the list shows the pest of concern followed by the treatment schedule that may be used to treat the commodity for that pest.

Some treatment schedules are set out in § 305.2, but in most cases, the treatment schedules identified are located in a subsequent subpart according to the type of treatment—chemical, cold, quick freeze, heat, irradiation, various treatments for garbage, and miscellaneous. Most listed treatments are identified by a combination of capital letters and a “T” (treatment) number (e.g., MB T104-a-1). The capital letters indicate the type of treatment (e.g., MB refers to methyl bromide fumigation), and the “T” number (e.g., T104-a-1) refers to a specific treatment schedule. Listed treatments that duplicate schedules in part 301 have acronymic identifiers; for example, a treatment schedule to neutralize Oriental fruit fly in fruits and vegetables using fumigation with methyl bromide is identified as MBOFF. (It was not necessary to introduce acronymic identifiers for listed treatments that duplicate schedules in part 318; irradiation is the only treatment for which a schedule was duplicated from part 318, and it is identified by the generic abbreviation IR.)

Chemical Treatments

The first section (§ 305.5) within the subpart for chemical treatments contains requirements for facility certification, treatment monitoring, and treatment procedures. One of the requirements is that all chemical applications must be administered in accordance with an EPA-approved pesticide label and the APHIS-approved treatment schedule. It is possible that EPA may cancel the approval for use of a pesticide on a commodity before APHIS has had the opportunity to remove the associated treatment schedule for that commodity. If EPA cancels the approval for use of a pesticide on a commodity, the schedule is no longer authorized. If the commodity is not listed on the label or does not have a section 18 exemption under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), then no chemical treatment is available.

The next five sections provide the treatment schedules for administering methyl bromide (§ 305.6); phosphine (§ 305.7); sulfuryl fluoride (§ 305.8); aerosol spray for aircraft (§ 305.9); combination treatments (§ 305.10), which combine chemical treatments with nonchemical treatments, such as fumigation with methyl bromide and cold treatment; and miscellaneous chemical treatments (§ 305.11). The treatment schedules set out requirements that are within the limits authorized by EPA. However, to ensure that an actionable pest is neutralized with minimal effect on the quality of the commodity, the schedules may be more specific than what is stated on the pesticide label. Start Printed Page 33267

Nonchemical Treatments

Nonchemical treatments are organized into six subparts: Cold treatment, quick freeze, heat treatment, irradiation, various treatment for garbage, and miscellaneous treatments.

The subpart for cold treatment contains treatment requirements (§ 305.15) and treatment schedules (§ 305.16). The treatment requirements in § 305.15 cover facility and carrier approval, treatment enclosures, treatment monitoring, compliance agreements for cold treatment facilities located in the United States, work plans for cold treatment facilities located outside the United States, and treatment procedures.

The subpart for quick freeze treatment lists commodities for which quick freeze is authorized and prohibited in § 305.17 and sets out treatment schedule T110 in § 305.18.

The subpart for heat treatments includes treatment requirements (§ 305.20) and treatment schedules for hot water dip (§ 305.21), hot water immersion (§ 305.22), steam sterilization (§ 305.23), vapor heat (§ 305.24), dry heat (§ 305.25), heat treatment for materials or products that could be infested by khapra beetle (§ 305.26), forced hot air (§ 305.27), and kiln sterilization (§ 305.28). The treatment requirements in § 305.20 cover facility certification, treatment monitoring, compliance agreements for heat treatment facilities located in the United States, work plans for facilities located outside the United States, and treatment procedures.

(Note: APHIS certification of facilities that administer approved phytosanitary treatments always involves the preparation of a compliance agreement for facilities within the United States, or the preparation of a work plan for facilities outside the United States. The compliance agreement or work plan sets out the procedures the facilities will follow and is signed by officials from APHIS and the facility (in the case of a compliance agreement) or by officials from APHIS, the facility, and the national plant protection organization of the country of export (in the case of a work plan). The PPQ Treatment Manual specifically mentions the need for a work plan in sections pertaining to certification of facilities for some types of heat treatment, but not all, and does not mention compliance agreements. For clarity and transparency, we are referencing both types of documents in part 305 under each type of heat treatment.)

The subpart for irradiation includes four sections authorizing irradiation treatment for commodities from different areas and for different pests. Irradiation treatment for imported fruits and vegetables, which was the only treatment provided for in part 305 prior to this final rule, has been moved to § 305.31. This new section includes all the provisions previously in § 305.2, plus two requirements from the PPQ Treatment Manual: (1) All containers or vans that will transport treated commodities must be free of pests prior to loading the treated commodities and (2) each shipment of fruits and vegetables treated outside the United States must be accompanied into the United States by a phytosanitary certificate. All of these requirements are now in § 305.31. The subpart for irradiation also includes three sections, §§ 305.32 through 305.34, that duplicate the irradiation treatments in § 301.64-10(g), for regulated articles moved interstate from areas under Federal quarantine for Mexican fruit fly; in § 301.78-10(c), for regulated articles moved interstate from areas under Federal quarantine for Mediterranean fruit fly; and in § 318.13-4f, for certain commodities moved interstate from Hawaii.

The subpart for garbage treatments contains treatment schedules and requirements for caterers conducting the treatments under compliance agreements (§ 305.40). The subpart lists three treatment schedules for neutralizing insect pests and pathogens: Incineration, dry heat, and grinding and discharge into a sewer system.

The miscellaneous treatments subpart contains treatment schedules for soapy water and wax for certain fruits; warm soapy water and brushing for durian and other large fruits, such as breadfruit; and alternative treatments for plant material not tolerant to fumigation (§ 305.42).

Miscellaneous

We have made minor, nonsubstantive changes to parts 301, 318, and 319. In § 319.56-2k, we have replaced a reference to the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics with a reference to Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Estonia, Georgia, Latvia, Lithuania, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Republic of Moldova, Russian Federation, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan. In parts 301, 318, and 319, we have changed references to “he” or “him” to terms that are more inclusive (e.g., “he or she” or “the inspector”). Because the Oxford Plant Protection Center has moved to the Center for Plant Health Science and Technology, we have amended the address in the regulations. We have also corrected typographical errors in the regulations.

Internal Agency Management

This rule relates to internal agency management. Therefore, this rule is exempt from the provisions of Executive Orders 12866 and 12988. Moreover, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 553, notice of proposed rulemaking and opportunity for comment are not required for this rule, and it may be made effective less than 30 days after publication in the Federal Register. In addition, under 5 U.S.C. 804, this rule is not subject to congressional review under the Congressional Review Act of 1996, Pub. L. 104-121. Finally, this action is not a rule as defined by 5 U.S.C. 601 et seq., the Regulatory Flexibility Act, and thus is exempt from the provisions of that Act.

Paperwork Reduction Act

This rule contains no information collection or recordkeeping requirements under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.). [Must be confirmed.]

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List of Subjects

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Accordingly, we are amending 7 CFR chapter III as follows:

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PART 300—INCORPORATION BY REFERENCE

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1. The authority citation for part 300 continues to read as follows:

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Authority: 7 U.S.C. 7701-7772; 7 CFR 2.22, 2.80, and 371.3.

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[Removed and reserved]
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2. Section 300.1 is removed and reserved.

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PART 301—DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

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3. The authority citation for part 301 continues to read as follows:

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Authority: 7 U.S.C. 7701-7772; 7 CFR 2.22, 2.80, and 371.3.

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Section 301.75-15 also issued under Sec. 204, Title II, Pub. L. 106-113, 113 Stat. 1501A-293; sections 301.75-15 and 301.75-16 also issued under Sec. 203, Title II, Pub. L. 106-224, 114 Stat. 400 (7 U.S.C. 1421 note).

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4. In § 301.45-1, the definition of

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5. Section 301.45-4 is amended by redesignating footnote 4 as footnote 3.

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6. In § 301.45-5, paragraph (a)(3) is amended by adding the words “and part 305 of this chapter” immediately after the words “treatment manual”.

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7. In § 301.45-6, paragraph (a) is amended by adding the words “and part 305 of this chapter” immediately after the words “treatment manual”.

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8. Section 301.48-1 is amended by removing the definition of

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9. In § 301.48-4, paragraph (d)(4) is amended by removing the words “with the Treatment Manual” and adding the words “with part 305 of this chapter” in their place; and by removing the words “the Treatment Manual” and adding the words “part 305 of this chapter” in their place.

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10. Section 301.52-1 is amended by removing the definition of

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11. Section 301.52-3 is amended by redesignating footnote 3 as footnote 2.

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12. Section 301.52-4 is amended as follows:

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a. In paragraph (a)(3), by removing the words “the treatment manual” and adding the words “part 305 of this chapter” in their place.

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b. In paragraph (b), by removing the words “the treatment manual” and adding the words “part 305 of this chapter” in their place; and by removing the word “he” and adding the words “the inspector” in its place.

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c. In paragraph (f), by removing the word “he” and adding the words “the inspector” in its place.

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13. In § 301.52-5, paragraph (b) is amended by removing the word “he” and adding the words “the inspector” in its place.

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14. Section 301.64-10 is amended as follows:

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a. In paragraph (a), by removing the words “the PPQ Treatment Manual, which is incorporated by reference at § 300.1” and adding the words “part 305” in their place; and by removing the second sentence.

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b. In paragraphs (d) and (e), by removing the words “the PPQ Treatment Manual” and adding the words “part 305 of this chapter” in their place.

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c. By revising paragraph (f) to read as set forth below.

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d. In footnote 10 and in paragraph (g)(7), by removing the address “Oxford Plant Protection Center, 901 Hillsboro St., Oxford, NC 27565” and adding the address “Center for Plant Health Science and Technology, 1017 Main Campus Drive, suite 2500, Raleigh, NC 27606” in its place.

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Treatments.
* * * * *

(f) Citrons, litchis, longans, persimmons, and white sapotes. Cold treatment in accordance with the following schedule, which is also found in part 305 of this chapter:

Treatment (°F)Exposure period (days)
33 or below18
34 or below20
35 or below22
* * * * *
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15. In § 301.75-4, paragraph (d)(2) is amended by removing the word “guarantined” and adding the word “quarantined” in its place, both times it occurs.

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16. Section 301.78-10 is amended as follows:

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a. In the introductory text, by removing the words “the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual” and adding the words “part 305 of this chapter” in their place; and by removing the second sentence.

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b. In footnote 10 and in paragraph (c)(7), by removing the address “Oxford Plant Protection Center, 901 Hillsboro St., Oxford, NC 27565” and adding the address “Center for Plant Health Science and Technology, 1017 Main Campus Drive, suite 2500, Raleigh, NC 27606” in its place.

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17. In § 301.81-4, paragraph (b) is amended by removing the words “the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual, which is incorporated by reference at § 300.1” and adding the words “part 305” in their place.

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18. Section 301.85-1 is amended by removing the definition of

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19. Section 301.85-2, paragraph (d) is amended by adding the words “or she” immediately after the word “he”, both times it occurs.

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20. Section 301.85-4 is amended as follows:

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a. In paragraph (a), by removing the word “he” and adding the words “the inspector” in its place.

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b. In paragraphs (a)(2), (b), and (e), second sentence, by removing the words “the treatment manual” and adding the words “part 305 of this chapter” in their place.

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c. In paragraph (f), by adding the words “or she” after the word “he” and by adding the words “or her” after the word “his”.

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21. In § 301.85-5, paragraph (c), first sentence, is amended by removing the word “he” and adding the words “the inspector” in its place.

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22. The introductory text of §§ 301.93-10, 301.97-10, is amended by removing the words “the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual” and adding the words “part 305 of this chapter” in their place; and by removing the second sentence.

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23. Section 301.98-10 is amended as follows:

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a. In the introductory text, by removing the words “the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual” and adding the words “part 305 of this chapter” in their place; and by removing the second sentence.

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b. In paragraph (b), by removing the words “the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual” and adding the words “part 305 of this chapter” in their place.

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24. Section 301.99-10 is amended as follows:

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a. In the introductory text, by removing the words “the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual” and adding the words “part 305 of this chapter” in their place; and by removing the second and third sentences.

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b. In paragraph (b), first sentence, by removing the words “as an alternative to treating the fruits as provided in the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual”.

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c. In paragraph (c), first sentence, by removing the words “the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual” and adding the words “part 305 of this chapter” in their place.

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25. Part 305 is revised to read as follows:

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PART 305—PHYTOSANITARY TREATMENTS

305.1
Definitions.
305.2
Approved treatments.
305.3-305-4
[Reserved]
Subpart—Chemical Treatments
305.5
Treatment requirements.
305.6
Methyl bromide fumigation treatment schedules.
305.7
Phosphine treatment schedules.
305.8
Sulfuryl fluoride treatment schedules.
305.9
Aerosol spray for aircraft treatment schedules.
305.10
Treatment schedules for combination treatments.
305.11
Miscellaneous chemical treatments.
305.12-14
[Reserved]
Subpart—Cold Treatments
305.15
Treatment requirements.
305.16
Cold treatment schedules.
Subpart—Quick Freeze Treatments
305.17
Authorized treatments; exceptions.
305.18
Quick freeze treatment schedule.
305.19
[Reserved]
Subpart—Heat Treatments
305.20
Treatment requirements.
305.21
Hot water dip treatment schedule for mangoes.
305.22
Hot water immersion treatment schedules.
305.23
Steam sterilization treatment schedules.
305.24
Vapor heat treatment schedules.
305.25
Dry heat treatment schedules.
305.26
Khapra beetle treatment schedule for feeds and milled products.
305.27
Forced hot air treatment schedules.
305.28
Kiln sterilization treatment schedule.
305.29-305.30
[Reserved]
Subpart—Irradiation Treatments
305.31
Irradiation treatment of imported fruits and vegetables for certain fruit flies and mango seed weevils.
305.32
Irradiation treatment of regulated fruit to be moved interstate from areas quarantined for Mexican fruit fly.
305.33
Irradiation treatment of regulated articles to be moved interstate from areas quarantined for Mediterranean fruit fly.
305.34
Administrative instructions prescribing methods for irradiation treatment of certain fruits and vegetables from Hawaii.
305.35-305.39
[Reserved]
Subpart—Treatments for Garbage
305.40
Garbage treatment schedules for insect pests and pathogens.
305.41
[Reserved]
Subpart—Miscellaneous Treatments
305.42
Miscellaneous treatment schedules.
Start Authority

Authority: 7 U.S.C. 7701-7772; 21 U.S.C. 136 and 136a; 7 CFR 2.22, 2.80, and 371.3.

End Authority
Definitions.

The following definitions apply for the purposes of this part:

Administrator. The Administrator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, United States Department of Agriculture, or any person delegated to act for the Administrator in matters affecting this part.

APHIS. The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, United States Department of Agriculture.

Autoclaving. The introduction of steam at 212 °F into a pressurized enclosure containing a commodity to kill spores and other treatment-resistant pests.

Cold treatment. Exposure of a commodity to a specified cold temperature that is sustained for a specific time period to kill targeted pests, especially fruit flies.

Dose mapping. Measurement of absorbed dose within a process load using dosimeters placed at specified locations to produce a one-, two-, or three-dimensional distribution of absorbed dose, thus rendering a map of absorbed-dose values.

Dosimeter. A device that, when irradiated, exhibits a quantifiable change in some property of the device that can be related to absorbed dose in a given material using appropriate analytical instrumentation and techniques.

Dosimetry system. A system used for determining absorbed dose, consisting of dosimeters, measurement instruments and their associated reference standards, and procedures for the system's use.

Forced hot air. Hot air blown uniformly across commodities in a shipment until the pulp of each unit in the shipment of the commodity reaches a specified temperature.

Fumigant. A gaseous chemical that easily diffuses and disperses in air and is toxic to the target organism.

Fumigation. Releasing and dispersing a toxic chemical in the air so that it reaches the target organism in a gaseous state.

Hitchhiker pest. A pest that is carried by a commodity or a conveyance and, in the case of plants and plant products, does not infest those plants or plant products.

Hot water immersion dip. Complete immersion of a commodity in heated water to raise the temperature of the commodity to a specific temperature for a specified time. This treatment is usually used to kill fruit flies.

Inspector. Any individual authorized by the Administrator of APHIS or the Commissioner of Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security, to enforce the regulations in this part.

Irradiation. The use of irradiated energy to kill or devitalize organisms.

Methyl bromide. A colorless, odorless biocide used to fumigate a wide range of commodities.

Phosphine. Flammable gas generated from either aluminum phosphide or magnesium phosphide and used to treat stored product commodities.

Quick freeze. A commercially acceptable method of quick freezing at subzero temperatures with subsequent storage and transportation at not higher than 20 °F. Methods that accomplish this are known as quick freezing, sharp freezing, cold pack, or frozen pack, but may be any equivalent commercially acceptable freezing method.

Section 18 of Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA). An emergency exemption granted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to Federal or State agencies authorizing an unregistered use of a pesticide for a limited time.

Sulfuryl fluoride. An odorless, colorless, and nonflammable compressed fumigant that is used primarily to kill pests of wood.

Steam heat. The introduction of steam at 212 °F or higher into an enclosure containing a commodity to kill targeted organisms.

Vacuum fumigation. Fumigation performed in a gas-tight enclosure. Most Start Printed Page 33270air in the enclosure is removed and replaced with a small amount of fumigant. The reduction in pressure reduces the required duration of the treatment.

Vapor heat. Heated air saturated with water vapor and used to raise the temperature of a commodity to a required point for a specific period.

Approved treatments.

(a) Certain commodities or articles require treatment, or are subject to treatment, prior to the interstate movement within the United States or importation or entry into the United States. Treatment is required as indicated in parts 301, 318, and 319 of this chapter, on a permit, or by an inspector.

(1) Treatment schedules provided in this part must be followed to neutralize pests.

(2) More information about treatment schedules is contained in the Plant Protection and Quarantine (PPQ) Treatment Manual, which is available on the Internet at http://www.aphis.usda.gov/​ppq/​manuals/​online_​manuals.html or by contacting the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Plant Protection and Quarantine, Manuals Unit, 69 Thomas Johnson Drive, Suite 100, Frederick, MD 21702.

(3) Treatment requirements provided in this part must be followed to adequately administer treatment schedules.

(4) APHIS is not responsible for losses or damages incurred during treatment and recommends that a sample be treated first before deciding whether to treat the entire shipment.

(b) Alpha grass and handicrafts (Stipa tenacissima, Ampelodesmos mauritanicus). For treatment schedules, see § 305.6 for methyl bromide (MB) fumigation.

PestTreatment
Harmolita spp.MB T304-a or MB T304-b.

(c) Bags, bagging materials, and covers (used). The treatment schedules for which administration instructions are not provided are in § 305.6 for methyl bromide (MB) fumigation, § 305.23 for steam sterilization (SS), and § 305.25 for dry heat (DH).

Used materialPestTreatment
Bags and bagging material or covers used to contain root cropsGlobodera rostochiensisMB T306-a.
Bags and bagging used for commodities grown in soilPotato cyst nematodeMB T502-1.
Bags and bagging material or covers used for cotton onlyPectinophora spp.MB T306-b.
Bags and bagging used for small grainsDowny mildews and Physoderma diseases of maizeT503-1-2: Soak in water slightly below boiling (212 °F) for 1 hour; or SS T503-1-3; or DH T503-1-4.
Flag smutDH T504-1-1 or SS T504-1-2.
Bags and bagging material or coversTrogoderma granariumMB T306-c-1 or MB T306-c-2.
Bagging from unroasted coffee beansVariousMB T306-d-1 or MB T306-d-2.
Covers used for commodities grown in soilPotato cyst nematodeMB T502-2.
Covers used for small grainsDowny mildews and Physoderma diseases of maizeT503-2-2: Soak in water slightly below boiling (212 °F) for 1 hour; or SS T503-2-3; or DH T503-2-4.
Covers used for wheatFlag smutDH T504-2-1 or SS T504-2-2.

(d) Broomcorn and broomcorn articles. The treatment schedules for which administration instructions are not provided are in § 305.6 for methyl bromide (MB) fumigation and § 305.23 for steam sterilization (SS).

PestTreatment
Corn-related diseases (precautionary treatment)T566-1 (broomcorn) and T566-2 (broomcorn articles): Completely submerge in hot water at 102 °F.
Ostrinia nubilalis, ticks, and saw fliesMB T309-a or MB T309-b-1or MB T309-b-2 or SS T309-c.

(e) Cotton and cotton products. The treatment schedules for which administration instructions are not provided are in § 305.6 for methyl bromide (MB) fumigation and § 305.7 for phosphine (PH).

MaterialPestTreatment
Baled lint or lintersPectinophora sppMB T301-a-3.
Baled lint, linters, waste, piece goods, gin trashTrogoderma granariumMB T301-b-1-1 or MB T301-b-1-2.
Cottonseed (samples and bulk)Pectinophora sppT301-a-7: (1) Delint the cottonseed by applying sufficient heat (145 °F) or acid or both; or (2) raise the temperature of the delinted seed during the subsequent drying process to 145 °F for no less than 45 seconds or at least 140 °F for no less than 8 minutes.
Cottonseed, cottonseed products, or samplesT. granariumMB T301-b-2.
Cottonseed mealT. granariumMB T301-b-3.
Cotton and cotton productsGlobodera rostochiensisMB T301-c.
Cotton and cotton productsAnthonomus grandisMB T301-d-1-1 or PH T301-d-1-2.
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Lint, linters, cottonseed, cottonseed hulls, gin trash, waste, cottonseed meal, or other baled or bulk commodities (except samples)Pectinophora sppMB T301-a-1-1 or MB T301-a-1-2.
Lint, linters, and cottonseed (bulk, sacked, or packaged cottonseed, lint or linters, cottonseed hulls, gin trash, and all other baled or bulk cotton commodities)Pectinophora sppPH T301-a-6.
Lint (except baled lint or linters), cottonseed (except packaged cottonseed), cottonseed hulls, gin trash, waste, cottonseed meal, or other baled or bulk commodities (excluding samples)Pectinophora sppMB T301-a-2.
Packaged cottonseedPectinophora sppMB T301-a-4.
Samples of cotton and cotton productsPectinophora sppMB T301-a-5-1 or MB T301-a-5-2.

(f) Cut flowers and greenery. The treatment schedules for which administration instructions are not provided are in § 305.6 for methyl bromide (MB) fumigation.

PestTreatment
External feeders, leafminers, hitchhikers (except for snails and slugs), surface pestsMB T305-a.
Borers or soft scalesMB T305-b.
MealybugsMB T305-c.

(g) Equipment. The treatment schedules for which administration instructions are not provided are in § 305.6 for methyl bromide (MB) fumigation, § 305.9 for aerosol, and § 305.23 for steam sterilization (SS).

ArticlePestTreatment
AircraftTrogoderma granariumT409-a: Contact PPQ Regional Director for specific instructions.
Hitchhiker pests (other than T. granarium, fruit flies, and soft-bodied insects)Aerosol T409-b.
Fruit flies and soft-bodied insectsAerosol T409-c-1 or Aerosol T409-c-3.
AutomobilesGlobodera rostochiensisT406-c, steam cleaning: Steam at high pressure until all soil is removed. Treated surfaces must be thoroughly wet and heated.
Construction equipment with cabsG. rostochiensisMB T406-b.
Construction equipment without cabsG. rostochiensisSS T406-d.
ContainersG. rostochiensisMB T406-b.
ContainersPotato cyst nematodeMB T506-1.
Field and processing equipment (Saccharum)Xanthomonas albilineans and X. vasculorumT514-4: Remove all debris and soil from equipment with water at high pressure (300 pounds per square inch minimum) or with steam.
Mechanical cotton pickers and other cotton equipmentPectinophora gossypiellaMB T407.
Used farm equipment with cabsG. rostochiensisT406-c, steam cleaning: Steam at high pressure until all soil is removed. Treated surfaces must be thoroughly wet and heated.
Used farm equipment with cabsG. rostochiensisMB T406-b.
Used farm equipment without cabsG. rostochiensisSS T406-d.
Used containersG. rostochiensisSS T406-d.

(h) Fruits and vegetables. (1) Treatment of fruits and vegetables from foreign localities by irradiation in accordance with § 305.31 may be substituted for other approved treatments for the mango seed weevil Sternochetus mangiferae (Fabricus) or for one or more of the following 11 species of fruit flies: Anastrepha fraterculus, A. ludens, A. obliqua, A. serpentina, A. suspensa, Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, B. jarvisi, B. latifrons, and Ceratitis capitata.

(2) The treatment schedules for which administration instructions are not provided are in § 305.6 for methyl bromide (MB) fumigation, § 305.10(a) for methyl bromide fumigation and cold treatment (MB&CT), § 305.10(b) for cold treatment and methyl bromide fumigation (CT&MB), § 305.11 for miscellaneous chemical treatments (CMisc.), § 305.16 for cold treatment (CT), § 305.18 for quick freeze, § 305.21 for hot water dip (HWD), § 305.22 for hot water immersion (HWI), § 305.24 for vapor heat (VH), § 305.27 for forced hot air (FHA), §§ 305.31 through 305.34 for irradiation (IR), and § 305.42 for miscellaneous (Misc.).

(i) Treatment for shipments from foreign localities.

LocationCommodityPestTreatment schedule 1
AllAll imported fruits and vegetablesHitchhiker pests or surface pests, except mealybugsMB T104-a-1.
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MealybugsMB T104-a-2.
MostQuick freeze T110.
Acorns, chestnuts (see § 319.56-2b of this chapter)Cydia splendana and Curculio spp.MB T101-t-1 or MB T101-u-1.
BananaExternal feeders such as Noctuidae spp., Thrips spp., Copitarsia spp.MB T101-d-1.
BeetInternal feedersMB T101-g-1.
BeetExternal feedersMB T101-g-1-1.
BlackberryExternal feeders such as Noctuidae spp., Thrips spp., Copitarsia spp., Pentatomidae spp., and Tarsonemus spp.MB T101-h-1.
Broccoli (includes Chinese and rapini)External feeders and leafminersMB T101-n-2.
Brussel sproutsExternal feeders and leafminersMB T101-n-2.
Cabbage (European and Chinese)External feedersMB T101-j-1.
Cabbage (bok choy, napa, Chinese mustard)External feeders and leafminersMB T101-n-2.
CantaloupeExternal feedersMB T101-k-1.
CarrotExternal feedersMB T101-l-1.
CarrotInternal feedersMB T101-m-1.
CauliflowerExternal feeders and leafminersMB T101-n-2.
Celeriac (celery root)External feedersMB T101-n-1.
Celery (above ground parts)External feedersMB T101-o-1.
Chayote (fruit only)External feedersMB T101-p-1.
CherryInsects other than fruit fliesMB T101-r-1.
CherryRhagoletis indifferens and Cydia pomonellaMB T101-s-1.
Chicory (above ground parts)External feedersMB T101-v-1.
Chicory rootExternal feedersMB T101-n-1.
CopraExternal feedersMB T101-x-1.
Corn-on-the-cobOstrinia nubilalisMB T101-x-1-1.
CucumberExternal feedersMB T101-y-1.
DasheenExternal feedersMB T101-z-1.
DasheenInternal feedersMB T101-a-2.
Durian and other large fruits such as breadfruitExternal feedersMisc. T102-c.
EndiveExternal feedersMB T101-b-2.
Fava bean (dried)BruchidaeMB T101-c-2. MB T101-d-2.
GarlicBrachycerus spp. and Dyspessa ululaMB T101-e-2.
Ginger (rhizome)Internal feedersMB T101-f-2.
Ginger (rhizome)External feedersMB T101-g-2.
Grapefruit and other citrusAleurocanthus woglumiMB T101-j-2.
Herbs and spices (dried)Various stored product pests, except khapra beetleMB T101-n-2-1-1.
Herbs, fresh (includes all fresh plant parts except seeds)External feeders and leafminers.
KiwiExternal feeders, Nysius huttoniMB T101-m-2.
LeeksInternal feedersMB T101-q-2.
Lentils (dried)BruchidaeMB T101-e-1.
LitchiMealybugs (Pseudococcidae)MB T101-b-1-1.
LimeMealybugs and other surface pestsHWI T102-e.
Melon (including honeydew, muskmelon, and watermelon)External feeders such as Noctuidae spp., Thrips spp., Copitarsia spp.MB T101-o-2.
OnionInternal feeders and leafminersMB T101-q-2.
PapayaCercospora mamaonis and Phomopis carica-papayaeT561: Dip in hot water at 120.2 °F for 20 minutes.
ParsnipInternal feedersMB T101-g-1.
Peas (dried)BruchidaeMB T101-e-1.
Pecans and hickory nutsCurculio caryaeCT T107-g.
PeppersInternal pests (except fruit flies) and external pests (except mealybugs)MB T101-a-3.
PineappleInternal feedersMB T101-r-2
PlantainExternal feeders such as Noctuidae spp., Thrips spp., Copitarsia spp.MB T101-t-2.
Potato (white or Irish)Graphognathus spp.MB T101-u-2.
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Potato (white or Irish)Ostrinia nubilalis, Phthorimaea operculellaMB T101-v-2.
Pulses (dried)BruchidaeMB T101-e-1.
Pumpkin (includes calabaza varieties)External feedersMB T101-w-2.
RadishInternal feedersMB T101-g-1.
RaspberryExternal feeders such as Noctuidae spp., Thrips spp., Copitarsia spp.MB T101-x-2.
ShallotsInternal feeders including leafminersMB T101-q-2.
Squash (winter, summer, and chayote)External feedersMB T101-y-2.
Sweet potatoExternal and internal feedersMB T101-b-3-1.
StrawberryExternal feedersMB T101-z-2.
Tuna and other cactus fruitExternal feeders and leafminersMB T101-e-3.
TurnipInternal feedersMB T101-g-1.
Yam (see § 319.56-21 of this chapter)Internal and external feedersMB T101-f-3.
ZucchiniCeratitis capitata, Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalisVH T106-b-8.
ZucchiniExternal feedersMB T101-h-3.
AlbaniaHorseradishBaris lepidiiMB T101-l-2.
AlgeriaGrapeLobesia botranaMB T101-h-2.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB T101-h-2-1.
Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB T101-h-2-1.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
Grapefruit, tangerineCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Pear, plum, ethrogCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
Antigua and BarbudaBean (pod), pigeon pea (pod)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2.
Okra (pod)Pectinophora gossypiellaMB T101-p-2.
ArgentinaApple, apricot, cherry, kiwi, peach, pear, plum, nectarine, quince, pomegranateSpecies of Anastrepha (other than Anastrepha ludens), Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a-1.
BlueberryCeratitis capitataMB T101-i-1-1.
GrapeSpecies of Anastrepha (other than Anastrepha ludens), Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a-1.
Insects other than Ceratitis capitata and Lobesia botranaMB T101-i-2.
ArmeniaGrapeLobesia botranaMB T101-h-2.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a MB T101-h-2-1.
Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB T101-h-2-1.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
HorseradishBaris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
AustraliaAppleAustrotortrix spp. and Epiphyas spp., Bactrocera tryoni, Ceratitis capitata, and other fruit fliesCT&MB T109-d-1.
Bactrocera tryoniCT T107-d.
TortricidaeMB T101-a-1.
External feeders, apple mothMB T101-a-1.
AsparagusExternal feeders such as Noctuidae spp., Thrips spp. (except Scirtothrips dorsalis from Thailand), Copitarsia spp.MB T101-b-1.
Halotydeus destructorT101-b-1-1.
Citrus—oranges, grapefruits, limes, lemons, mandarins, satsumas, tangors, tangerines, and other fruits grown from this species or its hybrids (C. reticulata)Bactrocera tryoniCT T107-d.
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Citrus—oranges, grapefruits, limes lemons, mandarins, satsumas, tangors, tangerines, and other fruits grown from this species or its hybrids (C. reticulata)Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a.
GrapeAustrotortrix spp. and Epiphyas spp., Bactrocera tryoni, Ceratitis capitata, and other fruit fliesMB&CT T108-b or CT&MB T109-d-1.
KiwiBactrocera tryoniCT T107-d.
PearAustrotortrix spp., Epiphyas spp., Bactrocera tryoni, Ceratitis capitata, and other fruit fliesCT&MB and T109-d-1.
Bactrocera tryoniCT T107-d.
TortricidaeMB T101-a-1.
AustriaGrapeLobesia botranaMB T101-h-2.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB T101-h-2-1.
Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB T101-h-2-1.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
HorseradishBaris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
ArubaBean, garden (pod or shelled)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2 or MB T101-k-2-1.
Green beanCydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2.
AzerbaijanGrapeLobesia botranaMB T101-h-2.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB T101-h-2-1.
Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB T101-h-2-1.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
Horseradish (to Hawaii)Baris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
BahamasBean (pod)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2.
Okra (pod)Pectinophora gossypiellaMB T101-p-2.
Pigeon pea (pod)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2.
BarbadosBean (pod or shelled), pigeon pea (pod)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2.
Okra (pod)Pectinophora gossypiellaMB T101-p-2.
BelarusGrapeLobesia botranaMB T101-h-2.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB T101-h-2-1.
Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB T101-h-2-1.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
HorseradishBaris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
BelgiumBean, garden (pod or shelled), pea (pod or shelled)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2.
Horseradish (to Hawaii)Baris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
BelizeBean (pod or shelled), pigeon pea (pod or shelled)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2.
CarambolaSpecies of Anastrepha (other than Anastrepha ludens)CT T107-c.
EthrogCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
Grapefruit, orange, tangerineAnastrepha ludensCT T107-b.
PapayaCeratitis capitata, Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalisFHA T103-d-2 (see § 319.56-2(j) of this part).
BoliviaBlueberryCeratitis capitataMB T101-i-1-1.
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BosniaEthrogCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
HorseradishBaris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
BrazilApple, grape (prohibited into California)Species of Anastrepha (other than Anastrepha ludens), Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a-1.
MangoCeratitis capitata, Anastrepha spp., Anastrepha ludensHWD T102-a.
OkraPectinophora gossypiellaMB T101-p-2.
BulgariaGrapeLobesia botranaMB T101-h-2.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB T101-h-2-1.
Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB T101-h-2-1.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
HorseradishBaris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
Cayman IslandsBean (pod or shelled), pigeon pea (pod)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2.
Okra (pod)Pectinophora gossypiellaMB T101-p-2.
Chile (all provinces except provinces of Region 1 or Chanaral Township of Region 3)Apricot, nectarine, peach, plum, plumcotExternal feedersMB T101-a-3.
CherimoyaBrevipalpus chilensisMisc. T102-b (see § 319.56-2z of this chapter for additional treatment information)
GrapeExternal feedersMB T101-i-2-1.
Horseradish (to Hawaii)Baris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
Lemon (smooth skin)External feeders, Brevipalpus chilensisMB T101-n-2-1.
LimeBrevipalpus chilensisMisc. T102-b-1.
External feeders, Brevipalpus chilensisMB T101-n-2-1.
Passion fruitBrevipalpus chilensisMisc. T102-b-2.
TomatoExternal feedersMB T101-a-3.
Chile (all provinces of Region 1 or Chanaral Township of Region 3)Apple, cherry, pear, quinceCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
ApricotCeratitis capitata and external feedersCT T107-a and MB T101-a-3.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
AvocadoBactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
Babaco (fruit)Ceratitis capitata, Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalisVH T106-b-3.
External feedersMB T103-d-1.
BlueberryCeratitis capitataMB T101-i-1-1.
GrapeCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
External feedersMB T101-i-2-1.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
Horseradish (to Hawaii)Baris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
KiwiCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
Lemon (smooth skinned)External feeders, Brevipalpus chilensisMB T101-n-2-1.
LimeBrevipalpus chilensisMisc. T102-b-2.
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External feeders, Brevipalpus chilensisMB T101-n-2-1.
LoquatCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
MangoAnastrepha spp., Anastrepha ludens, Ceratitis capitataHWD T102-a.
Mountain papayaBactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, Ceratitis capitataVH T106-b-3 or FHA T103-d-1.
NectarineCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
External feedersMB T101-a-3.
PapayaBactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, Ceratitis capitataVH T106-b-4 or FHA T103-d-2.
PeachCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
External feedersMB T101-a-3.
Persimmon, sand pearCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Plum, plumcotCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
External feedersMB T101-a-3.
Opuntia spp.Ceratitis capitataMB T101-d-3.
TomatoScrobipalpula absoluta, Rhagoletis tomatisMB T101-c-3-1.
ChinaLitchiBactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, Conopomorpha sinensisCT T107-h.
LonganBactrocera dorsalis and B. curcubitaeCT T107-j.
Pear (Ya variety), Shandong Province onlyBactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, Eutetranychus orientalisCT T107-f.
Sand pearBactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, Eutetranychus orientalisCT T107-f.
ColombiaBean, gardenCydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2 or MB T101-k-2-1.
Cape gooseberryCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
GrapeSpecies of Anastrepha (other than Anastrepha ludens)CT T107-c.
Grapefruit, orange, plum, tangerine, pomegranateAnastrepha ludensCT T107-b.
OkraPectinophora gossypiellaMB T101-p-2.
TunaCeratitis capitataMB T101-d-3.
Yellow pitayaCeratitis capitata and Anastrepha fraterculusVH T106-e.
Costa RicaBean, gardenCydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2 or MB T101-k-2-1.
Bean, lima (pod or shelled), pigeon pea (pod or shelled)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leaf minersMB T101-k-2.
EthrogCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Bactrocera MB&CT cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaT108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
Grapefruit, orange, tangerineAnastrepha ludensCT T107-b.
MangoCeratitis capitata, Anastrepha spp., Anastrepha ludensHWD T102-a.
CroatiaEthrogCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
HorseradishBaris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
CyprusEthrogCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
GrapeLobesia botranaMB T101-h-2.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB T101-h-2-1.
Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB T101-h-2-1.
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Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
Grapefruit, orange, tangerineCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Czech RepublicHorseradishBaris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
DenmarkHorseradish (to Hawaii)Baris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
DominicaBean (pod), pigeon pea (pod)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2.
Okra (pod)Pectinophora gossypiellaMB T101-p-2.
Dominican RepublicBean (pod)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2.
Goa bean (pod or shelled)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leaf minersMB T101-k-2.
GrapeSpecies of Anastrepha (other than Anastrepha ludens)CT T107-c.
Hyacinth beanCydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leaf minersMB T101-k-2-1.
Pigeon pea (pod or shelled)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, Melanagromyza obtusa and leaf minersMB T101-k-2 or MB T101-k-2-1.
Okra (pod)Pectinophora gossypiellaMB T101-p-2.
Yard long bean (pod)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2.
EcuadorAppleSpecies of Anastrepha (other than Anastrepha ludens), Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a-1.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
Bean (pod or shelled), pigeon pea (pod or shelled)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2.
BlueberryCeratitis capitataMB T101-i-1-1.
EthrogCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
Grapefruit, orange, tangerineSpecies of Anastrepha (other than Anastrepha ludens), Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a-1.
MangoCeratitis capitata, Anastrepha spp., Anastrepha ludensHWD T102-a.
OkraPectinophora gossypiellaMB T101-p-2.
Pea (pod)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2 or MB T101-k-2-1.
EgyptGrapeLobesia botranaMB T101-h-2.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB T101-h-2-1.
Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB T101-h-2-1.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
OrangeCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Pea (pod or shelled)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2 or MB T101-k-2-1.
PearCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
El SalvadorBean, garden and limaCydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2 or MB T101-k-2-1.
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EthrogCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
Grapefruit, orange, tangerineAnastrepha ludensCT T107-b.
Pigeon pea (pod or shelled)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2.
EstoniaGrapeLobesia botranaMB T101-h-2.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB T101-h-2-1.
Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB T101-h-2-1.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
HorseradishBaris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
FinlandHorseradish (to Hawaii)Baris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
FranceApple, pearCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Ethrog, kiwiCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
GrapeLobesia botranaMB T101-h-2.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB T101-h-2-1.
Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB T101-h-2-1.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
Horseradish (to Hawaii)Baris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
Georgia, Republic ofGrapeLobesia botranaMB T101-h-2.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB T101-h-2-1.
Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB T101-h-2-1.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
HorseradishBaris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
GermanyGrapeLobesia botranaMB T101-h-2.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB T101-h-2-1.
Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB T101-h-2-1.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, E B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
HorseradishBaris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
Greece (includes Rhodes)GrapeLobesia botranaMB T101-h-2.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB T101-h-2-1.
Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB T101-h-2-1.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
HorseradishBaris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
Kiwi, tangerine, ethrogCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
Orange, pomegranateCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
GrenadaBean (pod)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulais, and leafminersMB T101-k-2.
OkraPectinophora gossypiellaMB T101-p-2.
Pigeon pea (pod or shelled)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminrsMB T101-k-2.
Guadeloupe, Dept of (FR) and St. BarthelemyOkra (pod)Pectinophors gossypiellaMB T101-p-2.
Pigeon pea (pod or shelled), bean (pod)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2.
GuatemalaEthrogCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
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Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
Grapefruit, orange, plum, tangerineAnastrepha ludensCT T107-b.
MangoCeratitis capitata, Anastrepha spp., Anastrepha ludensHWD T102-a.
Okra (pod)Pectinophora gossypiellaMB T101-p-2.
Pigeon pea (pod or shelled)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2.
TunaCeratitis capitataMB T101-d-3.
GuyanaApple, orangeSpecies of Anastrepha (other than Anastrepha ludens)CT T107-c.
Bean (pod or shelled)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2.
Okra (pod)Pectinophora gossypiellaMB T101-p-2.
HaitiApricot, pomegranateSpecies of Anastrepha (other than Anastrepha ludens)CT T107-c.
MangoCeratitis capitata, Anastrepha spp., Anastrepha ludensHWD T102-a.
Bean (pod), pigeon pea (pod or shelled)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2.
Okra (pod)Pectinophora gossypiellaMB T101-p-2.
HungaryGrapeLobesia botranaMB T101-h-2.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB T101-h-2-1.
Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB T101-h-2-1.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
HorseradishBaris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
IndiaLitchi (fruit)Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis Eutetranychus orientalisCT T107-f.
Israel (includes Gaza)Apple, apricot, nectarine, peach, pear, plumCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
AvocadoBactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, Ceratitis capitataMB T101-c-1.
Brassica oleraceaExternal feeders and leafminersMB T101-n-2.
EthrogCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
GrapeLobesia botranaMB T101-h-2.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB T101-h-2-1.
Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB T101-h-2-1.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
Grapefruit, litchi, loquat, orange, persimmon, pomegranate, pummelo, tangerineCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Horseradish root (to Hawaii)Baris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
Lettuce (leaf), field grownExternal feeders and leafminersMB T101-n-2.
Pea (pod or shelled)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2.
Tuna (fruit)Ceratitis capitataMB T101-d-3.
ItalyEthrog (North Atlantic ports only)Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a.
GrapeLobesia botranaMB T101-h-2.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB T101-h-2-1.
Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB T101-h-2-1.
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Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
Grapefruit, orange, persimmon, tangerineCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
HorseradishBaris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
Kiwi (fruit)Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
Pea (pod or shelled)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2.
Tuna (fruit)Ceratitis capitataMB T101-d-3.
JamaicaBean (pod), pigeon pea (pod)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2.
Ivy gourd (fruit)Cydia, fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testullis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2.
Okra (pod)Pectinophora gossypiellaMB T101-p-2.
ThymeExternal feeders and leafminersMB T101-n-2.
Japan (includes Bonian Island, Ryukyu, Island Ryukyu Island, Tokara Island, Volcano Islands)Apple (Fuji only)Carposina niponensis, Conogethes punctiferalis, Tetranychus viennensis, T. kanzawaiCT&MB T109-a-1 or T109-a-2.
Cabbage (to Hawaii)External feeders and leafminersMB T101-n-2.
Horseradish (to Hawaii)Baris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
JordanApple, persimmonCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
GrapeLobesia botranaMB T101-h-2.
Ceratitis capitata,CT T107-a or MB T1011-h-2-l.
Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB T101-h-2-1.
KazakhstanGrapeLobesia botranaMB T101-h-2.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB T101-h-2-1.
Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB T101-h-2-1.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
HorseradishBaris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
Korea, Republic of (South)Apple (Fuji only)Carposina niponensis, Conogethes punctiferalis, Tetranychus viennensis, T. kanzawaiCT&MB T109-a-1 or T109-a-2.
KyrgyzstanGrapeLobesia botranaMB T101-h-2.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB T101-h-2-1.
Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB T101-h-2-1.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
HorseradishBaris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
LatviaGrapeLobesia botranaMB T101-h-2.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB T101-h-2-1.
Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB T101-h-2-1.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tyroni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
HorseradishBaris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
LebanonAppleCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
LibyaGrapeLobesia botranaMB T101-h-2.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB T101-h-2-1.
Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB T101-h-2-1.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
LithuaniaGrapeLobesia botranaMB T101-h-2.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB T101-h-2-1.
Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB T101-h-2-1.
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Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
HorseradishBaris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
LuxembourgGrapeLobesia botranaMB T101-h-2.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB T101-h-2-1.
Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB T101-h-2-1.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
MacedoniaEthrogCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
HorseradishBaris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
Martinique, Dept. of (FR)EthrogCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
HorseradishBaris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
MexicoApple, cherry, peach, plum, tangerineAnastrepha ludensCT T107-b.
Brassica spp., Chenopodium spp., cilantroExternal feeders such as Noctuidae spp., Thrips spp. (except Scirtothrips dorsalis from Thailand), Copitarsia spp.MB T101-b-1.
CarambolaSpecies of Anastrepha (other than Anastrepha ludens)CT T107-c.
GrapefruitAnastrepha ludensCT T107-b.
Anastrepha spp.MB T101-j-2-1 or FHA T103-a-1 or VH T106-a-2.
HorseradishBaris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
MangoAnastrepha ludensVH T106-a-3.
Ceratitis capitata, Anastrepha spp., Anastrepha ludensHWD T102-a.
Anastrepha ludens, Anastrepha obliqua, Anastrepha serpentinaFHA T103-c-1.
OkraPectinophora gossypiellaMB T101-p-2.
OrangeAnastrepha ludensCT T107-b.
Anastrepha spp.MB T101-j-2-1 or FHA T103-a-1.
Anastrepha spp. (includes Anastrepha ludens)VH T106-a-4.
Pigeon pea (pod or shelled), bean (pod or shelled)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalisMB T101-k-2.
TangerineAnastrepha spp.MB T101-j-2-1 or FHA T103-a-1 or VH T106-a-1 or VH T106-a-1-1.
MoldovaGrapeLobesia botranaMB T101-h-2.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB T101-h-2-1.
Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB T101-h-2-1.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
HorseradishBaris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
MontserratBean (pod), pigeon pea (pod)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2.
OkraPectinophora gossypiellaMB T101-p-2.
MoroccoApricot, peach, pear, plumCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
Cipollino (bulb/wild onion)Exosoma lusitanicaMB T101-w-1.
EthrogCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
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Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
GrapeLobesia botranaMB T101-h-2.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB T101-h-2-1.
Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB T101-h-2-1.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
Grapefruit, orange, tangerineCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Netherlands, Kingdom ofBean, gardenCydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2.
Horseradish (to Hawaii)Baris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
Netherlands Antilles (includes Bonaire, Curacao, Saba, St. Eustatius)Bean (pod or shelled), pigeon pea (pod or shelled)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2.
New ZealandAppleTortricidaeMB T101-a-1.
AsparagusHalotydeus destructorMB T101-b-1-1.
PearTortricidaeMB T101-a-1.
NicaraguaFaba bean (pod), green bean (pod), mung bean (pod), pea (pod)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2 or MB T101-k-2-1.
MangoCeratitis capitata, Anastrepha spp., A. ludensHWD T102-a.
Yard-long-bean (pod)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, and Maruca testulalisMB T101-k-2 or MB T101-k-2-1.
NorwayHorseradish (to Hawaii)Baris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
Panama and canal zoneBean (garden) and lima (pod)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2 or MB T101-k-2-1.
EthrogCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
Grapefruit, orange, tangerineAnastrepha ludensCT T107-b.
Pigeon pea (pod or shelled)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2.
PeruAsparagusExternal feedersMB T101-b-1.
Bean (pod or shelled)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2.
BlueberryCeratitis capitataMB T101-i-1-1.
GrapeSpecies of Anastrepha (other than Anastrepha ludens), Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a-1.
MangoCeratitis capitata, Anastrepha spp., Anastrepha ludensHWD T102-a.
Okra (pod)Pectinophora gossypiellaMB T101-p-2.
PhilippinesAvocadoBactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, Ceratitis capitataMB T101-c-1.
MangoBactrocera occipitalis and B. philippinensisVH T106-d-1.
PolandHorseradishBaris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
Portugal (includes Azores)Bean, faba (pod or shelled)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2.
EthrogCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
GrapeLobesia botranaMB T101-h-2.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB T101-h-2-1.
Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB T101-h-2-1.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
Horseradish (to Hawaii)Baris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
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RomaniaGrapeLobesia botranaMB T101-h-2.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB T101-h-2-1.
Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB T101-h-2-1.
Ceratitis capitata, Eutetranychus orientalisCT T107-a.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
HorseradishBaris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
Russian FederationGrapeLobesia botranaMB T101-h-2.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB T101-h-2-1.
Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB T101-h-2-1.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
HorseradishBaris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
Saint Kitts and NevisBean (pod), pigeon pea (pod)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2.
Okra (pod)Pectinophora gossypiellaMB T101-p-2.
Saint LuciaBean (pod), pigeon pea (pod)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2.
St. Martin (France and Netherlands)Okra (pod)Pectinophora gossypiellaMB T101-p-2.
Saint Vincent and the GrenadinesBean (pod), pigeon pea (pod)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2.
Okra (pod)Pectinophora gossypiellaMB T101-p-2.
SenegalBean, garden (pod or shelled)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2 or MB T101-k-2-1.
SlovakiaHorseradishBaris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
SloveniaEthrogCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
HorseradishBaris lepidiiMB T101-l-2.
South AfricaApple, grape, pearCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Nectarine, peach, plumCryptophlebia leucotreta and Pterandrus rosaCT T107-e.
Citrus (fruit, Western Cape Province only)Cryptophlebia leucotreta and Pterandrus rosaCT T107-e.
SpainAppleCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
EthrogCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
GrapeLobesia botranaMB T101-h-2.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB T101-h-2-1.
Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB T101-h-2-1.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
Grapefruit, loquat, orange, tangerineCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
HorseradishBaris lepidiiMB T101-l-2.
KiwiCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Lettuce (above ground parts)External feeders and leafminersMB T101-n-2.
Ortanique (fruit)Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Persimmon (fruit)Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a.
SurinameBean (pod or shelled)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2.
Okra (pod)Pectinophora gossypiellaMB T101-p-2.
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SwedenHorseradish (to Hawaii)Baris lepidiiMB T101-l-2.
SwitzerlandGrapeLobesia botranaMB T101-h-2.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB T101-h-2-1.
Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB T101-h-2-1.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
Horseradish (to Hawaii)Baris lepidiiMB T101-l-2.
Syrian Arab RepublicEthrogCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&T T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
GrapeLobesia botranaMB T101-h-2.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB T101-h-2-1.
Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB T101-h-2-1.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
TaiwanCarambolaBactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, Eutetranychus orientalisCT T107-f.
Horseradish (to Hawaii)Baris lepidiiMB T101-l-2.
Litchi (including clusters of fruit attached to a stem)Bactrocera dorsalis, B. cucurbitae, Conopomorpha sinensisCT T107-h.
MangoBactrocera dorsalisVH T106-d.
TajikistanHorseradishBaris lepidiiMB T101-l-2.
GrapeLobesia botranaMB T101-h-2.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB T101-h-2-1.
Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB T101-h-2-1.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
ThailandAsparagus (shoot)Scirtothrips dorsalisMB T101-b-1-1.
Trinidad and TobagoBean (shelled), pigeon pea (shelled)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2.
Grapefruit, orange, tangerineSpecies of Anastrepha (other than Anastrepha ludens)CT T107-c.
Okra, rosellePectinophora gossypiellaMB T101-p-2.
TunisiaEthrogCeratitis capitataCT T107-a
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
GrapeLobesia botranaMB T101-h-2.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB T101-h-2-1.
Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB T101-h-2-1.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
Grapefruit, orange, tangerineCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Peach, pear, plumCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
TurkeyEthrogCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
GrapeLobesia botranaMB T101-h-2.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB T101-h-2-1.
Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB T101-h-2-1.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
OrangeCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
TurkmenistanGrapeLobesia botranaMB T101-h-2.
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Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB T101-h-2-1.
Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB T101-h-2-1.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
HorseradishBaris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
UkraineGrapeLobesia botranaMB T101-h-2.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB T101-h-2-1.
Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB T101-h-2-1.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
HorseradishBaris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
United Kingdom (includes Channel Islands, Shetland Island)Horseradish (to Hawaii)Baris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
UruguayApple, nectarine, peach pear, plumSpecies of Anastrepha (other than Anastrepha ludens), Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a-1.
GrapeLobesia botranaMB T101-h-2.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB T101-h-2-1.
Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB T101-h-2-1.
UzbekistanGrapeLobesia botranaMB T101-h-2.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB T101-h-2-1.
Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB T101-h-2-1.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Brevipalpus chilensis, Ceratitis capitata, Lobesia botranaMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
HorseradishBaris lepidiiMB T101-1-2.
VenezuelaBean (pod or shelled), pigeon pea (pod or shelled)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalisMB T101-k-2 or MB T101-k-2-1.
Grape, grapefruit, orange, tangerineSpecies of Anastrepha (other than Anastrepha ludens), Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a-1.
MangoCeratitis capitata, Anastrepha spp., Anastrepha ludensHWD T102-a.
OkraPectinophora gossypiellaMB T101-p-2.
ZimbabweApple, kiwi, pearCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Apricot, nectarine, peach, plumCryptophlebia leucotreta and Pterandrus rosaCT T107-e.
1 Treatment by irradiation in accordance with § 305.31 may be substituted for other approved treatments for the mango seed weevil Sternochetus mangiferae (Fabricus) or for one or more of the following 11 species of fruit flies: Anastrepha fraterculus, A. ludens, A. obliqua, A. serpentina, A. suspensa, Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, B. jarvisi, B. latifrons, and Ceratitis capitata.

(ii) Treatment for shipments from U.S. quarantine localities.

LocationCommodityPestTreatment schedule
Areas in the United States under Federal quarantine for the listed pestFruit of the genera Citrus and Fortunella and of the species Clausena lansium and Poncirus trifoliataXanthomonas axonopodis pv. citriCMisc. CC1 or CMisc. CC2.
Any fruit listed in § 301.64-2(a) of this chapterAnastrepha ludensIR.
Any article listed in § 301.78-2(a) of this chapterCeratitis capitataIR.
AppleAnastrepha ludensCT T107-b.
Anastrepha spp. (other than A. ludens)CT T107-a-1 or CT T107-c.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, Ceratitis capitataMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB&CT T108-b.
ApricotAnastrepha ludensCT T107-b.
Bactrocera dorsalis, Ceratitis capitataMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a.
AvocadoBactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, Ceratitis capitataMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
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Bell pepperBactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, Ceratitis capitataVH T106-b-1.
CherryBactrocera dorsalis, Ceratitis capitataMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a.
CitronsAnastrepha ludensCT T107-b.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a.
CitrusAnastrepha ludensFHA T103-a-1.
Anastrepha spp. (other than A. ludens)CT T107-a-1, CT T107-c.
Bactrocera dorsalisMB&CTOFF or CT&MBOFF.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB T101-w-1-2.
Citrus fruit regulated under § 301.78-2(a) of this chapterCeratitis capitataMB&CTMedfly or CTMedfly.
Citrus fruit regulated under § 301.99-2(b) of this chapterAnastrepha serpentinaMBSFF.
EggplantBactrocera cucurbitae, Ceratitis capitataVH T106-b-2.
GrapeBactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, Ceratitis capitataCT T107-f or MB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
Bactrocera dorsalisMB&CTOFF or CT&MBOFF.
Ceratitis capitataMB T101-h-2-1 or CT T107-a or MB&CT T108-b.
GrapefruitAnastrepha ludensCT T107-b or MB T101-j-2-1 or FHA T103-a-1.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a.
KiwiCeratitis capitataCT T107-a or MB T101-m-2-1 or MB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
LitchiAnastrepha ludensCT T107-b.
LonganAnastrepha ludensCT T107-b.
Bactrocera dorsalisCT T107-h.
LoquatCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
NectarineBactrocera dorsalisMB&CT T108-a-1or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or CT T107-c or MB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
OkraPectinophora gossypiellaMB T101-p-2.
OrangeAnastrepha ludensCT T107-b MB T101-j-2-1 orFHA T103-a-1.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or CT T107-c.
Optunia cactus (Optunia spp.)Ceratitis capitataMB T101-d-3.
PapayaBactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, Ceratitis capitataVH T106-c VH T106-b-4 or.
PeachAnastrepha ludensCT T107-b.
Anastrepha spp. (other than A. ludens)CT T107-a-1.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, Ceratitis capitataMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or T107-c.
PearAnastrepha ludensCT T107-b.
Anastrepha spp. (other than A. ludens)CT T107-a-1.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, Ceratitis capitataMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or CT T107-c or MB&CT T108-b.
Pepper, bellBactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, Ceratitis capitataVH T106-b-1.
PersimmonsAnastrepha ludensCT T107-b.
Pineapple (other than smooth Cayenne)Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, Ceratitis capitataVH T106-b-5.
PlumAnastrepha ludensCT T107-b.
Bactrocera dorsalisMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or CT T107-c or MB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
PomegranateAnastrepha ludensCT T107-b.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a or CT T107-c.
PummeloCeratitis capitataCT T107-a.
QuinceAnastrepha ludensCT T107-b.
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Anastrepha spp. (other than A. ludensCT T107-a-1.
Bactrocera dorsalisMB&CT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a.
SquashBactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalisVH T106-b-6.
TomatoBactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, Ceratitis capitataVH T106-b-7.
Bactrocera dorsalisMBOFF.
Ceratitis capitataMB T101-c-3.
White sapoteAnastrepha ludensCT T107-b.
HawaiiAbiuBactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, Ceratitis capitataIR.
AtemoyaBactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, Ceratitis capitataIR.
AvocadoBactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, Ceratitis capitataMB T101-c-1.
Ceratitis capitataCT T107-a.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, Ceratitis capitata, Brevipalpus chiliensis, and Lobesia botranaCT T108-a-1 or T108-a-2 or T108-a-3.
Bell pepperBactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, Ceratitis capitataIR or VH T106-b-1.
CarambolaBactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, Ceratitis capitataIR.
CitrusBactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, Ceratitis capitataFHA T103-b-1.
EggplantBactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, Ceratitis capitataIR or VH T106-b-2.
LitchiBactrocera or dorsalis, Ceratitis capitataHWI T102-d or VH T106-f.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, Ceratitis capitataIR.
LonganBactrocera dorsalis, Ceratitis capitataHWI T102-d-1.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, Ceratitis capitataIR.
MangoBactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, Ceratitis capitataIR.
PapayaBactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, Ceratitis capitataVH T106-b-4 or VH T106-c or FHA T103-d-2 or IR.
Pineapple (other than smooth Cayenne)Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, Ceratitis capitataIR or VH T106-b-5.
RambutanBactrocera dorsalis, Ceratitis capitataFHA T103-e or VH T106-g.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, Ceratitis capitataIR.
SapodillaBactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, Ceratitis capitataIR.
Squash, ItalianBactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, Ceratitis capitataIR or VH T106-b-6.
Sweet potatoEuscepes postfasciatus, Omphisa anastomosalis, Elytrotreinus subtruncatusMB T101-b-3-1 or IR.
TomatoCeratitis capitataVH T106-b-5 or MB T101-c-3.
Bactrocera cucurbitae, B. dorsalis, Ceratitis capitataIR or VH T106-b-7.
Puerto RicoBeans (string, lima, faba) and pigeon peas (fresh shelled or in the pod)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, Melanagromyza obtusa, and leafminersMB T101-k-2 or MB T101-k-2-1.
Citrus fruits (orange, grapefruit, lemon, citron, and lime)Anastrepha obliquaCT T107-c.
MangoAnastrepha spp., Ceratitis capitataHWD T102-a.
Okra (pod)Pectinophora gossypiellaMB T101-p-2.
Sweet potatoExternal and internal feedersMB T101-b-3-1.
Pigeon pea (pod or shelled)Cydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2.
Virgin IslandsBeans (string, lima, faba) and pigeon peas, in the podCydia fabivora, Epinotia aporema, Maruca testulalis, and leafminersMB T101-k-2 or MB T101-k-2-1.
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Citrus fruits (orange, grapefruit, lemon, citron, and lime)Anastrepha obliquaCT T107-c.
MangoAnastrepha spp., Ceratitis capitataHWD T102-a.
Okra (pod)Pectinophora gossypiellaMB T101-p-2.
Sweet potatoExternal and internal feedersMB T101-b-3-1.

(i) Garbage. For treatment of garbage, see § 305.33.

(j) Grains and seeds not intended for propagation. The treatment schedules for which administration instructions are not provided are in § 305.6 for methyl bromide (MB) fumigation, § 305.23 for steam sterilization (SS), and § 305.25 for dry heat (DH).

Plant materialPestTreatment schedule
AcornsCydia splendana and Curculio sppMB T302-g-1 or MB T302-g-2.
Corn seed (commercial lots)Various corn-related diseasesSS T510-1.
Ear cornBorersMB T302-a-1-1 or DH T302-a-1-2.
Grains and seeds (guar “gum”)Trogoderma granariumMB T302-c-1 or MB T302-c-3.
Grains and seedsTrogoderma granariumMB T302-c-2.
Grains and seeds contaminated with cotton seedPectinophora sppMB T301-a-1-1 or MB T301-a-1-2.
Grains and seedsInsects other than Trogoderma granariumMB T302-e-1 or MB T302-e-2.
Grains and seeds excluding Rosmarinus seedSnailsT302-f: Remove snails through separation by screening or hand removal. If not feasible, an inspector will deny entry or treat with appropriate schedule (See miscellaneous cargo in paragraph (m) of this section.).
Shelled corn contaminated with cottonseed. (Do not use shelled corn treated with T301 for food or feed.)Pectinophora sppMB T302-b-1-2 (See MB T301-a-1-1 or MB T301-a-1-2.).

(k) Hay, baled. For treatment of baled hay for Mayetiola destructor, see the phosphine treatment schedule T311 in § 305.7.

(l) Khapra beetle.

(1) For the heat treatment of feeds and milled products that are heated as a part of the processing procedure, or for other commodities that can be subjected to heat, and that are infested with khapra beetle, see treatment schedule T307-a in § 305.26.

(2) See treatment schedule T306-c-1 in § 305.6 for finely ground oily meals and flour.

(3) See also specific articles where the pest is Trogoderma granarium (khapra beetle).

(4) See treatment schedule T302-g-1 in § 305.6 for sorptive materials.

(m) Miscellaneous (nonfood, nonfeed commodities or articles). The treatment schedules for which administration instructions are not provided are in § 305.6 for methyl bromide (MB) fumigation, § 305.8 for sulfuryl fluoride, § 305.16 for cold treatment (CT), and § 305.23 for steam sterilization (SS).

MaterialPestTreatment schedule
Brassware from Bombay (Mumbai), IndiaTrogoderma granariumMB T413-a or MB T413-b.
Inanimate, nonfood articlesGypsy moth egg massesMB T414.
Miscellaneous cargo (nonfood, nonfeed commodities)Quarantine significant snails of the family Achatinidae, including Achatina, Archachatina, Lignus, LimicolariaMB T402-a-1 or CT T403-a-6-3.
Quarantine significant snails of the family Hygromiidae, including the following genera: Canidula, Cernuella, Cochlicella, Helicella, Helicopsis, Monacha, Platytheba, Pseudotrichia, Trochoidea, Xerolenta, Xeropicta, Xerosecta, XerotrichaMB T403-a-2-1 or MB T403-a-2-2 or CT T403-a-2-3.
Quarantine significant slugs of the families Agriolimacidae, Arionidae, Limacidae, Milacidae, Philomycidae, Veronicellidae, including the following genera: Agriolimax, Arion, Colosius, Deroceras, Diplosolenodes, Leidyula, Limax, Meghimatium, Milax, Pallifera, Pseudoveronicella, Sarasinula, Semperula, Vaginulus, VeronicellaMB T403-a-3.
Quarantine significant snails of the family Helicidae, including the following genera: Caracollina, Cepaea, Cryptomphalus, Helix, Otala, ThebaMB T403-a-4-1 or MB T403-a-4-2 or CT T403-a-4-3.
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Quarantine significant snails of the families Bradybaenidae and Succineidae, including the following genera: Bradybaena, Cathaica, Helicostyla, Omaloynyx, Succinea, TrishoplitaMB T403-a-5-1 or MB T403-a-5-2, or CT T403-a-5-3.
Quarantine significant snails sensitive to cold treatment. Members of the families Bradybaenidae, Helicidae, Helicellidae, Hygromiidae, and Succineidae, including the following genera: Bradybaena, Candidula, Cepaea, Cathaica, Cernuella, Cochlicella, Helicella, Helicostyla, Theba, Trishoplita, Trochoidea, Xerolenta, Xeropicta, Xerosecta, XerotrichaCT T403-a-6-1.
Quarantine significant snails sensitive to cold treatment, certain members of the family Helicidae, including the genera Helix and OtalaCT T403-a-6-2.
Quarantine significant snails sensitive to cold treatment of the family Achatinidae, including the genera Achatina, Archachatina, Lignus, LimicolariaCT T403-a-6-3.
Globodera rostochiensisMB T403-c.
Trogoderma granariumMB T401-b or MB T402-b-2.
Wood borers or termitesSee treatments for wood products in paragraph (y) of this section.
Pieris spp. (all life stages of cabbageworms) and all other Lepidoptera, hitchhiking insects, including other than LepidopteraMB T403-f.
Miscellaneous cargo (nonfood, nonfeed commodities) that is sorptive or difficult to penetrateQuarantine significant insects not specifically provided for elsewhere in nonfood or nonfeed commoditiesMB T403-e-1-1 or MB T403-e-1-2.
Miscellaneous cargo (nonfood, nonfeed commodity) that is not sorptive or difficult to penetrateQuarantine significant pests other than insects (including snails of the families Helicarionidae, Streptacidae, Subulinidae, and Zonitidae, as well as other noninsect pests)MB T403-e-2.
Nonfood materialsTicksMB T310-a or MB T310-b or sulfuryl fluoride T310-d.
Nonplant articlesPotato cyst nematodeMB T506-2-1 or SS T506-2-3.
Nonplant productsAntsMB T411.

(n) Plants, bulbs, corms, tubers, rhizomes, and roots. The treatment schedules for which administration instructions are not provided are in § 305.6 for methyl bromide (MB) fumigation, § 305.10 for combination (COM), and § 305.42(c) for miscellaneous (Misc.).

Plant materialPestTreatment schedule
Anchusa, Astilbe, Clematis, Dicentra, Gardenia, Helleborus, Hibiscus, Kniphofia, PrimulaLesion nematodes (Pratylenchus spp.)T553-2: Hot water dip at 118 °F for 30 minutes.
AcalyphaPratylenchus sppT570-1: Hot water dip at 110 °F for 50 minutes.
AconitumAphelenchoides fragariae sppT570-2: Hot water dip at 110 °F for 50 minutes.
Allium, Amaryllis, and bulbsBulb nematodes: Ditylenchus dipsaci, D. destructorT552-1: Presoak bulbs in water at 75 °F for 2 hours, then at 110-111 °F for 4 hours.
AmaryllisDitylenchus destructorT565-1: Hot water dip at 110 °F for 4 hours immediately after digging.
Aquatic plantsSnails of the families: Ampullariidae, Bulinidae, Lymnaeidae, Planorbidae, ViviparidaeT201-q: Hot water treatment at 112 °F for 10 minutes. (Elodea, Danes, and Cabomba caroliniana plants not tolerant to this treatment.)
Armoracea (horseradish roots), bulbs (not specifically provided for)Globodera rostochiensis and G. pallidaT553-3: Hot water dip at 118 °F for 30 minutes.
Astilbe, Bletilla hyacinthina, Cimicifuga, Epimedium pinnatum, Hosta, PaeoniaAphelenchoides besseyiT564-1: Presoak in water at 68 °F for 1 hour followed by hot water soak at 110 °F for 1 hour. Then dip in cold water and let dry.
Astilbe rootsBrachyrhinus larvaeMB T202-b.
AzaleaChrysomyxa sppT501-1: Remove infested parts and treat all plants of same species in shipment with 4-4-50 Bordeaux dip or spray.
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Azalea hybridChrysomyxa sppT501-2: Remove infested parts and treat all plants of same species in shipment with 4-4-50 Bordeaux dip or spray; or T505-1-1: Treat with mancozeb or other approved fungicide of equal effectiveness according to the label.
Banana rootsExternal feedersT202-c: Pretreatment at 110 °F for 30 minutes. Then, hot water dip at 120 °F for 60 minutes.
BegoniaAphelenchoides fragariaeT559-1: Dip in hot water at 118 °F for 5 minutes.
Bletilla hyacinthinaAphelenchoides fragariaeT553-4: Dip in hot water at 118 °F for 30 minutes.
BromeliadsExternal feedersMB T201-e-1.
Internal feeders such as borers and minersMB T201-e-2.
Phyllosticta bromeliae Uredo sppT507-1: Remove infested leaves and treat all plants of same species in shipment with Captan following label directions.
Cacti and other succulentsExternal feeders (other than soft scales) infesting collected dormant and nondormant plant materialMB T201-f-1.
Borers and soft scalesMB T201-f-2.
Calla (rhizomes)Meloidogyne sppT556-1: Dip in hot water at 122 °F for 30 minutes.
Camellia (light infestation)Cylindrosporium camelliaeLight infestation: T509-1-1: Remove infested leaves and dip or spray plant with 4-4-50 Bordeaux. Dry quickly and thoroughly. Heavy infestation: An inspector will refuse entry.
Christmas treePhoma chrysanthemiT501-5: Remove infested parts and treat all plants of same species in shipment with 4-4-50 Bordeaux dip or spray.
ChrysanthemumPhoma chrysanthemiT501-4: Remove infested parts and treat all plants of same species in shipment with 4-4-50 Bordeaux dip or spray.
Chrysanthemum rooted and unrooted cuttingsAphidsMB T201-g-1.
External feedersCOM T201-g-2.
Leafminers, aphids, mites, etc. (Chrysanthemum spp. from Dominican Republic and Colombia when infested with Agromyzid leafminers requires no treatment unless destined to Florida.)T201-g-3: Dip in hot water at 110-111 °F for 20 minutes.
Chrysanthemum (not including Pyrethrum)Meloidogyne spp. and Pratylenchus sppT557-1: Dip in hot water at 118 °F for 25 minutes.
Commodities infested withSlugs of the families Agriolimacidae, Arionidae, Limacidae, Milacidae, Philomycidae, Veronicellidae, including the following genera: Agriolimax, Arion, Colosius, Deroceras, Diplosolenodese, Leidyula, Limax, Meghimatium, Milax, Pallifera, Pseudoveronicella, Sarasinula, Semperula, Vaginulus, VeronicellaMB T201-l.
ConvallariaGlobodera rostochiensis and G. pallidaT551-1: Keep the pips frozen until time for treatment. Then thaw enough to separate bundles just before treatment begins. Without preliminary warmup, immerse in hot water at 118 °F for 30 minutes.
CrocusAphelenchoides subtenuis, Ditylenchus destructorT565-2: Hot water at 110 °F for 4 hours immediately after digging.
Cycads (except Dioon edule)External feedersMB T201-h-1.
Deciduous woody plants (dormant)External feedersMB T201-a-1.
Gypsy moth egg massesMB T313-a or MB T313-b.
MealybugsMB T305-c.
Deciduous woody plants (dormant), root cuttings, scion wood cuttings, and nonfoliated citrus whitefly host: Acer, Berberis, Fraxinus, Philadelphus, Rosa, Spiraea, SyringaBorers, Citrus whitefly hostsMB T201-a-2 or MB T201-k-1.
Dioon eduleExternal feedersMB T201-h-2.
Dieffenbachia, Dracaena, Philodendron (plants and cuttings)External feedersMB T201-i-1.
Internal feedersMB T201-i-2.
Evergreens (Azalea, Berberis, Camellia, Cedrus, Cupressus, Ilex, Juniperus, Photinia, Podocarpus, Thuja, and Taxus)External feedersMB T201-b-1.
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Exceptions:
AraucariaExternal feedersMB T201-c-1.
Azalea indicaExternal feedersMB T201-c-2.
CycadsExternal feedersMB T201-l.
HostsDialeurodes citriMB T201-k-1.
DaphneExternal feedersMB T201-c-1.
LavandulaExternal feedersMisc. T201-p-1.
Osmanthus americanusExternal feedersCOM T201-p-2.
Pinus (Canada to certain States)MB T201-j.
PeanutsGypsy moth egg massesMB T313-a.
Foliated host plants of Dialeurodes citri, excluding Osmanthus americanusDialeurodes citriMB T201-k-1.
Fragaria (strawberry)Aphelenchoides fragariaeT569-1: Hot water at 121 °F for 7 minutes.
Pratylenchus spp.T558-1: Dip in hot water at 127 °F for 2 minutes.
Garlic (see § 319.37-6(c))Brachycerus spp. and Dyspessa ululaMB T202-j.
GentianaSeptoria gentianaeT507-2: Remove infested leaves and treat all plants of same species in shipment with Captan following label directions.
GladiolusTaeniothrips simplexMB T202-e-1 or MB 202-e-2.
Ditylenchus destructorT565-3: Hot water at 110 °F for 4 hours immediately after digging.
Greenhouse-grown plants, herbaceous plants and cuttings, greenwood cuttings of woody plantsExternal feeders, leafminers, thripsMB T201-c-1.
Borers and soft scalesMB T201-c-2.
Exceptions:
BromeliadsExternal feedersMB T201-e-3-1.
Cacti and other succulentsExternal feedersMB T201-j.
ChrysanthemumExternal feedersMB T201-g-1.
CycadsExternal feedersMB T201-1.
CyclamenMitesMB T201-a-2.
Dieffenbachia, Dracaena, and PhilodendronExternal feedersMB T201-i-1.
Kalanchoe synsepalaQuarantine pests, excluding scale insectsMisc. T201-p-1.
LavandulaQuarantine pestsCOM T201-p-2.
OrchidsDialeurodes citriMB T201-k-2.
Osmanthus americanusQuarantine pestsMisc. T201-p-1.
PelargoniumQuarantine pestsMisc. T201-p-1.
Sedum adolphiQuarantine pestsMisc. T201-p-1.
Plants infested withSuccinea horticolaT201-o-1: Use a high-pressure water spray on the foliage to flush snails from the plants. The run-off drain must be screened to catch snails before drainage into the sewer system.
Plants infested withVeronicella or other slugsMB T201-1.
Horseradish roots from the countries of Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia, Herzegovina, Croatia, Czech Republic, Estonia, Georgia, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Macedonia, Moldova, Poland, Russia, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, and UzbekistanExternal feedersMB T202-f.
Host plants of Aleurocanthus woglumiAleurocanthus woglumiMB T201-n.
Host plants of Omalonyx unguis and SuccineaOmalonyx unguis and Succinea spp. (snails)T201-o-1: Use a high-pressure water spray on the foliage to flush snails from the plants. The run-off drain must be screened to catch snails before drainage into the sewer system; or T201-o-2: Dip plants with solution prepared by adding 3 level tablespoons of 25 percent Malathion wettable powder and 6 level teaspoons of 50 percent carbaryl wettable powder per gallon of water with a sticker-spreader formulation.
HumulusHeterodera humuliT553-5: Hot water at 118 °F for 30 minutes.
Hyacinthus (bulbs), Iris (bulbs and rhizomes), TigridiaDitylenchus dipsaci and D. destructorT554-1-1: Presoak in water at 70-80 °F for 2.5 hours followed by hot water immersion at 110-111 °F for 1 hour; or T554-1-2: Hot water immersion at 110-111 °F for 3 hours with no presoaking.
Lilium (bulbs)Aphelenchoides fragariaeT566-3: Completely submerge in hot water at 102 °F.
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Lily bulbs packed in subsoilInternal feedersMB T202-g.
LycorisTaeniothrips euchariiMB T202-h.
Muscari, Ornithogalum, Polianthes (tuberose)Ditylenchus dipsaciT567-1: Dip in hot water at 113 °F for 4 hours.
NarcissusSteneotarsonemus laticepsMB T202-i-1; or MB T202-i-2; or T202-i-3: Hot water at 110-111 °F for 1 hour after bulbs reach 110 °F pulp temperature. Apply hot water within 1 month after normal harvest as injury to flower bud may occur.
Ditylenchus dipsaciT555-1: Presoak in water at 70-80 °F for 2 hours; then at 110-111 °F until all bulbs reach that temperature and hold for 4 hours.
Nonfoliated host plants of Dialeurodes citri, excluding Osmanthus americanusDialeurodes citriMB T201-k-2.
OrchidsAscochyta sppT513-1: Defoliate if leaf-borne only; inspector will refuse entry if pseudo-bulbs infested.
Cercospora sppT501-3: Remove infested parts and treat all plants of same species in shipment with 4-4-50 Bordeaux dip or spray.
Hemileia spp., Leptosphaeria spp., Mycosphaerella spp., Ophiodothella orchidearum, Phomopsis orchidophilia, Phyllachora spp., Phyllosticta spp., Sphenospora spp., Sphaerodothis spp., Uredo spp. (except U. scabies)Light infestation: T509-2-1: Remove infested leaves and treat plant with 4-4-50 Bordeaux dip or spray. Dry quickly and thoroughly. Heavy infestation: An inspector will refuse entry.
Orchids, plants and cuttings (see MB T305-c for mealybugs)External feeders (other than soft scales)MB T201-d-1.
Orchids, plants and cuttingsExternal feeders (other than soft scales) infesting greenhouse grown plant materialMB T201-d-2.
Borers, cattleya fly, Mordellistena spp., soft scales, Vinsonia sppMB T201-d-3.
Cecidomyid gallsT201-d-4:Excise all galls.
Leaf miner, Eurytoma spp. infesting RhynchostylisT201-d-5: Hot water dip at 118 °F for 1/2 hour followed by a cool water bath.
Orchids to FloridaRustsT508-1: An inspector will refuse entry of all infested plants and all other plants of the same species or variety in the shipment. Other orchid species in the shipment that may have become contaminated must be treated with Captan. Repackage treated orchids in clean shipping containers.
Oryza (paddy rice)Aphelenchoides fragariaeT559-2: Dip in hot water at 132.8 °F for 15 minutes.
Pineapple slipsVariousMB T201-e-3-1 or MB T201-e-3-2.
Pines (Pinus spp.) from Canada and destined to California, Idaho, Oregon, or Utah. Precautionary treatment for pine trees and twigs and branches of all Pinus spp., except that Christmas trees and other pine decorative materials are exempt from treatment from November 1-December 31Rhyacionia buolianaMB T201-j.
Plant cuttings:
Scion woodExternal feedersMB T201-m-1.
Greenwood cuttings of woody plants and herbaceous plant cuttingsExternal feedersMB T201-m-2.
Root cuttingsExternal feedersMB T201-m- or MB T201-m-4.
Exceptions to plant cuttings:
AvocadoExternal feedersCOM T201-p-1.
ChrysanthemumExternal feedersMB T201-g-1.
DieffenbachiaExternal feedersMB T201-i-1.
DracaenaExternal feedersMB T201-i-2.
LavandulaExternal feedersCOM T201-p-1.
OrchidsExternal feedersMB T201-k-2.
PhilodendronExternal feedersMB T201-i-1.
Plant material not tolerant to fumigationActionable pestsCOM T201-p-1.
RhododendronChrysomyxa spp.T501-6: Remove infested parts and treat all plants of same species in shipment with 4-4-50 Bordeaux dip or spray; or T505-2-1: Treat with mancozeb or other approved fungicide of equal effectiveness according to the label instructions.
Rosa (except multiflora)Meloidogyne spp.T560-1: Dip in hot water at 123 °F for 10 minutes.
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SelaginellaExternal feedersMB T202-a-1 or MB T202-a-2.
Internal feedersMB T202-a-3.
Senecio (Lingularis)Aphelenchoides fragariaeT568-1: Treat with hot water at 110 °F for 1 hour.
ScillaDitylenchus dipsaciT565-4: Hot water at 110 °F for 4 hours immediately after digging.
Solanum (potato tubers)Globodera rostochiensis, G. pallidaT565-5: Hot water at 110 °F for 4 hours immediately after digging.
Various plant commoditiesMeloidogyne spp.T553-1: Hot water at 118 °F for 30 minutes.
Yams and sweet potatoesMB T202-d.

(o) Railroad cars (empty). The treatment schedules for which administration instructions are not provided are in § 305.6 for methyl bromide (MB) fumigation.

PestTreatment schedule
Globodera rostochiensisT406-c, steam cleaning: Steam at high pressure until all soil is removed. Treated surfaces must be thoroughly wet and heated.
Pectinophora gossypiellaMB T401-a.
Trogoderma granariumMB T401-b.
Nematode cystsT401-c, high pressure steam cleaning; or formaldehyde wetting spray (one part 40 percent commercial formalin to 9 parts water).

(p) Rice straw and hulls. The treatment schedules for which administration instructions are not provided are in § 305.25 for dry heat (DH), § 305.6 for methyl bromide (MB) fumigation, and § 305.23 for steam sterilization (SS).

Plant materialPestTreatment schedule
Articles made with rice strawFungal diseases of rice or internal feedersDH T303-d-1 or SS T303-b-1 or SS T303-d-2.
Articles made with rice straw for indoor use onlyInternal feedersMB T303-d-2-2 or MB T303-d-2-3.
Brooms made of rice strawVarious rice-related diseasesDH T518-1.
Closely packed rice straw and hullsVarious rice-related diseasesSS T519-1.
Loose rice straw and hullsVarious rice-related diseasesSS T519-2.
Novelties made of rice strawVarious rice-related-diseasesDH T518-2-1 or SS T518-2-2.
Rice straw and hulls imported for purposes other than approved processingFungal diseases of riceSS T303-b-1 or SS T303-b-2.
Rice straw and hulls imported in small lots of 25 pounds or lessFungal diseases of riceDH T303-c-1.

(q) Seeds. The treatment schedules for which numbers are specified and administration instructions are not provided are in § 305.10 for combination (COM) treatments, § 305.25 for dry heat (DH), § 305.6 for methyl bromide (MB) fumigation, § 305.7 for phosphine (PH), and § 305.24 for vapor heat (VH).

(1) Seeds other than noxious weed seeds.

Type of seedsPestTreatment schedule
Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) from EuropeVerticillium albo-atrumT520-1-1: Dust with 75 percent Thiram at the rate of 166 grams per 50 kilograms of seed (3.3g/kg); or T520-1-2: Treat with a slurry of Thiram 75 WP at a rate of 166 grams per 360 milliliters of water per 50 kilograms of seed (3.3 g pesticide/7.2 ml water/kg seed).
Avocado (no pulp)Conotrachelus spp., Heilipus lauri, Caulophilus latinasus, Copturus aguacatae, Stenoma cateniferMB T203-m.
CasuarinaBootanomyia spp.MB T203-o-l.
Chestnut and acornInternal feedersMB T203-e.
Citrus (Rutaceae family)Citrus cankerCOM T203-p; or for seed from regions where citrus canker occurs, COM T511-1.
Conifer (species with small seeds, such as Picea spp., Pinus sylvestris, and Pinus mugo)External feedersMB T203-i-1.
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Conifer (species with small seeds, such as Picea spp., Pinus sylvestris, and Pinus mugo and nutlike seeds or tightly packed seeds so as to make fumigant penetration questionable)Internal feedersMB T203-i-2.
Corn (small lots for propagation but not for food, feed, or oil purposes)Various corn-related diseasesT510-2: Treat seeds with a dry application of Mancozeb in combination with Captan. Disinfect small bags containing corn (bags weighing 60 pounds or less) only with: (1) Dry heat at 212 °F for 1 hour; or (2) steam at 10 pounds pressure at a minimum of 240 °F for 20 minutes. Note: Bags with plastic liners must be opened prior to treatment.
Cottonseed (bagged, packaged, or bulk)External feedersMB T203-f-1 or MB T203-f-2 or MB T203-f-3 or PH T203-f-4.
Hevea brasiliensisSeed boring insectsMB T203-j.
Pods and seeds of kenaf, hibiscus, and okraInternal feedersMB T203-g-1 or MB T203-g-2 or PH T203-g-3.
Leguminosae=FabaceaeBruchophagus spp. and Eurytoma spp.MB T203-o-3.
Caryedon spp.MB T203-c or MB T203-a-2.
Caryedon spp. (in or with, etc.)MB T203-o-4-1 or MB T203-o-4-2.
Lonicera and other seedsRhagoletis cerasi pupae (Diptera: Tephritidae)MB T203-o-5.
Macadamia nutCryptophlebia illepidaMB T203-k.
RosmarinusJuvenile Helicella spp. (snails) or internal feedersMB T203-h.
UmbelliferaeSystole spp.MB T203-o-2.
Vicia spp., excluding seeds of Vicia fabaBruchidaeMB T203-d-1.
Vicia spp., including seeds of Vicia fabaBruchidaeMB T203-d-2.
SeedsTrogoderma granariumMB T203-l.
Seeds (excluding seeds of Vicia spp.)Bruchidae excluding Caryedon spp. at NAPMB T203-b.
Seeds not specifically listedExternal feedersMB T203-a-1.
Internal feedersMB T203-a-2.
Seeds with infested pulpFruit flies and other pulp infesting insectsT203-n: Place seed in wire basket. Immerse in 118-125 °F water for 25 minutes. Remove pulp from seed under running tap water.

(2) Noxious weed seeds (devitalization treatment).

Weed seedsTreatment schedule
Asphodelus fistulosus, Digitaria spp., Oryza spp., Paspalum scrobiculatum, Prosopis spp., Solanum viarum, Striga spp., Urochloa panicoidesDH T412-a.
Cuscuta spp.DH T412-b-1 or VH T412-b-2.

(r) Ships, containers, and surrounding area. The treatment schedules for which administration instructions are not provided are in § 305.6 for methyl bromide (MB) fumigation.

ProductPestTreatment schedule
Asphalt surfaces and asphalt-base painted surfacesTrogoderma granariumT402-b-3-2: Prepare 3 percent spray by adding 1 pound of 25 percent malathion wettable powder to each gallon of water. Spray at 2 gal/1000 ft 2 or to the point of runoff.
Piers and bargesGlobodera rostochiensisT406-c, steam cleaning: Steam at high pressure until all soil is removed. Treated surfaces must be thoroughly wet and heated.
Metal and wood surfaces such as decks, bulkheads, piers, and other areas not subject to fumigationsTrogoderma granariumT402-b-3-1: Prepare 3 percent spray by mixing 1/2 pint emulsifiable concentrate (57 percent premium grade malathion) per gallon of water. Spray at 2 gal/1000 ft 2 or to the point of runoff.
Ship holds and any nonplant cargo material within holdsQuarantine significant snails of the family Achatinidea, including the following genera: Achatina, Archachatina, Lignus, LimicolariaMB T402-a-1.
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Ship holds and any nonplant cargo material within holdsQuarantine significant snails of the family Hygromiidae, including the following genera: Canidula, Cernuella, Cochlicella, Helicella, Helicopsis, Monacha, Platytheba, Pseudotrichia, Trochoidea, Xerolenta, Xeropicta, Xerosecta, XerotrichaMB T402-a-2.
Ship holds and any nonplant cargo material within holdsQuarantine significant snails of the families Helicidae and Succineidae, including the following genera: Caracollina, Cepaea, Cryptomphalus, Helix, Omalonyx, Otala, Succinea, ThebaMB T402-a-3.
Ship holds and storerooms with loosely packed materialTrogoderma granariumMB T402-b-1.
Ship holds and storerooms with tightly packed materialTrogoderma granariumMB T402-b-2.

(s) Skins (goatskins, lambskins, and sheepskins). The treatment schedules for which administration instructions are not provided are in § 305.6 for methyl bromide (MB) fumigation.

PestTreatment schedule
Trogoderma granariumMB T416-a-1 or MB T416-a-2 or MB T416-a-3.

(t) Soil. The treatment schedules for which numbers are specified and administration instructions are not provided are in § 305.6 for methyl bromide (MB) fumigation, § 305.23 for steam sterilization (SS), and § 305.25 for dry heat (DH).

ProductPestTreatment
Herbarium specimens of mosses and liverworts in soil and originating in golden nematode free countriesPrecautionaryMB T408-e-1.
Herbarium specimens of mosses and liverworts in soil and originating in golden nematode free countriesGlobodera rostochiensisMB T408-e-2.
SoilPotato cyst nematodeMB T502-3.
SoilVarious pests and pathogens found in soil (including Striga)DH T408-a.
Various pests and pathogens found in soilSS T408-b.
Soil (friable and moist, but not wet and not more than 12 inches in depth)Globodera rostochiensisMB T408-c-2.
SoilInsectsT408-d-1: Screening through 16 mesh screens will remove most larvae and pupae, except smaller types; or T408-d-2: Freezing—0 °F for 5 days.
Soil (friable and moist, but not wet and not more than 12 inches in depth) in containers with dimensions that do not exceed 24 inchesGlobodera rostochiensisMB T408-c-1.
Soil on equipmentVarious pests and pathogens found in soilT408-b-1 (steam cleaning): Steam at high pressure until all soil is removed. Treated surfaces must be thoroughly wet and heated.
Soil contaminated equipment (precautionary treatment)Soil fungi, nematodes, and certain soil insectsT408-f, steam cleaning: Steam at high pressure until all soil is removed. Treated surfaces must be thoroughly wet and heated.
Soil contaminated non-food or non-feed commodities (soil must be friable and or moist, but not wet, and must not exceed 12 inches in dimension)StrigaMB T408-g-1 or MB T408-g-2.

(u) Sugarcane. Start Printed Page 33296

ProductPestTreatment schedule
Saccharum (seed pieces)Xanthomonas albilineans and X. vasculorumT514-1: Presoak in water at room temperature for 24 hours. Then immerse in water at 122 °F for 3 hours.
Saccharum (true seed fuzz)T514-2: Immerse in 0.525 percent sodium hypochlorite solution for 30 minutes followed by at least 8 hours air drying before packaging (Dilute 1 part Clorox or similar solution containing 5.25 percent sodium hypochlorite; if using ultra strength chlorine bleach, use only 3/4 as much bleach).
Saccharum (bagasse)T514-3: Dry heat treatment for 2 hours at 158 °F.
Sugarcane (baled)Various sugarcane-related diseasesT515-1: Introduce live steam into 25″ vacuum until pressure reaches 15 to 20 pounds. Hold until center of bale is 220-230 °F and maintain for 30 minutes.
Sugarcane (loose)T515-2-1: Introduce steam into 25″ vacuum (or if with initial vacuum, “bleed” air until steam vapor fills chamber).
T515-2-3: Dry heat at 212 °F for 1 hour.
T515-2-4: Remove the pulp in water at 190-205 °F, followed by drying at 212 °F for 1 hour.
T515-2-5: Flash heated to 1,000 °F (Arnold dryer).

(v) Wood articles including containers, oak logs and lumber, Christmas trees. The treatment schedules for which administration instructions are not provided are in § 305.6 for methyl bromide (MB) fumigation, § 305.8 for sulfuryl fluoride (SF), and § 305.28 for kiln sterilization (KS).

MaterialPestTreatment schedule
Cut conifer Christmas treesLymantria dispar egg massesMB T313-a.
Cut pine Christmas trees and pine logsTomicus piniperdaMB T313-b.
Wood surfaces (can be combined with other surfaces such as metal or concrete)SF T404-c-2.
Wood surfaces (can be combined with other surfaces such as metal or concrete)Borers (wood wasps, cerambycids, and Dinoderus)T404-b-5-1: (1) The spray must be applied by or under the supervision of pest control operators or other trained personnel responsible for insect control programs; (2) prepare the spray by thoroughly mixing 79 ml (22/3 fluid ounces) of Dursban 4E with water for a total of 1 gallon of mixture (equivalent to 2.1 gallons in 100 gallons of water); and (3) apply as a 1 percent chlorpyrifos spray with suitable hand- or power-operated ground spray equipment to the point of runoff.
Oak logsOak wilt diseaseMB T312-a.
Oak lumberOak wilt diseaseMB T312-b.
Wood products including containersBorers (wood wasps, cerambycids, and Dinoderus)MB T404-b-1-1 or MB T404-b-1-2 or SF T404-b-2 or KS T404-b-4.
Globodera rostochiensisMB T404-a.
TermitesMB T404-c-1-1 or MB T404-c-1-2.
Borers and Trogoderma granariumMB T404-d.

Subpart—Chemical Treatments

Treatment requirements.

(a) Certified facility. The fumigation treatment facility must be certified by APHIS. Facilities are required to be inspected and recertified annually, or as often as APHIS directs, depending upon treatments performed, commodities handled, and operations conducted at the facility. In order to be certified, a fumigation facility must:

(1) Be capable of administering the required dosage range for the required duration and at the appropriate temperature.

(2) Be adequate to contain the fumigant and be constructed from material that is not reactive to the fumigant.

(3) For vacuum fumigation facilities, be constructed to withstand required negative pressure.

(b) Monitoring. Treatment must be monitored by an official authorized by APHIS to ensure proper administration of the treatment, including that the correct amount of gas reaches the target organism and that an adequate number and placement of blowers, fans, sampling tubes, or monitoring lines are used in the treatment enclosure. An Start Printed Page 33297official authorized by APHIS approves, adjusts, or rejects the treatment.

(c) Treatment procedures. (1) To kill the pest, all chemical applications must be administered in accordance with an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approved pesticide label and the APHIS-approved treatment schedule prescribed in this part. If EPA cancels approval for the use of a pesticide on a commodity, then the treatment schedule prescribed in this part is no longer authorized for that commodity. If the commodity is not listed on the pesticide label and/or a Federal quarantine or crisis exemption in accordance with FIFRA section 18, then no chemical treatment is available.

(2) Temperature/concentration readings must be taken for items known to be sorptive or whose sorptive properties are unknown when treatment is administered in chambers at normal atmospheric pressure.

(3) The volume of the commodity stacked inside the treatment enclosure must not exceed 2/3 of the volume of the enclosure. Stacking must be approved by an official authorized by APHIS before treatment begins. All commodities undergoing treatment must be listed on the label.

(4) Recording and measuring equipment must be adequate to accurately monitor the gas concentration, to ensure the correct amount of gas reaches the pests, and to detect any leaks in the enclosure. At least three sampling tubes or monitoring lines must be used in the treatment enclosure.

(5) An adequate number of blowers or fans must be used inside of the treatment enclosure to uniformly distribute gas throughout the enclosure. The circulation system must be able to recirculate the entire volume of gas in the enclosure in 3 minutes or less.

(6) The exposure period begins after all gas has been introduced.

(7) For vacuum fumigation: The vacuum pump must be able to reduce pressure in the treatment enclosure to 1-2 inches of mercury in 15 minutes or less.

Methyl bromide fumigation treatment schedules.

(a) Standard schedules.

Treatment schedulePressureTemperature (°F)Dosage rate (lb/1000 cubic feet)Exposure period (hours)
MBOFFNAP170 or above23.5
T101-a-1NAP80 or above1.52
70-7922
60-692.52
50-5932
40-4942
T101-a-215″ vacuum90 or above22
80-892.52
70-7932
60-6932.5
50-5933
40-4933.5
T101-a-3See T101-a-1
T101-b-1See T101-a-1
T101-b-1-1NAP80 or above2.52
70-7932
60-6942
T101-b-2NAP70 or above22
60-692.52
50-5932
45-493.52
40-4442
T101-b-3-1NAP90 or above2.54
80-8934
70-793.54
60-6944
T101-c-1NAP70 or above24
T101-c-226″ vacuum70 or above33.5
60-6934
50-5934.5
40-4935
T101-c-3NAP70 or above23.5
65-6924
T101-c-3-1NAP70 or above32
T101-d-1See T101-a-1
T101-d-2NAP70 or above3.511
60-693.512
50-593.513
40-493.514
T101-d-3NAP70 or above23.5
T101-e-1NAP70 or above32.5
60-6933
50-5933.5
40-4934
T101-e-215″ vacuum90 or above21.5
80-8922
70-792.52
60-6932
Start Printed Page 33298
50-5933
40-4934
T101-e-3See T101-a-1
T101-f-215″ vacuum90 or above23
80-892.53
70-7933
60-6933.5
T101-f-3See T101-b-3-1
T101-g-1See T101-a-2
T101-g-1-1NAP90 or above23
80-892.53
70-7933
60-6933.5
50-5934
T101-g-2NAP90 or above23
80-892.53
70-7933
60-6933.5
T101-h-1See T101-a-1
T101-h-2See T101-a-1
T101-h-2-1NAP70 or above23.5
65-6924
T101-h-3NAP80 or above1.52
70-7922
60-692.52
T101-i-1NAP80 or above1.52
70-7922
T101-i-1-1NAP70 or above23.5
T101-i-2See T101-a-1.
T101-i-2-1See T101-a-1.
T101-j-1See T101-b-2.
T101-j-2NAP80 or above1.52
70-791.52
65-691.752
T101-j-2-1NAP70-852.52
T101-k-1See T101-a-1.
T101-k-215″ vacuum90 or above0.51.5
80-8911.5
70-791.51.5
60-6921.5
50-592.51.5
40-4931.5
T101-k-2-1NAP80 or above1.52
70-7922
60-692.52
50-5932
T101-l-1See 101-g-1-1.
T101-l-215″ vacuum90 or above22
80-892.52
70-7932
T101-m-1See T101-a-2
T101-m-2See T101-a-1
T101-m-2-1NAP70 or above23.5
65-6924
T101-n-1See T101-g-2
T101-n-2See T101-b-2
T101-n-2-1See T101-k-2-1.
T101-n-2-1-1NAP70 or above216
60-69224
50-59316
40-49324
T101-o-1See T101-a-1
T101-o-2See T101-a-1
T101-p-1See T101-a-1
T101-p-2NAP90 or above12
80-891.52
70-7922
60-692.52
50-5932
40-493.52
Start Printed Page 33299
T101-q-2NAP90 or above22
80-892.52
70-7932
60-6932.5
50-5933
40-4933.5
T101-r-1See T101-a-1
T101-r-2NAP70 or above26
T101-s-1NAP70 or above22
60-692.52
50-5932
40-4942
T101-s-2See T101-a-1
T101-t-1NAP90 or above43
80-8944
70-7954
60-6955
50-5965
40-4966
T101-t-2See T101-a-1
T101-u-126″ vacuum80 or above32
70-7942
60-6943
50-5944
40-4945
T101-u-2NAP80 or above2.52
70-7932
T101-v-1See T101-b-2
T101-v-2NAP70 or above2.752
T101-w-115″ vacuum80 or above22
70-7932
60-6942
50-5943
40-4944
T101-w-1-2NAP70 or above22
T101-w-2See T101-h-3.
T101-x-1See T101-h-3.
T101-x-1-1NAP70 or above2.52.5
T101-x-2See T101-a-1
T101-y-1See T101-k-2-1.
T101-y-2See T101-a-1.
T101-z-1NAP90 or above23
80-892.53
70-7933
60-6933.5
50-5934
40-4944
T101-z-2See T101-k-2-1.
T104-a-1See T101-a-1
T104-a-2See T101-b-1-1
T201-a-1/T201-a-2 (except Brachyrhinus larvae)NAP/26″ vacuum90-9622
80-892.52
70-7932
60-6932.5
50-5933
40-4933.5
T201-a-1/T201-a-2 (Brachyrhinus larvae)NAP/26″ vacuum90-9622.5
80-892.52.5
70-7932.5
60-6933
50-5933.5
40-4934
T201-b-1 (except Brachyrhinus larvae)NAP90-961.52
80-8922
70-792.52
60-692.52.5
50-592.53
40-492.53.5
T201-b-1 (Brachyrhinus larvae)NAP90-9622.5
Start Printed Page 33300
80-892.52.5
70-7932.5
60-6933
50-5933.5
40-4934
T201-c-1 2NAP80-901.52
70-7922
60-692.52
50-5932
40-493.52
T201-c-2 315″ vacuum80-902.52
70-7932
60-6932.5
50-5933
40-4933.5
T201-d-1 (except Brachyrhinus larvae)NAP90-9622
80-892.52
70-7932
60-6932.5
50-5933
40-4933.5
T201-d-1 (Brachyrhinus larvae)NAP90-9622.5
80-892.52.5
70-7932.5
60-6933
50-5933.5
40-4934
T201-d-2NAP90-9612
80-891.52
70-7922
60-692.52
50-5932
40-493.52
T201-d-315″ vacuum90-9631
80-8931.5
70-7932
60-6932.5
50-5933
40-4933.5
T201-e-1/T201-e-2NAP/15″ vacuum90-9621.5
80-8922
70-7932
60-6932.5
50-5933
T201-e-3-1NAP90-961.52
80-8922
70-792.52
60-6932
T201-e-3-226″ vacuum90-961.51.5
80-8921.5
70-792.51.5
60-6931.5
T201-f-1/T201-f-2 (except Brachyrhinus larvae)NAP/15″ vacuum90-9622
80-892.52
70-7932
60-6932.5
50-5933
40-4933.5
T201-f-1/T201-f-2 (Brachyrhinus larvae)NAP/15″ vacuum90-9622.5
80-892.52.5
70-7932.5
60-6933
50-5933.5
40-4934
T201-g-1NAP70 or above0.752
T201-h-1/T201-h-215″ vacuum/26″ vacuum90-9622
80-892.52
60-7932
40-5932.5
Start Printed Page 33301
T201-i-1/T201-i-2NAP/26″ vacuum90-9621.5
80-8922
70-7932
60-6932.5
50-5933
T201-jNAP7542
7442 hrs 1 min
7342 hrs 2 min
7242 hrs 4 min
7142 hrs 7 min
7042 hrs 9 min
6942 hrs 11min
6842 hrs 14min
6742 hrs 16 min
6642 hrs 19 min
6542 hrs 22 min
6442 hrs 25 min
6342 hrs 28 min
6242 hrs 31 min
6142 hrs 35 min
6042 hrs 38 min
5942 hrs 41 min
5842 hrs 43 min
5742 hrs 46 min
5642 hrs 49 min
5542 hrs 52 min
5442 hrs 55 min
5342 hrs 58 min
5243 hrs 1 min
5143 hrs 5 min
5043 hrs 8 min
4943 hrs 12 min
4843 hrs 15 min
4743 hrs 19 min
4643 hrs 24 min
4543 hrs 28 min
T201-k-1 (except Brachyrhinus larvae)NAP85-9614
80-8422.5
70-7923.5
T201-k-1 (Brachyrhinus larvae)NAP85-961.54
80-842.52.5
70-7923.5
T201-k-2 (except Brachyrhinus larvae)NAP90-9622
80-892.52
70-7932
60-6932.5
50-5933
40-4933.5
T201-k-2 (Brachyrhinus larvae)NAP90-9622.5
80-892.52.5
70-7932.5
60-6933
50-5933.5
40-4934
T201-lNAP90-9612
80-891.252
70-791.52
60-691.752
T201-m-1 (except Brachyrhinus larvae)NAP90-9622
80-892.52
70-7932
60-6932.5
50-5933
40-4933.5
T201-m-1 (Brachyrhinus larvae)NAP90-9622.5
80-892.52.5
70-7932.5
60-6933
50-5933.5
40-4934
Start Printed Page 33302
T201-m-2NAP80-901.52
70-7922
60-692.52
50-5932
40-493.52
T201-m-3 (except Brachyrhinus larvae)NAP90-9622
80-892.52
70-7932
60-6932.5
50-5933
40-4933.5
T201-m-3 (Brachyrhinus larvae)NAP90-9622.5
80-892.52.5
70-7932.5
60-6933
50-5933.5
40-4934
T201-m-4NAP90-9622.5
80-892.52.5
70-7932.5
60-6933
50-5933.5
40-4934
T201-nNAP85 or above12
80-851.252
70-791.52
65-691.752
T202-a-1 (except Brachyrhinus larvae)NAP90-9622
80-892.52
70-7932
60-6932.5
50-5933
40-4933.5
T202-a-1 (Brachyrhinus larvae)NAP90-9622.5
80-892.52.5
70-7932.5
60-6933
50-5933.5
40-4934
T202-a-2NAP90-9622.5
80-892.52.5
70-7932.5
60-6933
50-5933.5
40-4934
T202-a-3 (except Brachyrhinus larvae)26″ vacuum90-9622
80-892.52
70-7932
60-6932.5
50-5933
40-4933.5
T202-a-3 (Brachyrhinus larvae)26″ vacuum90-9622.5
80-892.52.5
70-7932.5
60-6933
50-5933.5
40-4934
T202-b26″ vacuum70-9642
60-6942.5
50-5943
40-4944
T202-dNAP90-962.54
80-8934
70-793.54
60-6944
T202-e-1NAP90-9623
80-892.53
70-7933
60-6933.5
50-5934
Start Printed Page 33303
40-4934.5
T202-e-226″ vacuum90-9622
80-892.52
70-7932
60-6932.5
50-5933
40-4933.5
T202-f (except Brachyrhinus larvae)15″ vacuum90-9622
80-892.52
70-7932
60-6932.5
50-5933
40-4933.5
T202-f (Brachyrhinus larvae)15″ vacuum90-9622.5
80-892.52.5
70-7932.5
60-6933
50-5933.5
40-4934
T202-gNAP90-9623
80-892.53
70-7933
60-6933.5
50-5934
40-4934.5
T202-h (except Brachyrhinus larvae)26″ vacuum90-9622
80-892.52
70-7932
60-6932.5
50-5933
40-4933.5
T202-h (Brachyrhinus larvae)26″ vacuum90-9622.5
80-892.52.5
70-7932.5
60-6933
50-5933.5
40-4934
T202-i-1NAP90-9632
80-893.52
70-7942
60-6942.5
50-5943
40-4943.5
T202-i-2NAP90-9622
80-892.52
70-7932
60-6932.5
50-5933
40-4933.5
T202-j15″ vacuum90-9621.5
80-8922
70-792.52
60-6932
50-5933
40-4934
T203-a-1NAP80-962.52.5
70-7932.5
60-6933
50-5933.5
40-4934
T203-a-226″ vacuum80-962.52.5
70-7932.5
60-6933
50-5933.5
40-4934
T203-b (except Caryedon spp.)26″ vacuum70-9632.5
60-6933
50-5933.5
40-4934
Start Printed Page 33304
T203-b (Caryedon spp.)26″ vacuum40-9652
T203-cNAP50 or above224
T203-d-1NAP70 or above3.511
60-693.512
50-593.513
40-493.514
T203-d-2 (except Vicia faba)26″ vacuum70-9632.5
60-6933
50-5933.5
40-4934
T203-d-2 (Vicia faba)26” vacuum70-9633.5
60-6934
50-5934.5
40-4935
T203-e26″ vacuum80-9632
70-7942
60-6943
50-5944
40-4945
T203-f-1NAP60 or above612
60 or above324
40-59712
40-59424
T203-f-2NAP60 or above712
60 or above524
40-59812
40-59624
T203-f-3NAP40 or above42
T203-g-1NAP60-96212
60-96124
40-59312
40-59224
T203-g-226″ vacuum40 or above42
40 or above
T203-h26″ vacuum70 or above44
T203-i-1NAP80-962.52.5
70-7932.5
60-6933
50-5933.5
40-4934
T203-i-226″ vacuum80-962.52.5
70-7932.5
60-6933
50-5933.5
40-4934
T203-jNAP80-962.52
70-7932
60-6932.5
T203-kNAP70 or above22
60-692.52
50-5932
40-493.52
T203-lNAP90 or above2.512
80-893.512
T203-m 26″ vacuum90-9622
80-8932
70-7942
60-6943
50-5944
40-4945
T203-o-126″ vacuum70 or above3.56
T203-o-226″ vacuum80-862.53.5
70-7933.5
60-6934
50-5934.5
40-4935
T203-o-326″ vacuum70 or above44
T203-o-4-126″ vacuum50 or above224
T203-o-4-226″ vacuum70 or above3.53
T203-o-5NAP70 or above48
Start Printed Page 33305
T301-a-1-1 (bulk shipments)NAP60 or above612
60 or above424
40-59712
40-59524
T301-a-1-1 (other than bulk shipments)NAP60 or above612
60 or above324
40-59712
40-59424
T301-a-1-226″ vacuum60 or above83
40-5993
T301-a-2NAP40 or above712
40 or above524
T301-a-3NAP40 or above712
40 or above424
T301-a-4NAP40 or above712
40 or above524
T301-a-5-1NAP40 or above324
T301-a-5-226″ vacuum40 or above42
T301-b-1-1NAP60 or above824
40-591124
T301-b-1-226″ vacuum60 or above83
40-5993
T301-b-2NAP90 or above2.512
80-893.512
T301-b-3NAP90 or above424
80-89624
70-79824
T301-cNAP40 or above816
40 or above10.512
T301-d-1-1NAP90 or above2.52
80-8932
70-7942
60-6943
55-5953
50-545.54
40-4968
T302-a-1-1NAP70 or above26
T302-b-1-2See T301-a-1-1 or T301-a-1-2
T302-c-1NAP90 or above2.512
80-893.512
70-794.512
60-69612
50-597.512
40-49912
T302-c-226″ vacuum60 or above83
40-5993
T302-c-326″ vacuum90-962.512
80-893.512
70-794.512
60-69612
50-591012
40-491212
T302-e-1NAP80-962.52.5
70-7932.5
60-6933
50-5933.5
40-4934
T302-e-226″ vacuum80-962.52.5
70-7932.5
60-6933
50-5933.5
40-4934
T302-g-1NAP90-9543
80-8944
70-7954
60-6955
50-5965
40-4966
T302-g-226″ vacuum80-9632
70-7942
Start Printed Page 33306
60-6943
50-5944
40-4945
T303-d-2-226″ vacuum60 or above2.52.5
50-593.52.5
40-4952.5
T303-d-2-3NAP60 or above2.524
50-59324
40-49424
T304-aNAP60 or above2.532
50-593.532
40-494.532
T304-b26″ vacuum60 or above2.52.5
50-593.52.5
40-4952.5
T305-aNAP80-891.52
70-7922
60-692.52
50-5932
40-493.52
T305-b15″ vacuum80-902.52
70-7932
60-6932.5
50-5933
40-4933.5
T305-cNAP80 or above2.52
70-7932
60-6942
T306-a26″ vacuum40 or above816
40 or above10.512
40 or above168
T306-b (bulk shipments)NAP60 or above612
60 or above424
40-59712
40-59524
T306-b (other than bulk shipments)NAP60 or above612
60 or above324
40-59712
40-59424
T306-c-1NAP90 or above424
80-89824
70-79824
60-691224
50-591228
40-491232
T306-c-226″ vacuum60 or above83
40-5993
T306-d-1NAP90 or above424
80-89624
70-79824
60-691224
50-591228
40-491232
T306-d-226″ vacuum60 or above83
40-5993
T309-a (except sawflies)26″ vacuum60 or above2.52.5
50-593.52.5
40-4952.5
T309-a (sawflies)26″ vacuum60 or above2.55
50-593.55
40-4955
T309-b-1NAP60 or above2.516
50-593.516
40-494.516
T309-b-2NAP60 or above324
50-59524
40-49724
T310-aNAP90 or above43
80-8953
70-7964
Start Printed Page 33307
60-6975
50-5987
40-49816
T310-b26″ vacuum80 or above32.5
70-7933.5
60-6944
50-595.55
T312-aNAP40 or above1572
T312-bNAP40 or above1548
T313-aNAP75 or above1.52.5
7-7422.5
60-692.53
60-6932.5
50-5934
50-5942.5
40-493.54.5
40-4952.5
T313-bNAP60 or above34
60 or above43
50-593.54
50-5943.5
40-4944
T401-aNAP40 or above412
40 or above83
T401-bNAP90 or above2.512
80-893.512
70-794.512
60-69612
50-597.512
40-49912
T402-a-1NAP55 or above824
T402-a-2NAP55 or above872
T402-a-3NAP80 or above610
55-79616
40-54824
T402-b-1NAP90 or above2.512
80-893.512
70-794.512
60-69612
50-597.512
40-49912
T402-b-2NAP90-96424
80-89624
70-79824
T403-a-2-1NAP55 or above872
T403-a-2-226″ vacuum70 or above816
T403-a-3NAP90-9612
80-891.252
70-791.52
60-691.752
T403-a-4-1NAP80 or above610
55-79616
40-54824
T403-a-4-226″ vacuum7 or above66
T403-a-5-1NAP80 or above610
40-79616
T403-a-5-226″ vacuum40 or above66
T403-bUse T401-b or 402-b-2.
T403-c26″ vacuum40 or above816
40 or above10.512
40 or above168
T403-e-1-1NAP90 or above2.512
80-893.512
70-794.512
60-69612
50-597.512
40-49912
T403-e-1-2NAP90-96424
80-89624
70-79824
Start Printed Page 33308
60-691224
50-591228
40-491232
T403-e-2NAP40 or above1048
T403-fNAP70 or above33
60-693.53
50-5943
45-494.53
40-4453
T404-a26″ vacuum40 or above816
40 or above10.512
40 or above168
T404-b-1-1NAP70 or above316
40-69516
T404-b-1-226″ vacuum70 or above44
40-6945
T404-c-1-1NAP40 or above324
T404-c-1-226″ vacuum70 or above43
40-6944
T404-dNAP80 or above3.524
70-794.524
60-69624
50-597.524
40-49924
T406-bNAP60 or above1524
T407NAP40 or above412
40 or above83
T408-c-1See T403-c for loose and friable material only
T408-c-2NAP60 or above1524
T408-e-126″ vacuum70 or above23.5
T408-e-226″ vacuum40 or above816
40 or above10.512
40 or above168
T408-g-1Chamber60 or above1024
60 or above2015.5
T408-g-2Tarpaulin60 or above1524
T411NAP90-9622.5
80-892.52.5
70-7932.5
60-6933
50-5933.5
40-4934
T413-aNAP90 or above2.512
80-893.512
70-794.512
60-69612
50-597.512
40-49912
T413-b26″ vacuum60 or above83
40-5993
T414NAP50 or above3.54
50 or above2.58
50 or above216
40-494.54
40-593.258
40-492.2516
T416-a-1NAP90 or above2.512
80-893.512
70-794.512
60-69612
50-597.512
40-49912
T416-a-226″ vacuum60 or above83
40-5993
T416-a-326″ vacuum90-962.512
80-893.512
70-794.512
60-69612
50-591012
Start Printed Page 33309
40-491212
T502-1, T502-2, T502-326″ vacuum40 or above816
T506-1, T506-2-126″ vacuum40 or above816
40 or above10.512
40 or above168
1 Normal atmospheric pressure.
2 See T201-p-3 (§ 305.35(c)) for material not tolerant to fumigation.
3 See footnote 2.

(b) MBSFF, fumigation with methyl bromide for sapote fruit fly. Regulated citrus fruits originating inside an area quarantined for sapote fruit fly that are to be moved outside the quarantined area may be treated with methyl bromide fumigation in APHIS-approved chambers. Exposure period for this treatment is 2 hours. To enhance equal concentrations of methyl bromide throughout the chamber, a fan should be placed near the point of gas introduction, and allowed to run for at least 15 minutes. Fruit pulp temperature must be between 21.1 °C and 29.4 °C (70 °F and 85 °F). This temperature requirement refers to fruit pulp only and not to air temperature within the chamber. Fruit taken from a cooling room may have to be prewarmed before fumigation is attempted. To determine fruit pulp temperature, stab several fruit to the center with a suitable thermometer that reads at least in whole degrees (F or C). The lowest temperature should be used, not the average. The methyl bromide dosage is set at a rate of 2.5 pounds of 100 percent pure, type “Q” (for quarantine use only) methyl bromide per 1,000 cubic feet of chamber space. Dosage is based upon chamber volume, not the volume of the fruit being treated. Fruit should be in cartons approved for fumigation. Cartons must be placed on pallets. There should be an air space of at least 1 foot between adjacent pallet loads; at least 1 foot between chamber walls and the nearest carton of fruit; and at least 2 feet between the height of the stack and the ceiling of the chamber. The compressed liquid methyl bromide inside the cylinder must be put through a volatilizer prior to injection into the chamber. Water temperature in the volatilizer must never fall below 65.6 °C (150 °F) at any time during gas injection. However, if, prior to treatment, representative sampling reveals a level of infestation greater than 0.5 percent for the lot, then the fruit is ineligible for treatment.

Phosphine treatment schedules.
Treatment schedulePressureTemperature (°F)Dosage rateExposure period (hours)
T203-f-4NAP150 or above2.1 grams/cubic meter120
T203-g-3NAP50 or above2.1 grams/cubic meter120
T301-a-6NAP50 or above60 grams/1000 ft3120
T301-d-1-2NAP50 or above36 grams/1000 ft372
T311NAP50 or above60 grams/1000 ft3168
1 Normal atmospheric pressure.
Sulfuryl fluoride treatment schedules.
Treatment schedulePressureTemperature (°F)Dosage rate (lb/1000 cubic feet)Exposure period (hours)
T310-dNAP 170 or above224
50-692.524
40-49324
DT404-b-2NAP70 or above416
60-69424
50-59524
40-496.524
532
T404-c-2NAP70 or above116
60-691.524
50-592.524
1 Normal atmospheric pressure.
Start Printed Page 33310
Aerosol spray for aircraft treatment schedules.

(a) Military aircraft. Aerosol disinfection of U.S. military aircraft must conform to requirements in the latest edition of “Quarantine Regulations of the Armed Forces” (Army Reg. 40-12; SECNAVINST 6210.2A; AFR 161-4).

(b) Aerosol schedules.

Treatment scheduleAerosolRate
T409-bd-phenothrin (10%)8g/1,000 ft 3.
T409-c-1Resmethrin (2%)10g/1,000 ft 3.
T409-c-3Resmethrin (1.2%)16.66/1,000 ft 3.
Treatment schedules for combination treatments.

(a) Fumigation followed by cold treatment. (1) Treatment requirements for chemical treatments in § 305.5 and for cold treatment in § 305.15 must be followed.

(2) Normal atmospheric pressure must be used for the methyl bromide portion of the treatment.

(3) In the following table, CT represents cold treatment, and MB represents methyl bromide fumigation:

Treatment scheduleType of treatmentTemperature (°F)Dosage rate (lb/1000 ft 3)Exposure period
T108-a-1 1MB70 or above22 hours.
CT33-374 days.
38-4711 days.
T108-a-2 2MB70 or above22.5 hours.
CT34-404 days.
41-476 days.
48-5610 days.
T108-a-3 3MB70 or above23 hours.
CT43-473 days.
48-566 days.
T108-bMB50 or above1.52 hours.
40-4922 hours.
CT33 or below21 days.
48-566 days.
MB&CTMedflyMB70 or above22 hours.
CT33-374 days.
38-4711 days.
MB70 or above22.5 hours.
CT34-404 days.
41-476 days.
48-5610 days.
MB70 or above23 hours.
CT43-473 days.
48-566 days.
MB&CTOFF 4MB70 or above22 hours.
CT33-374 days.
38-4711 days.
MB70 or above22.5 hours.
CT34-404 days.
41-476 days.
48-5610 days.
MB70 or above23 hours.
CT43-473 days.
48-566 days.
1 For Hawaiian-grown avocados only, a single transient heat spike of no greater than 39.6 °F (4.2 °C) and no longer than 2 hours, during or after 6 days of cold treatment, does not affect the efficacy of the treatment.
2 See footnote 1.
3 See footnote 1.
4 Following fumigation, the fruit must be aerated 2 hours before refrigeration (but refrigeration must begin no more than 24 hours after fumigation is completed).

(b) Cold treatment followed by fumigation. (1) Treatment requirements for chemical treatments in § 305.5 and for cold treatment in § 305.15 must be followed.

(2) Use normal atmospheric pressure for the methyl bromide portion of the treatment.

(3) In the following table, CT represents cold treatment, and MB represents methyl bromide fumigation: Start Printed Page 33311

Treatment scheduleType of treatmentTemperature (°F)Dosage rate (lb/1000 ft 3)Exposure period
T109-a-1CT34 or below40 days.
MB50 or above32 hours.
T109-a-2CT34 or below40 days.
MB59 or above2 pounds 6 ounces2 hours.
T109-d-1CT33 or below21 days.
MB70 or above22 hours.
60-692.5.
40-593.
CT&MBOFFCT3321 days.
MB40-5932 hours.
60-692.52 hours.
70-7922 hours.

(c) T203-p and T511-1, hot water and chemical dip for citrus (Rutacae) seeds for citrus canker. (1) If any mucilaginous material, such as pulp, is adhering to the seed, the seed must be washed to remove it.

(2) The seed must be immersed in water heated to 125 °F or above for 10 minutes.

(3) Then the seed must be immersed for at least 2 minutes in a solution containing 200 parts per million sodium hypochlorite at a pH of 6.0 to 7.5.

(4) Seed from regions where citrus canker occurs must be drained, dried, and repacked near original moisture content.

(d) T201-g-2 and T201-p-2, hand removal plus malathion-carbaryl chemical dip. (1) Pests must be removed by hand from infested parts.

(2) The solutions must be prepared by adding 3 level tablespoons of 25 percent malathion wettable powder and 3 level tablespoons of 50 percent carbaryl wettable powder to each gallon of water. The addition of a sticker-spreader formulation may be required for hard to wet plants. Fresh chemicals must be used and the dip must be prepared for same day use. (For T201-p-2, when the actionable pests are scale insects or their immature crawlers and the label permits, the solution is prepared as indicated, except the 25 percent malathion wettable powder is increased to 4 level tablespoons.)

(3) The entire plant, including the roots, must be submerged in the chemical dip for 30 seconds.

Miscellaneous chemical treatments.

(a) CC1 for citrus canker. The fruit must be thoroughly wetted for at least 2 minutes with a solution containing 200 parts per million sodium hypochlorite.

(b) CC2 for citrus canker. The fruit must be thoroughly wetted with a solution containing sodium o-phenyl phenate (SOPP) at a concentration of 1.86 to 2.0 percent of the total solution, for 45 seconds if the solution has sufficient soap or detergent to cause a visible foaming action or for 1 minute if the solution does not contain sufficient soap to cause a visible foaming action.

Subpart-Cold Treatments

Treatment requirements.

(a) Approved facilities and carriers. Cold treatment facilities or carriers must be approved by APHIS. Reapproval is required annually, or as often as APHIS directs, depending on treatments performed, commodities handled, and operations conducted at the facility. In order to be approved, facilities and carriers must:

(1) Be capable of keeping treated and untreated fruits, vegetables, or other articles separate so as to prevent reinfestation of articles and spread of pests;

(2) Have equipment that is adequate to effectively perform cold treatment.

(b) Cold treatment enclosures. All enclosures in which cold treatment is performed, including refrigerated containers, must:

(1) Be capable of precooling, cooling, and holding fruit at temperatures less than or equal to 2.2 °C (36 °F).

(2) Maintain pulp temperatures according to treatment schedules with no more than a 0.3 °C (0.54 °F) variation in temperature.

(3) Be structurally sound and adequate to maintain required temperatures.

(c) Monitoring. Treatment must be monitored by an official authorized by APHIS to ensure proper administration of the treatment. An official authorized by APHIS must approve the recording devices and sensors used to monitor temperatures and conduct an operational check of the equipment before each use and ensure sensors are calibrated. An official authorized by APHIS approves, adjusts, or rejects the treatment.

(d) Compliance agreements. Facilities located in the United States must operate under a compliance agreement with APHIS. The compliance agreement must be signed by a representative of the cold treatment facility and APHIS. The compliance agreement must contain requirements for equipment, temperature, circulation, and other operational requirements for performing cold treatment to ensure that treatments are administered properly. Compliance agreements must allow officials of APHIS to inspect the facility to monitor compliance with the regulations.

(e) Work plans. Facilities located outside the United States must operate in accordance with a work plan. The work plan must be signed by a representative of the cold treatment facility, the national plant protection organization of the country of origin (NPPO), and APHIS. The work plan must contain requirements for equipment, temperature, circulation, and other operational requirements for performing cold treatment to ensure that cold treatments are administered properly. Work plans for facilities outside the United States may include trust fund agreement information regarding payment of the salaries and expenses of APHIS employees on site. Work plans must allow officials of the NPPO and APHIS to inspect the facility to monitor compliance with APHIS regulations.

(f) Treatment procedures. (1) All material, labor, and equipment for cold treatment performed on vessels must be provided by the vessel or vessel agent. An official authorized by APHIS monitors, manages, and advises in order to ensure that the treatment procedures are followed.

(2) Fruit that may be cold treated must be safeguarded to prevent cross-contamination or mixing with other infested fruit. Before loading in cold treatment containers, packages of fruit must be precooled to a treatment temperature or to a uniform temperature Start Printed Page 33312not to exceed 4.5 °C (40 °F) or precooled at the terminal to 2.2 °F (36 °F).

(3) Breaks, damage, etc., in the treatment enclosure that preclude maintaining correct temperatures must be repaired before use. An official authorized by APHIS must approve loading of compartment, number and placement of sensors, and initial fruit temperature readings before beginning the treatment.

(4) At least three temperature sensors must be used in the treatment compartment during treatment.

(5) The time required to complete the treatment begins when the temperature reaches the required temperature.

(6) Only the same type of fruit in the same type of package may be treated together in a container; no mixture of fruits in containers will be treated.

(7) Fruit must be stacked to allow cold air to be distributed throughout the enclosure, with no pockets of warmer air, and to allow random sampling of pulp temperature in any location in load. Temperatures must be recorded at intervals no longer than 1 hour apart. Gaps of longer than 1 hour may invalidate the treatment or indicate treatment failure.

(8) Cold treatment is not completed until so designated by an official authorized by APHIS or the certifying official of the foreign country; shipments of treated commodities may not be discharged until full APHIS clearance has been completed, including review and approval of treatment record charts.

(9) Pretreatment conditioning (heat shock or 100.4 °F for 10 to 12 hours) of fruits is optional and is the responsibility of the shipper.

(10) Cold treatment of fruits in break-bulk vessels or containers must be initiated by an official authorized by APHIS if there is not a treatment technician who has been trained to initiate cold treatments for either break-bulk vessels or containers.

Cold treatment schedules.
Treatment scheduleTemperature (°F)Exposure period
T107-a134 or below14 days.
35 or below16 days.
36 or below18 days.
T107-a-134 or below15 days.
35 or below17 days.
T107-b33 or below18 days.
34 or below20 days.
35 or below22 days.
T107-c32 or below11 days.
33 or below13 days.
34 or below15 days.
35 or below17 days.
T107-d32 or below13 days.
33 or below14 days.
34 or below18 days.
35 or below20 days.
36 or below22 days.
T107-e31 or below 222 days.
T107-f32 or below10 days.
33 or below11 days.
34 or below12 days.
35 or below14 days.
T107-g0 or below7 days.
T107-h33.4 or below13 days.
33.8 or below15 days.
34.5 or below18 days.
T107-j33.8 or below13 days.
34.5 or below18 days.
CTMedfly34 or below14 days.
35 or below16 days.
36 or below18 days.
T403-a-2-3 (for temperatures below 55 °F)048 hours.
T403-a-4-3, T403-a-5-3, T403-a-6-1048 hours.
T403-a-6-2032 hours.
1048 hours.
T403-a-6-308 hours.
1016 hours.
2024 hours.
1 For Hawaiian-grown avocados only, a single transient heat spike of no greater than 39.6 °F (4.2 °C) and no longer than 2 hours, during or after 6 days of cold treatment, does not affect the efficacy of the treatment.
2 Commence when sensors are at 31 °F or below. If the temperature exceeds 31.5 °F, extend the treatment one-third of a day for each day, or part of a day, that the temperature is above 31.5 °F. If the exposure period is extended, the temperature during the extension period must be 34 °F or below. If the temperature exceeds 34 °F at any time, the treatment is nullified. Also, some freeze damage may occur if the pulp temperature drops below approximately 29.5 °F. This varies with the commodity.
Start Printed Page 33313

Subpart—Quick Freeze Treatments

Authorized treatments; exceptions.

(a) Quick freeze is an authorized treatment for all fruits and vegetables imported into the United States or moved interstate from Hawaii or Puerto Rico, except for those fruits and vegetables listed in paragraph (b) of this section. Quick freeze for fruits and vegetables imported into the United States or moved interstate from Hawaii or Puerto Rico must be conducted in accordance with §§ 318.13-4a, 318.58-4a, and 319.56-2c, respectively.

(b) Quick freeze is not an authorized treatment for:

(1) Avocados with seeds from South America, Central America, or Mexico.

(2) Citrus with peel from Afghanistan, Andaman Islands, Argentina, Bangladesh, Brazil, Cambodia, China (People's Republic of), Comoros, Cote d'Ivoire, Fiji Islands, Home Island in Cocos (Keeling) Islands, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan and adjacent islands, Korea, Laos, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Mauritius, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Philippines, Reunion Islands, Rodrigues Islands, Ryukyu Islands, Saudi Arabia, Seychelles, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand, Thursday Island, United Arab Emirates, Uruguay, Vietnam, Yemen, and Zaire.

(3) Mangoes with seeds from Barbados, Dominica, French Guiana, Guadeloupe, Martinique, St. Lucia, and all countries outside of North, Central, and South America and their adjacent islands (which include the Caribbean Islands and Bermuda).

(4) Corn-on-the-cob from Albania, Algeria, Bosnia and Hercegovina, Croatia, Cyprus, Egypt, France, Greece, Israel, Italy, Lebanon, Libya, Malta, Macedonia, Morocco, Sardinia, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovenia, Spain, Syria, Tunisia, and Turkey.

(5) Black currants unless authorized in an import permit to specified areas.

(c) Quick freeze may damage commodities and is recommended for thick-skinned fruits and vegetables, such as durian and coconut, that will be processed into another form (e.g., for puree, juice, or mashed vegetables).

Quick freeze treatment schedule.

(a) T110.

(1) Initially, lower the commodity's temperature to 0 °F or below.

(2) Hold the temperature of the commodity at 20 °F or below for at least 48 hours.

(3) The commodity may be transported during the 48-hour treatment period, but the temperature must be maintained at 20 °F or below prior to release.

(4) The fruits and vegetables may not be removed from the vessel or vehicle transporting them until an inspector has determined that they are in a satisfactory frozen state upon arrival. If the temperature of the fruits or vegetables in any part of a shipment is found to be above 20 °F at the time of inspection upon arrival, the entire shipment must remain on board the vessel or vehicle under such safeguards as may be prescribed by the inspector until the temperature of the shipment is below 20 °F, or the shipment is transported outside the United States or its territorial waters, or is otherwise disposed of to the satisfaction of the inspector.

(b) [Reserved]

[Reserved]

Subpart—Heat Treatments

Treatment requirements.

(a) Certified facility. The treatment facility must be certified by APHIS. Recertification is required annually, or as often as APHIS directs, depending upon treatments performed, commodities handled, and operations conducted at the facility. In order to be certified, a heat treatment facility must:

(1) Have equipment that is capable of adequately circulating air or water (as relevant to the treatment), changing the temperature, and maintaining the changed temperature sufficient to meet the treatment schedule parameters.

(2) Have equipment used to record, monitor, or sense temperature, maintained in proper working order.

(3) Keep treated and untreated fruits, vegetables, or articles separate so as to prevent reinfestation and spread of pests.

(b) Monitoring. Treatment must be monitored by an official authorized by APHIS to ensure proper administration of the treatment. An official authorized by APHIS approves, adjusts, or rejects the treatment.

(c) Compliance agreements. Facilities located in the United States must operate under a compliance agreement with APHIS. The compliance agreement must be signed by a representative of the heat treatment facilities located in the United States and APHIS. The compliance agreement must contain requirements for equipment, temperature, water quality, circulation, and other measures for performing heat treatments to ensure that treatments are administered properly. Compliance agreements must allow officials of APHIS to inspect the facility to monitor compliance with the regulations.

(d) Work plans. Facilities located outside the United States must operate in accordance with a work plan. The work plan must be signed by a representative of the heat treatment facilities located outside the United States the national plant protection organization of the country of origin (NPPO), and APHIS. The work plan must contain requirements for equipment, temperature, water quality, circulation, and other measures to ensure that heat treatments are administered properly. Work plans for facilities outside the United States must include trust fund agreement information regarding payment of the salaries and expenses of APHIS employees on site. Work plans must allow officials of the NPPO and APHIS to inspect the facility to monitor compliance with APHIS regulations.

(e) Treatment procedures. (1) Before each treatment can begin, an official authorized by APHIS must approve the loading of the commodity in the treatment container.

(2) Sensor equipment must be adequate to monitor the treatment, its type and placement must be approved by an official authorized by APHIS, and the equipment must be tested by an official authorized by APHIS prior to beginning the treatment. Sensor equipment must be locked before each treatment to prevent tampering.

(3) Fruits, vegetables, or articles of substantially different sizes must be treated separately; oversized fruit may be rejected by an official authorized by APHIS.

(4) The treatment period begins when the temperature specified by the treatment schedule has been reached. An official authorized by APHIS may abort the treatment if the facility requires an unreasonably long time to achieve the required temperature.

Hot water dip treatment schedule for mangoes.

Mangoes may be treated using schedule T102-a:

(a) Fruit must be presorted by weight class. Treatment of mixed loads is not allowed.

(b) The mangoes must be treated in the country of origin at a certified facility under the monitoring of an official authorized by APHIS. Prior to each use, an official authorized by APHIS must test and determine that the treatment tank, temperature recording device, and other monitoring equipment of the tank are adequate to conduct the treatment. Start Printed Page 33314

(c) Water in the treatment tank must be treated or changed regularly to prevent microbial contamination. Chlorinated water must be used.

(d) Pulp temperature must be 70 °F or above before starting the treatment.

(e) Fruit must be submerged at least 4 inches below the water's surface.

(f) Water must circulate constantly and be kept at 115 °F or above throughout the treatment with the following tolerances:

(1) During the first 5 minutes of a treatment, temperatures below 113.7 °F are allowed if the temperature is at least 115 °F at the end of the 5-minute period.

(2) For treatments lasting 65-75 minutes, temperatures may fall no lower than 113.7 °F for no more than 10 minutes under emergency conditions.

(3) For treatments lasting 90-110 minutes, temperatures may fall no lower than 113.7 °F for no more than 15 minutes under emergency conditions.

(g) Dip time is as follows:

(1)

OriginShape of mango 1Weight (grams)Dip time 2 (minutes)
Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands, or West Indies (excluding Aruba, Bonaire, Curacao, Margarita, Tortuga, or Trinidad and Tobago)Flat, elongated varietiesUp to 400 400-57065 75
Rounded varietiesUp to 50075
500-70090
701-900110
Central America (north of and including Costa Rica) or MexicoFlat, elongated varietiesUp to 37565
375-57075
Rounded varietiesUp to 50075
500-70090
701-900110
Panama, South America, or West Indies islands of Aruba, Bonaire, Curacao, Margarita, Tortuga, or Trinidad and TobagoFlat, elongated varietiesUp to 375 375-57065 75
Rounded varietiesUp to 42575
425-65090
1 Flat, elongated varieties include Frances, Carrot, Zill, Ataulfo, Carabao, Irwin, and Manila, and rounded varieties include Tommy Atkins, Kent, Hayden, and Keitt.
2 See paragraph (g)(2) of this section for required dip times if the fruit is hydrocooled within 30 minutes of removal from the hot water immersion tank.

(2) Dip times in paragraph (g)(1) of this section are valid if the fruit is not hydrocooled within 30 minutes of removal from the hot water immersion tank. If hydrocooling starts immediately after the hot water immersion treatment, then the original dip time must be extended for an additional 10 minutes. Hydrocooling is optional but may be done only at temperatures of 70 °F or above.

Hot water immersion treatment schedules.

(a) T102-d. (1) Fruit must be grown and treated in Hawaii.

(2) Fruit must be submerged at least 4 inches below the water's surface in a hot water immersion treatment tank certified by APHIS.

(3) The fruit must be submerged for 20 minutes after the water temperature reaches at least 120.2 °F in all locations of the tank. The water must circulate continually and be kept at 120.2 °F or above for the duration of the treatment. Temperatures exceeding 121.1 °F can cause phytotoxic damage.

(4) Hydrocooling for 20 minutes at 75.2 °F is recommended to prevent injury to the fruit from the hot water immersion treatment.

(b) T102-d-1. (1) Fruit must be at ambient temperature before treatment begins.

(2) Fruit must be submerged at least 4 inches below the water's surface in a hot water immersion treatment tank certified by APHIS.

(3) The fruit must be submerged for 20 minutes after the water temperature reaches at least 120.2 °F in all locations of the tank. The water must circulate continually and be kept at 120.2 °F or above for the duration of the treatment. Temperatures exceeding 121.1 °F can cause phytotoxic damage.

(4) Hydrocooling for 20 minutes at 75.2 °F is recommended to prevent injury to the fruit from the hot water immersion treatment.

(c) T102-e. (1) Fruit must be submerged at least 4 inches below the water's surface in a hot water immersion treatment tank certified by APHIS.

(2) Water must circulate continually and be kept at 120.2 °F or above for 20 minutes. Treatment time begins when the water temperature reaches at least 120.2 °F in all locations of the tank. Temperatures exceeding 125.6 °F or treatment times significantly exceeding 20 minutes can cause phytotoxic damage.

(3) Cooling and waxing the fruit are both optional and are the sole responsibility of the processor.

Steam sterilization treatment schedules.
Treatment scheduleTemperature (°F)PressureExposure period (minutes)Directions
T303-b-110 lbs20Use 28″ vacuum. Steam sterilization is not practical for treatment of bales with a density of greater than 30 pounds per cubic foot.
T303-b-210 lbs20Use 28″ vacuum. If without initial vacuum, bleed air until steam vapor escapes. Steam sterilization is not practical for treatment of bales with a density of greater than 30 pounds per cubic foot.
T303-d-226020 lbs15
25015 lbs20
T309-c24010 psi20Use 25&Prime vacuum.
Start Printed Page 33315
T406-d140NAP 160Steam at NAP, tarpaulin or tent. For treatment enclosures of 4,000 ft 3 or less, the minimum air temperature must be 40 °F. For treatment enclosures greater than 4,000 ft 3 and less than or equal to 6,000 ft 3, the minimum air temperature must be 60 °F. Treatment is not recommended for treatment enclosures greater than 6,000 ft 3.
T408-b25015 psi30Preheat laboratory autoclaves. Restrict soil depth to 2 inches when treating quantities of soil in trays. Restrict each package weight to 5 pounds or less when treating individual packages. Load with adequate spacing. Large commercial steam facilities that operate at pressures up to 60 pounds psi will permit treatment of greater soil depth.
T503-1-3 or T503-2-3 (nonbaled)240NAP10
T503-1-3 or T503-2-3 (baled)24010 lbs20
T504-1-2, T504-2-224210 lbs20
T506-2-3 Loose masses of material20 lbs 15 lbs 10 lbs10 15 20Introduce live steam into a closed chamber containing the material to be treated until the required temperature and pressure are indicated. The temperature/pressure relationship must be maintained at or above this point for the required exposure period. No initial vacuum is needed, but air must be released until steam escapes.
T506-2-3 Closely packed material (such as soil)Exhaust the air in the chamber to a high vacuum, and then introduce live steam until the required positive pressure is reached.
T510-1212Live steam from jet of nozzle into loose masses of material until all parts reach 212 °F.
T518-2-226020 lbs15
25015 lbs20
T519-110 lbs20Introduce steam into 28″ vacuum.
T519-2259 24020 lbs 10 lbs10 20Introduce steam into 28″ vacuum (or if without initial vacuum, “bleed” air until steam vapor escapes).
1 Normal atmospheric pressure.
Vapor heat treatment schedules.

(a) T106-a-1, T106-a-2, T106-a-3, T106-a-4. (1) The temperature of the fruit pulp must be increased gradually to 110 °F until the center of the fruit reaches that temperature in 8 hours.

(2) The fruit temperature must be held at 110 °F for 6 hours.

(b) T106-a-1-1. (1) The temperature of the fruit pulp must be increased to 110 °F until the center of fruit reaches that temperature in 6 hours. During the first 2 hours, the temperature must be increased rapidly. The increase over the next 4 hours must be gradual.

(2) The fruit temperature must be held at 110 °F for 4 hours.

(c) T106-b-1, T106-b-2, T106-b-3, T106-b-4, T106-b-5, T106-b-6, T106-b-7, T106-b-8. The temperature of the article must be increased using saturated water vapor at 112 °F until the approximate center of the fruit reaches 112 °F. The fruit temperature must be held at 112 °F for 8.75 hours; then immediately cooled.

(d) T106-c (Quick run-up). (1) The temperature of the article must be increased until the approximate center of fruit reaches 117 °F in a time period of at least 4 hours.

(2) During the last hour of treatment, the relative humidity in the chamber must be maintained at 90 percent or greater.

(e) T106-d. (1) The fruit must be sized before treatment. Temperature probes must be placed in the center of the largest fruits. The temperature of the fruit must be increased using saturated water vapor at 117.5 °F until the pulp temperature near the seed reaches 115.7 °F. The pulp temperature must be held at 115.7 °F or above for 30 minutes; then immediately cooled.

(f) T106-d-1. (1) The fruit must be sized before the treatment. Temperature probes must be placed in the center of the largest fruits.

(2) The temperature of the fruit must be increased using saturated water vapor at 117.5 °F until the center of the fruit reaches 114.8 °F in a minimum of 4 hours.

(3) The fruit temperature must be maintained at 114.8 °F for 10 minutes.

(g) T106-e. (1) Raise temperature of the fruit using saturated water vapor at 116.6 °F until the approximate center of the fruit reaches 114.8 °F within a minimum time period of 4 hours.

(2) Hold fruit temperature at 114.8 °F or above for 20 minutes. If post-treatment cooling is conducted, wait 30 minutes after the treatment to start the forced cooling process.

(h) T106-f. (1) The temperature probes must be placed in the approximate center of the largest fruits at the seed's surface.

(2) The temperature of the fruit must be increased to 117 °F. The total runup time for all sensors must take at least 60 minutes.

(3) The fruit temperature must be held at 117 °F or above for 20 minutes. During the treatment, the relative humidity must be maintained at 90 percent or greater.

(4) The fruit must be hydrocooled under a cool water spray until the fruit sensors reach ambient temperature.

(5) Inspectors will examine the fruit for live quarantine pests. If pests are found, the inspector will reject the treatment.

(i) T106-g. (1) The internal temperature of the fruit must be increased using saturated water vapor until the approximate center of fruit reaches 117 °F in a minimum time of 1 hour or longer.

(2) The fruit temperature must be held at 117 °F or above for 20 minutes. During the treatment, the relative humidity must be maintained at 90 percent or greater.

(j) T412-b-2. The commodity must be heated to 212 °F for 15 minutes.

Dry heat treatment schedules. Start Printed Page 33316
Treatment scheduleTemperature (°F)TimeDirections
T302-a-1-2168 minimumAt least 2 hoursSpread the ears of corn in single layers on slats or wire shelves.
T303-c-12121 hour.
T303-d-1180-2002 hours.
T408-a230-249 250-309 310-397 380-429 430-45016 hours 2 hours. 30 minutes. 4 minutes. 2 minutes.Spread soil in layers 0.5 inches in depth to ensure uniform heat penetration.
T412-a24815 minutesStart timing when the entire mass reaches 248 °F.1
T412-b-121215 minutes.
T503-1-4, T503-2-4, T504-1-1, T504-2-12121 hourTreat small bales only.
T518-11704.5 hoursMay take 2 hours to reach temperature.
T518-2-1180-2002 hours.
1 A minimum of two temperature probes must be placed in the heat treating equipment in order to determine that all niger seed being treated reaches the target temperature. The treatment temperature must be recorded accurately, precisely, and regularly during treatment. The monitoring equipment must be locked before each treatment begins to prevent tampering. Seed processing equipment must have the capability to divert for retreatment any nontreated seeds or treated seeds that do not meet treatment standards.
Khapra beetle treatment schedule for feeds and milled products.

Feeds and milled products may be treated for khapra beetle using schedule T307-a. The temperature must be 180 °F in any part of the products, or the temperature must be at 150 °F for a total of 7 minutes. All parts of the commodity being moved through or manipulated in the heated area must meet the time and temperature requirements. This treatment must be specifically authorized in each case by the Director of Plant Health Programs, PPQ, APHIS.

Forced hot air treatment schedules.

(a) T103-a-1. (1) The temperature probes must be placed into the center of the largest fruit in the load. The number and placement of temperature probes must be approved by APHIS' Center for Plant Health Science and Technology (CPHST) before APHIS can authorize treatment. CPHST grants approval of treatment equipment and facilities through a chamber certification procedure.

(2) APHIS may reject the treatment if the size of an individual fruit exceeds the maximum size authorized by APHIS.

(3) Fruit can be sized before or after the heat treatment. The largest fruit in a load can be identified by either sizing all fruit prior to heating and selecting the largest size class in the load or acquiring fruit of the largest permitted maximum commercial size class.

(4) The fruit containing the temperature probes must be placed inside the hot air chamber at chamber locations specified by APHIS during the chamber certification.

(5) Fruit temperature must be increased within specifications:

(i) The fruit center temperature must be increased to 111.2 °F within 90 minutes or more (minimum approach time is 90 minutes) for all temperature probes.

(ii) The fruit center temperature must be kept at 111.2 °F or hotter for 100 minutes.

(iii) The temperature of the fruit center must be recorded every 2 minutes for the duration of the treatment.

(iv) The total treatment time will vary with the time required to reach 111.2 °F.

(v) Fruit must be cooled after the treatment is completed.

(b) T103-b-1, T103-d-1, and T103-d-2. Temperature sensors must be inserted into the centers of the largest fruits. The number of sensors must be approved in advance by APHIS. Sensors must be physically placed in various parts of the load so that high, middle, and low areas are all represented.

(2) Fruit (placed in open trays, bulk bins, or ventilated boxes) must be loaded into the treatment chamber, and sensors must be attached to the recorder monitor.

(3) The monitor must be set to record temperatures from all sensors at least once every 5 minutes.

(4) The fruit in the chamber must be heated using forced hot air, until the fruit center temperature (all sensors) reaches at least 117 °F. Treatment time may vary, but in every case, it must be at least 4 hours in duration, which includes the lead-up time. The total time required for the fruit to reach 117 °F is counted as part of the 4-hour minimum treatment time.

(5) The temperature of the forced air used to heat the fruit in the chamber may be constant or increased in a series of two or more steps or ramped over the treatment duration.

(6) The fruit may be cooled by forced air or hydrocooling. Cooling can be initiated immediately after all sensors reach at least 117 °F.

(c) T103-c-1. (1) Size and weight of fruit: Standard fruit size 8-14; must not exceed 11/2 pounds.

(2) At least three of the largest mangoes must be probed at the seed's surface. Sensors must be inserted into the thickest portion of the fruit's pulp.

(3) The temperature must be recorded at least once every 2 minutes until the treatment is concluded.

(4) Air heated to 122 °F must be introduced in the chamber.

(5) The treatment must be concluded once the temperature at the seed's surface reaches 118 °F.

(d) T103-e. (1) The temperature of the fruit must be raised using forced hot air until the fruit center temperature (all sensors) reaches at least 117 °F in a minimum time of 1 hour. Heat the fruit in the chamber.

(2) The fruit temperature must be held at 117 °F or above for 20 minutes. During the treatment, the relative humidity must be maintained at 90 percent or greater.

Kiln sterilization treatment schedule.

T404-b-4

Dry bulb temperature (°F)Wet bulb depression (°F)Percent relative humidityPercent moisture contentThickness of lumber (inches)Exposure (hours)
14078213.813
25
37
13016609.4110
212
314
12515619.7146
248
350

Subpart—Irradiation Treatments

Irradiation treatment of imported fruits and vegetables for certain fruit flies and mango seed weevils.

(a) Approved doses. Irradiation at the following doses for the specified fruit flies and seed weevils, carried out in accordance with the provisions of this section, is approved as a treatment for all fruits and vegetables:

Irradiation for Fruit Flies and Seed Weevils in Imported Fruits and Vegetables

Scientific nameCommon nameDose (Gray)
(1) Bactrocera dorsalisOriental fruit fly250
(2) Ceratitis capitataMediterranean fruit fly225
(3) Bactrocera cucurbitaeMelon fly210
(4) Anastrepha fraterculusSouth American fruit fly150
(5) Anastrepha suspensaCaribbean fruit fly150
(6) Anastrepha ludensMexican fruit fly150
(7) Anastrepha obliquaWest Indian fruit fly150
(8) Anastrepha serpentinaSapote fruit fly150
(9) Bactrocera tryoniQueensland fruit fly150
(10) Bactrocera jarvisi(No common name)150
(11) Bactrocera latifronsMalaysian fruit fly150
(12) Sternochetus mangiferae (Fabricus)Mango seed weevil300

(b) Location of facilities. Where certified irradiation facilities are available, an approved irradiation treatment may be conducted for any fruit or vegetable either prior to shipment to the United States or in the United States. Irradiation facilities certified under this section may be located in any State on the mainland United States except Alabama, Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia,[1] Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi,1 Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina,1 South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia. Prior to treatment, the fruits and vegetables to be irradiated may not move into or through any of the States listed in this paragraph, except that movement is allowed through Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas, as an authorized stop for air cargo, or as a transloading location for shipments that arrive by air but that are subsequently transloaded into trucks for overland movement from Dallas/Fort Worth into an authorized State by the shortest route.

(c) Compliance agreement with importers and facility operators for irradiation in the United States. If irradiation is conducted in the United States, both the importer and the operator of the irradiation facility must sign compliance agreements with the Administrator. In the facility compliance agreement, the facility operator must agree to comply with any additional requirements found necessary by the Administrator to prevent the escape, prior to irradiation, of any fruit flies that may be associated with the articles to be irradiated. In the importer compliance agreement, the importer must agree to comply with any additional requirements found necessary by the Administrator to ensure the shipment is not diverted to a destination other than an approved treatment facility and to prevent escape of plant pests from the articles to be irradiated during their transit from the port of first arrival to the irradiation facility in the United States.

(d) Compliance agreement with irradiation facilities outside the United States. If irradiation is conducted outside the United States, the operator of the irradiation facility must sign a compliance agreement with the Administrator and the plant protection service of the country in which the facility is located. In this agreement, the facility operator must agree to comply with the requirements of this section, and the plant protection service of the country in which the facility is located must agree to monitor that compliance and to inform the Administrator of any noncompliance.

(e) Certified facility. The irradiation treatment facility must be certified by the Administrator. Recertification is required in the event of an increase or decrease in the amount of radioisotope, a major modification to equipment that affects the delivered dose, or a change in the owner or managing entity of the facility. Recertification also may be required in cases where a significant variance in dose delivery has been measured by the dosimetry system. In order to be certified, a facility must:

(1) Be capable of administering the minimum absorbed ionizing radiation doses specified in paragraph (a) of this section to the fruits and vegetables; [2]

(2) Be constructed so as to provide physically separate locations for treated and untreated fruits and vegetables, except that fruits and vegetables traveling by conveyor directly into the irradiation chamber may pass through an area that would otherwise be separated. The locations must be separated by a permanent physical barrier such as a wall or chain link fence 6 or more feet high to prevent transfer of cartons, or some other means approved during certification to prevent reinfestation of articles and spread of pests; Start Printed Page 33318

(3) If the facility is located in the United States, the facility will only be certified if the Administrator determines that regulated articles will be safely transported to the facility from the port of arrival without significant risk that plant pests will escape in transit or while the regulated articles are at the facility.

(f) Monitoring and interagency agreements. Treatment must be monitored by an inspector. This monitoring will include inspection of treatment records and unannounced inspections of the facility by an inspector, and may include inspection of articles prior to or after irradiation. Facilities that carry out irradiation operations must notify the Director of Preclearance, PPQ, APHIS, 4700 River Road Unit 140, Riverdale, MD 20737-1236, of scheduled operations at least 30 days before operations commence, except where otherwise provided in the facility preclearance work plan. To ensure the appropriate level of monitoring, before articles may be imported in accordance with this section, the following agreements must be signed:

(1) Irradiation treatment framework equivalency work plan. The plant protection service of a country from which articles are to be imported into the United States in accordance with this section must sign a framework equivalency work plan with APHIS. In this plan, both the foreign plant protection service and APHIS will specify the following items for their respective countries:

(i) Citations for any requirements that apply to the importation of irradiated fruits and vegetables;

(ii) The type and amount of inspection, monitoring, or other activities that will be required in connection with allowing the importation of irradiated fruits and vegetables into that country; and

(iii) Any other conditions that must be met to allow the importation of irradiated fruits and vegetables into that country.

(2) Facility preclearance work plan. Prior to commencing importation into the United States of articles treated at a foreign irradiation facility, APHIS and the plant protection service of the country from which articles are to be imported must jointly develop a preclearance work-plan that details the activities that APHIS and the foreign plant protection service will carry out in connection with each irradiation facility to verify the facility's compliance with the requirements of this section. Typical activities to be described in this work plan may include frequency of visits to the facility by APHIS and foreign plant protection inspectors, methods for reviewing facility records, and methods for verifying that facilities are in compliance with the requirements for separation of articles, packaging, labeling, and other requirements of this section. This facility preclearance work plan will be reviewed and renewed by APHIS and the foreign plant protection service on an annual basis.

(3) Trust fund agreement. Irradiated articles may be imported into the United States in accordance with this section only if the plant protection service of the country in which the irradiation facility is located has entered into a trust fund agreement with APHIS. That agreement requires the plant protection service to pay, in advance of each shipping season, all costs that APHIS estimates it will incur in providing inspection and treatment monitoring services at the irradiation facility during that shipping season. Those costs include administrative expenses and all salaries (including overtime and the Federal share of employee benefits), travel expenses (including per diem expenses), and other incidental expenses incurred by APHIS in performing these services. The agreement will describe the general nature and scope of APHIS services provided at irradiation facilities covered by the agreement, such as whether APHIS inspectors will monitor operations continuously or intermittently, and will generally describe the extent of inspections APHIS will perform on articles prior to and after irradiation. The agreement requires the plant protection service to deposit a certified or cashier's check with APHIS for the amount of those costs, as estimated by APHIS. If the deposit is not sufficient to meet all costs incurred by APHIS, the agreement further requires the plant protection service to deposit with APHIS a certified or cashier's check for the amount of the remaining costs, as determined by APHIS, before any more articles irradiated in that country may be imported into the United States. After a final audit at the conclusion of each shipping season, any overpayment of funds would be returned to the plant protection service or held on account until needed, at the option of the plant protection service.

(g) Packaging. Fruits and vegetables that are irradiated in accordance with this section must be packaged in cartons in the following manner:

(1) All fruits and vegetables treated with irradiation must be shipped in the same cartons in which they are treated. Irradiated fruits and vegetables may not be packaged for shipment in a carton with nonirradiated fruits and vegetables.

(2) For all fruits and vegetables irradiated prior to arrival in the United States:

(i) The fruits and vegetables to be irradiated must be packaged either:

(A) In insect-proof cartons that have no openings that will allow the entry of fruit flies. The cartons must be sealed with seals that will visually indicate if the cartons have been opened. The cartons may be constructed of any material that prevents the entry of fruit flies and prevents oviposition by fruit flies into the articles in the carton [3] ; or

(B) In noninsect-proof cartons that are stored immediately after irradiation in a room completely enclosed by walls or screening that completely precludes access by fruit flies. If stored in noninsect-proof cartons in a room that precludes access by fruit flies, prior to leaving the room each pallet of cartons must be completely enclosed in polyethylene, shrink-wrap, or another solid or netting covering that completely precludes access to the cartons by fruit flies.

(ii) To preserve the identity of treated lots, each pallet-load of cartons containing the fruits and vegetables must be wrapped before leaving the irradiation facility in one of the following ways:

(A) With polyethylene shrink wrap;

(B) With net wrapping; or

(C) With strapping so that each carton on an outside row of the pallet load is constrained by a metal or plastic strap.

(iii) Packaging must be labeled with treatment lot numbers, packing and treatment facility identification and location, and dates of packing and treatment. Pallets that remain intact as one unit until entry into the United States may have one such label per pallet. Pallets that are broken apart into smaller units prior to or during entry into the United States must have the required label information on each individual carton.

(h) Containers or vans. Containers or vans that will transport treated commodities must be free of pests prior to loading the treated commodities.

(i) Phytosanitary certificate. For each shipment treated in an irradiation facility outside the United States, a phytosanitary certificate, with the treatment section completed and issued by the national plant protection Start Printed Page 33319organization, must accompany the shipment.

(j) Dosimetry systems at the irradiation facility. (1) Dosimetry mapping must indicate the doses needed to ensure that all the commodity will receive the minimum dose prescribed.

(2) Absorbed dose must be measured using an accurate dosimetry system that ensures that the absorbed dose meets or exceeds the absorbed dose required by paragraph (a) of this section (150, 210, 225, 250, or 300 gray, depending on the target species of fruit fly or seed weevil).

(3) When designing the facility's dosimetry system and procedures for its operation, the facility operator must address guidance and principles from American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards [4] or an equivalent standard recognized by the Administrator.

(k) Records. An irradiation processor must maintain records of each treated lot for 1 year following the treatment date and must make these records available for inspection by an inspector during normal business hours (8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, except holidays). These records must include the lot identification, scheduled process, evidence of compliance with the scheduled process, ionizing energy source, source calibration, dosimetry, dose distribution in the product, and the date of irradiation.

(l) Request for certification and inspection of facility. Persons requesting certification of an irradiation treatment facility must submit the request for approval in writing to the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Plant Protection and Quarantine, Center for Plant Health Inspection and Technology, 1017 Main Campus Drive, suite 2500, Raleigh, NC 27606. The initial request must identify the owner, location, and radiation source of the facility, and the applicant must supply additional information about the facility construction, treatment protocols, and operations upon request by APHIS if APHIS requires additional information to evaluate the request. Before the Administrator determines whether an irradiation facility is eligible for certification, an inspector will make a personal inspection of the facility to determine whether it complies with the standards of this section.

(m) Denial and withdrawal of certification. (1) The Administrator will withdraw the certification of any irradiation treatment facility upon written request from the irradiation processor.

(2) The Administrator will deny or withdraw certification of an irradiation treatment facility when any provision of this section is not met. Before withdrawing or denying certification, the Administrator will inform the irradiation processor in writing of the reasons for the proposed action and provide the irradiation processor with an opportunity to respond. The Administrator will give the irradiation processor an opportunity for a hearing regarding any dispute of a material fact, in accordance with rules of practice that will be adopted for the proceeding. However, the Administrator will suspend certification pending final determination in the proceeding if he or she determines that suspension is necessary to prevent the spread of any dangerous insect. The suspension will be effective upon oral or written notification, whichever is earlier, to the irradiation processor. In the event of oral notification, written confirmation will be given to the irradiation processor within 10 days of the oral notification. The suspension will continue in effect pending completion of the proceeding and any judicial review of the proceeding.

(n) Department not responsible for damage. This treatment is approved to assure quarantine security against the listed fruit flies. From the literature available, the fruits and vegetables authorized for treatment under this section are believed tolerant to the treatment; however, the facility operator and shipper are responsible for determination of tolerance. The Department of Agriculture and its inspectors assume no responsibility for any loss or damage resulting from any treatment prescribed or monitored. Additionally, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission is responsible for ensuring that irradiation facilities are constructed and operated in a safe manner. Further, the Food and Drug Administration is responsible for ensuring that irradiated foods are safe and wholesome for human consumption.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0579-0155)

Irradiation treatment of regulated fruit to be moved interstate from areas quarantined for Mexican fruit fly.

Irradiation, carried out in accordance with the provisions of this paragraph, is approved as a treatment for any fruit listed as a regulated article in § 301.64-2(a) of this chapter.

(a) Approved facility. The irradiation treatment facility and treatment protocol must be approved by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. In order to be approved, a facility must:

(1) Be capable of administering a minimum absorbed ionizing radiation dose of 150 Gray (15 krad) to the fruit;[5]

(2) Be constructed so as to provide physically separate locations for treated and untreated fruit, except that fruit traveling by conveyor directly into the irradiation chamber may pass through an area that would otherwise be separated. The locations must be separated by a permanent physical barrier such as a wall or chain link fence 6 or more feet high to prevent transfer of cartons;

(3) Complete a compliance agreement with the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service as provided in § 301.64-6 of this chapter; and

(4) Be certified by Plant Protection and Quarantine for initial use and annually for subsequent use. Recertification is required in the event that an increase or decrease in radioisotope or a major modification to equipment that affects the delivered dose. Recertification may be required in cases where a significant variance in dose delivery is indicated.

(b) Treatment monitoring. Treatment must be carried out under the monitoring of an inspector. This monitoring must include inspection of treatment records and unannounced inspection visits to the facility by an inspector. Facilities that carry out continual irradiation operations must notify an inspector at least 24 hours before the date of operations. Facilities that carry out periodic irradiation operations must notify an inspector of scheduled operations at least 24 hours before scheduled operations.[6]

(c) Packaging. Fruits and vegetables that are treated within a quarantined area must be packaged in the following manner:

(1) The cartons must have no openings that will allow the entry of fruit flies and must be sealed with seals that will visually indicate if the cartons have been opened. They may be constructed of any material that prevents the entry of fruit flies and prevents oviposition by fruit flies into the fruit in the carton.[7]

(2) The pallet-load of cartons must be wrapped before it leaves the irradiation facility in one of the following ways:

(i) With polyethylene sheet wrap;

(ii) With net wrapping; or Start Printed Page 33320

(iii) With strapping so that each carton on an outside row of the pallet load is constrained by a metal or plastic strap.

(3) Packaging must be labeled with treatment lot numbers, packing and treatment facility identification and location, and dates of packing and treatment.

(d) Dosage. The fruits and vegetables must receive a minimum absorbed ionizing radiation dose of 150 Gray (15 krad).[8]

(e) Dosimetry systems. (1) Dosimetry mapping must indicate the dose needed to ensure the fruit will receive the minimum dose prescribed.

(2) Absorbed dose must be measured using an accurate dosimetry system that ensures that the absorbed dose meets or exceeds 150 Gray (15 krad).

(3) When designing the facility's dosimetry system and procedures for its operation, the facility operator must address guidance and principles from American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards.[9]

(f) Records. Records or invoices for each treated lot must be made available for inspection by an inspector during normal business hours (8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, except holidays). An irradiation processor must maintain records as specified in this section for a period of time that exceeds the shelf life of the irradiated food product by 1 year, and must make these records available for inspection by an inspector. These records must include the lot identification, scheduled process, evidence of compliance with the scheduled process, ionizing energy source, source calibration, dosimetry, dose distribution in the product, and the date of irradiation.

(g) Request for approval and inspection of facility. Persons requesting approval of an irradiation treatment facility and treatment protocol must submit the request for approval in writing to the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Plant Protection and Quarantine, Oxford Plant Protection Center, 901 Hillsboro St., Oxford, NC 27565. Before the Administrator determines whether an irradiation facility is eligible for approval, an inspector will make a personal inspection of the facility to determine whether it complies with the standards of paragraph (a) of this section.

(h) Denial and withdrawal of approval. (1) The Administrator will withdraw the approval of any irradiation treatment facility when the irradiation processor requests in writing the withdrawal of approval.

(2) The Administrator will deny or withdraw approval of an irradiation treatment facility when any provision of this section is not met. Before withdrawing or denying approval, the Administrator will inform the irradiation processor in writing of the reasons for the proposed action and provide the irradiation processor with an opportunity to respond. The Administrator will give the irradiation processor an opportunity for a hearing regarding any dispute of a material fact, in accordance with rules of practice that will be adopted for the proceeding. However, the Administrator will suspend approval pending final determination in the proceeding, if he or she determines that suspension is necessary to prevent the spread of any dangerous insect infestation. The suspension will be effective upon oral or written notification, whichever is earlier, to the irradiation processor. In the event of oral notification, written confirmation will be given to the irradiation processor within 10 days of the oral notification. The suspension will continue in effect pending completion of the proceeding and any judicial review of the proceeding.

(i) Department not responsible for damage. This treatment is approved to assure quarantine security against Mexican fruit fly. From the literature available, the fruits authorized for treatment under this section are believed tolerant to the treatment; however, the facility operator and shipper are responsible for determination of tolerance. The Department of Agriculture and its inspectors assume no responsibility for any loss or damage resulting from any treatment prescribed or supervised. Additionally, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission is responsible for ensuring that irradiation facilities are constructed and operated in a safe manner. Further, the Food and Drug Administration is responsible for ensuring that irradiated foods are safe and wholesome for human consumption.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0579-0215)

Irradiation treatment of regulated articles to be moved interstate from areas quarantined for Mediterranean fruit fly.

Irradiation, carried out in accordance with the provisions of this section, is approved as a treatment for any berry, fruit, nut, or vegetable listed as a regulated article in § 301.78-2(a) of this chapter.

(a) Approved facility. The irradiation treatment facility and treatment protocol must be approved by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. In order to be approved, a facility must:

(1) Be capable of administering a minimum absorbed ionizing radiation dose of 225 Gray (22.5 krad) to the fruits and vegetables; [10]

(2) Be constructed so as to provide physically separate locations for treated and untreated fruits and vegetables, except that fruits and vegetables traveling by conveyor directly into the irradiation chamber may pass through an area that would otherwise be separated. The locations must be separated by a permanent physical barrier such as a wall or chain link fence 6 or more feet high to prevent transfer of cartons;

(3) Complete a compliance agreement with the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service as provided in § 301.78-6 of this chapter; and

(4) Be certified by Plant Protection and Quarantine for initial use and annually for subsequent use. Recertification is required in the event that an increase or decrease in radioisotope or a major modification to equipment that affects the delivered dose. Recertification may be required in cases where a significant variance in dose delivery is indicated.

(b) Treatment monitoring. Treatment must be carried out under the monitoring of an inspector. This monitoring must include inspection of treatment records and unannounced inspection visits to the facility by an inspector. Facilities that carry out continual irradiation operations must notify an inspector at least 24 hours before the date of operations. Facilities that carry out periodic irradiation operations must notify an inspector of scheduled operations at least 24 hours before scheduled operations.[11]

(c) Packaging. Fruits and vegetables that are treated within a quarantined area must be packaged in the following manner:

(1) The cartons must have no openings that will allow the entry of fruit flies and must be sealed with seals that will visually indicate if the cartons have been opened. They may be constructed of any material that prevents the entry of fruit flies and prevents oviposition by fruit flies into the fruit in the carton.[12]

(2) The pallet-load of cartons must be wrapped before it leaves the irradiation facility in one of the following ways:

(i) With polyethylene sheet wrap;

(ii) With net wrapping; or Start Printed Page 33321

(iii) With strapping so that each carton on an outside row of the pallet load is constrained by a metal or plastic strap.

(3) Packaging must be labeled with treatment lot numbers, packing and treatment facility identification and location, and dates of packing and treatment.

(d) Dosage. The fruits and vegetables must receive a minimum absorbed ionizing radiation dose of 225 Gray (22.5 krad).[13]

(e) Dosimetry systems. (1) Dosimetry must demonstrate that the absorbed dose, including areas of minimum and maximum dose, is mapped, controlled, and recorded.

(2) Absorbed dose must be measured using a dosimetry system that can accurately measure an adsorbed dose of 225 Gray (22.5 krad).

(3) The utilization of the dosimetry system, including its calibration and the number and placement of dosimeters used, must be in accordance with the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards.[14]

(f) Records. Records or invoices for each treated lot must be made available for inspection by an inspector during normal business hours (8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, except holidays). An irradiation processor must maintain records as specified in this section for a period of time that exceeds the shelf life of the irradiated food product by 1 year, and must make these records available for inspection by an inspector. These records must include the lot identification, scheduled process, evidence of compliance with the scheduled process, ionizing energy source, source calibration, dosimetry, dose distribution in the product, and the date of irradiation.

(g) Request for approval and inspection of facility. Persons requesting approval of an irradiation treatment facility and treatment protocol must submit the request for approval in writing to the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Plant Protection and Quarantine, Oxford Plant Protection Center, 901 Hillsboro St., Oxford, NC 27565. Before the Administrator determines whether an irradiation facility is eligible for approval, an inspector will make a personal inspection of the facility to determine whether it complies with the standards of paragraph (a) of this section.

(h) Denial and withdrawal of approval. (1) The Administrator will withdraw the approval of any irradiation treatment facility when the irradiation processor requests in writing the withdrawal of approval.

(2) The Administrator will deny or withdraw approval of an irradiation treatment facility when any provision of this section is not met. Before withdrawing or denying approval, the Administrator will inform the irradiation processor in writing of the reasons for the proposed action and provide the irradiation processor with an opportunity to respond. The Administrator will give the irradiation processor an opportunity for a hearing regarding any dispute of a material fact, in accordance with rules of practice that will be adopted for the proceeding. However, the Administrator will suspend approval pending final determination in the proceeding, if he or she determines that suspension is necessary to prevent the spread of any dangerous insect infestation. The suspension will be effective upon oral or written notification, whichever is earlier, to the irradiation processor. In the event of oral notification, written confirmation will be given to the irradiation processor within 10 days of the oral notification. The suspension will continue in effect pending completion of the proceeding and any judicial review of the proceeding.

(i) Department not responsible for damage. This treatment is approved to assure quarantine security against Mediterranean fruit fly. From the literature available, the fruits and vegetables authorized for treatment under this section are believed tolerant to the treatment; however, the facility operator and shipper are responsible for determination of tolerance. The Department of Agriculture and its inspectors assume no responsibility for any loss or damage resulting from any treatment prescribed or supervised. Additionally, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission is responsible for ensuring that irradiation facilities are constructed and operated in a safe manner. Further, the Food and Drug Administration is responsible for ensuring that irradiated foods are safe and wholesome for human consumption.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0579-0088)

Administrative instructions prescribing methods for irradiation treatment of certain fruits and vegetables from Hawaii.

(a) Approved irradiation treatment. Irradiation, carried out in accordance with the provisions of this section, is approved as a treatment for the following fruits and vegetables at the specified dose levels:

Irradiation for Plant Pests in Hawaiian Fruits and Vegetables

CommodityDose (Gray)
Abiu250
Atemoya250
Bell pepper250
Carambola250
Eggplant250
Litchi250
Longan250
Mango300
Papaya250
Pineapple (other than smooth Cayenne)250
Rambutan250
Sapodilla250
Italian squash250
Sweetpotato400
Tomato250

(b) Conditions of movement. Fruits and vegetables from Hawaii may be authorized for movement in accordance with this section only if the following conditions are met:

(1) Location. The irradiation treatment must be carried out at an approved facility in Hawaii or on the mainland United States. Fruits and vegetables authorized under this section for treatment on the mainland may be treated in any State on the mainland United States except Alabama, Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, or Virginia. Prior to treatment, the fruits and vegetables may not move into or through Alabama, Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, or Virginia, except that movement is allowed through Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas, as an authorized stop for air cargo, or as a transloading location for shipments that arrive by air but that are subsequently transloaded into trucks for overland movement from Dallas/Fort Worth into an authorized State by the shortest route.

(2) Approved facility. The irradiation treatment facility and treatment protocol must be approved by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. In order to be approved, a facility must:

(i) Be capable of administering the minimum absorbed ionizing radiation doses specified in paragraph (a) of this section to the fruits and vegetables;[15]

(ii) Be constructed so as to provide physically separate locations for treated and untreated fruits and vegetables, except that fruits and vegetables traveling by conveyor directly into the Start Printed Page 33322irradiation chamber may pass through an area that would otherwise be separated. The locations must be separated by a permanent physical barrier such as a wall or chain link fence six or more feet high to prevent transfer of cartons. Untreated fruits and vegetables shipped to the mainland United States from Hawaii in accordance with this section may not be packaged for shipment in a carton with treated fruits and vegetables;

(iii) Complete a compliance agreement with the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service as provided in § 318.13-4(d) of this chapter; and

(iv) Be certified by Plant Protection and Quarantine for initial use and annually for subsequent use. Recertification is required in the event that an increase or decrease in radioisotope or a major modification to equipment that affects the delivered dose. Recertification may be required in cases where a significant variance in dose delivery is indicated.

(3) Treatment monitoring. Treatment must be carried out under the monitoring of an inspector. This monitoring must include inspection of treatment records and unannounced inspectional visits to the facility by an inspector. Facilities that carry out continual irradiation operations must notify an inspector at least 24 hours before the date of operations. Facilities that carry out periodic irradiation operations must notify an inspector of scheduled operations at least 24 hours before scheduled operations.[16]

(4) Packaging. (i) Fruits and vegetables that are treated in Hawaii must be packaged in the following manner:

(A) The cartons must have no openings that will allow the entry of fruit flies and must be sealed with seals that will visually indicate if the cartons have been opened. They may be constructed of any material that prevents the entry of fruit flies and prevents oviposition by fruit flies into the fruit in the carton.[17]

(B) The pallet-load of cartons must be wrapped before it leaves the irradiation facility in one of the following ways:

(1) With polyethylene sheet wrap;

(2) With net wrapping; or

(3) With strapping so that each carton on an outside row of the pallet load is constrained by a metal or plastic strap.

(C) Packaging must be labeled with treatment lot numbers, packing and treatment facility identification and location, and dates of packing and treatment.

(ii) Cartons of untreated fruits and vegetables that are moving to the mainland United States for treatment must be shipped in shipping containers sealed prior to interstate movement with seals that will visually indicate if the shipping containers have been opened.

(iii) Litchi and longan from Hawaii may not be moved interstate into Florida. All cartons in which litchi or longan are packed must be stamped “Not for importation into or distribution in FL.”

(5) Dosage. The fruits and vegetables must receive the minimum absorbed ionizing radiation dose specified in paragraph (a) of this section.[18]

(6) Dosimetry systems. (i) Dosimetry must demonstrate that the absorbed dose, including areas of minimum and maximum dose, is mapped, controlled, and recorded.

(ii) Absorbed dose must be measured using a dosimeter that can accurately measure the absorbed doses specified in paragraph (a) of this section.

(iii) The number and placement of dosimeters used must be in accordance with American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards.[19]

(7)(i) Certification on basis of treatment. A certificate shall be issued by an inspector for the movement of fruits and vegetables from Hawaii that have been treated and handled in Hawaii in accordance with this section. To be certified for interstate movement under this section, litchi from Hawaii must be inspected in Hawaii and found free of the litchi fruit moth (Cryptophlebia spp.) and other plant pests by an inspector before undergoing irradiation treatment in Hawaii for fruit flies, and sweetpotato from Hawaii must be inspected in Hawaii and found free of the gray pineapple mealybug (Dysmicoccus neobrevipes) and the Kona coffee-root knot nematode (Meloidogyne konaensis) by an inspector before undergoing irradiation treatment in Hawaii.

(ii) Limited permit. A limited permit shall be issued by an inspector for the interstate movement of untreated fruits and vegetables from Hawaii for treatment on the mainland United States in accordance with this section. To be eligible for a limited permit under this section, untreated litchi from Hawaii must be inspected in Hawaii and found free of the litchi fruit moth (Cryptophlebia spp.) and other plant pests by an inspector, and untreated sweetpotato from Hawaii must be inspected in Hawaii and found to be free of the gray pineapple mealybug (Dysmicoccus neobrevipes) and the Kona coffee-root knot nematode (Meloidogyne konaensis) by an inspector.

(8) Records. Records or invoices for each treated lot must be made available for inspection by an inspector during normal business hours (8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, except holidays). An irradiation processor must maintain records as specified in this section for a period of time that exceeds the shelf life of the irradiated food product by 1 year, and must make these records available for inspection by an inspector. These records must include the lot identification, scheduled process, evidence of compliance with the scheduled process, ionizing energy source, source calibration, dosimetry, dose distribution in the product, and the date of irradiation.

(c) Request for approval and inspection of facility. Persons requesting approval of an irradiation treatment facility and treatment protocol must submit the request for approval in writing to the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Plant Protection and Quarantine, Center for Plant Health Science and Technology, 1017 Main Campus Drive, suite 2500, Raleigh, NC 27606. Before the Administrator determines whether an irradiation facility is eligible for approval, an inspector will make a personal inspection of the facility to determine whether it complies with the standards of paragraph (b)(2) of this section.

(d) Denial and withdrawal of approval. (1) The Administrator will withdraw the approval of any irradiation treatment facility when the irradiation processor requests in writing the withdrawal of approval.

(2) The Administrator will deny or withdraw approval of an irradiation treatment facility when any provision of this section is not met. Before withdrawing or denying approval, the Administrator will inform the irradiation processor in writing of the reasons for the proposed action and provide the irradiation processor with an opportunity to respond. The Administrator will give the irradiation processor an opportunity for a hearing regarding any dispute of a material fact, in accordance with rules of practice that will be adopted for the proceeding. However, the Administrator will suspend approval pending final determination in the proceeding, if he or she determines that suspension is necessary to prevent the spread of any dangerous insect infestation. The suspension will be effective upon oral or written notification, whichever is earlier, to the irradiation processor. In Start Printed Page 33323the event of oral notification, written confirmation will be given to the irradiation processor within 10 days of the oral notification. The suspension will continue in effect pending completion of the proceeding and any judicial review of the proceeding.

(e) Department not responsible for damage. This treatment is approved to assure quarantine security against the Trifly complex and other plant pests. From the literature available, the fruits and vegetables authorized for treatment under this section are believed tolerant to the treatment; however, the facility operator and shipper are responsible for determination of tolerance. The Department of Agriculture and its inspectors assume no responsibility for any loss or damage resulting from any treatment prescribed or supervised. Additionally, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission is responsible for ensuring that irradiation facilities are constructed and operated in a safe manner. Further, the Food and Drug Administration is responsible for ensuring that irradiated foods are safe and wholesome for human consumption.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0579-0198)

Subpart—Treatments for Garbage

Garbage treatment schedules for insect pests and pathogens.

(a) T415-a, heat treatment. Incinerate to ash. Caterers under compliance agreement using an incinerator for garbage must comply with the following conditions:

(1) Incinerator must be capable of reducing garbage to ash.

(2) Incinerator must be maintained adequately to ensure operation.

(b) T415-b, dry heat or steam. The garbage must be heated to an internal temperature of 212 °F for 30 minutes followed by burial in a landfill.

(1) The sterilizer used to perform the treatment must be capable of heating garbage to an internal temperature of 212 °F and maintaining it at that temperature for a minimum of 30 minutes.

(2) The sterilization cycle must be reevaluated and adjusted twice a year using thermocouple to recalibrate the temperature recording device. Adjusting the sterilization cycle semiannually will ensure that all garbage processed is heated to a minimum internal temperature of 212 °F for at least 30 minutes and that the temperature recording device accurately reflects the internal temperature of the sterilizer.

(3) The caterer administering the treatment under a compliance agreement must comply with the following conditions:

(i) The operator must date and initial time/temperature records for each batch of garbage sterilized. The supervisor must review and sign each time/temperature record. The facility must retain records for 6 months for review by APHIS.

(ii) The drain in the bottom of the sterilizer must be cleaned between each cycle to ensure proper heat circulation.

(4) All reevaluations and adjustments must be observed by APHIS.

(c) T415-c, grinding and discharge into a sewage system. The sewage system must be approved by the Administrator upon his/her determination that the system is designed and operated in such a way as to preclude the discharge of sewage effluents onto land surface or into lagoons or other stationary waters and otherwise is adequate to prevent the spread of plant pests and livestock or poultry diseases.

[Reserved]

Subpart—Miscellaneous Treatments

Miscellaneous treatment schedules.

(a) T102-b, T102-b-1, T102-b-2, soapy water and wax. (1) The fruit must be immersed in a soapy water bath of one part soap solution (such as Deterfrut) to 3,000 parts water for 20 seconds.

(2) The soapy bath must be followed with a pressure shower rinse to remove all excess soap.

(3) The fruit must be immersed for 20 seconds in an undiluted wax coating (such as Johnson's Wax Primafresh 31 Kosher fruit coating). The wax coating must cover the entire surface of the fruit.

(b) T102-c, warm, soapy water and brushing for durian and other large fruits such as breadfruit. (1) Detergent (such as Deterfrut) must be added to warm water (110-120 °F) at the rate of one part detergent or soap to 3,000 parts water.

(2) The fruit must be immersed for at least 1 minute in the warm detergent water.

(3) The fruit must be scrubbed with a brush with stiff bristles to remove any insects.

(4) The fruit must be rinsed with a pressure shower to rinse the fruit free of residue (detergent and dead insects).

(5) An inspector will inspect each brushed and cleaned fruit. If any insects remain, the fruit must be retreated or destroyed.

(c) Three alternative treatments for plant material not tolerant to fumigation. Treatments are based on the character of the plant material and the type of pests that may be found.

(1) T201-p-1: For plant pests, except scale insects, hand removal of pests or infested parts of plants followed by a detailed inspection to ensure plants are pest free may be employed;

(2) See hand removal plus malathion-carbaryl chemical dip T201-p-2 (§ 305.10(d)) for alternative treatment; or

(3) T201-p-3: Following the hand removal of the visible plant pests or infested plant parts, the plant material must be treated with hot water at 112 °F for 20 minutes. This treatment is not effective against mature scale insects.

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PART 318—HAWAIIAN AND TERRITORIAL QUARANTINE NOTICES

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26. The authority citation for part 318 continues to read as follows:

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Authority: 7 U.S.C. 7701-7772; 7 CFR 2.22, 2.80, and 371.3.

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27. Section 318.13-4a is amended as follows:

End Amendment Part Start Amendment Part

a. By removing paragraphs (a) and (e).

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b. By redesignating paragraphs (b) through (d) as paragraphs (a) through (c), respectively.

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c. By revising newly redesignated paragraph (a) to read as set forth below.

End Amendment Part
Administrative instructions authorizing the movement from Hawaii of frozen fruits and vegetables.

(a) The Administrator of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, pursuant to the authority contained in §§ 318.13-2(b) and 318.13-4(b), approves the process of quick freezing in accordance with part 305 of this chapter as a treatment for all fruits and vegetables described in § 318.13, except as otherwise provided in paragraph (c) of this section. Such frozen fruits and vegetables may be certified for movement from Hawaii into or through any other Territory, State, or District of the United States.[1]

* * * * *
[Amended]
Start Amendment Part

28. Section 318.13-4b is amended as follows:

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a. In paragraph (b), by removing the words “the Plant Protection and Quarantine (PPQ) Treatment Manual, which is incorporated by reference at § 300.1” and adding the words “part 305” in their place.

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b. In paragraph (f), by removing the words “the PPQ Treatment Manual” and

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[Amended]
Start Amendment Part

29. Section 318.13-4f, paragraph (c), is amended by removing the address “Oxford Plant Protection Center, 901 Hillsboro St., Oxford, NC 27565” and adding the address “Center for Plant Health Science and Technology, 1017 Main Campus Drive, suite 2500, Raleigh, NC 27606” in its place.

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[Amended]
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30. Section 318.13-11 is amended by removing the words “the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual” and adding the words “part 305 of this chapter” in their place; and by removing the last sentence.

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[Amended]
Start Amendment Part

31. In § 318.58, paragraph (b) is amended by removing the word “Deputy” and the words “of the Plant Protection and Quarantine Programs”; and by removing the word “he” and adding the words “the Administrator” in its place, both times it occurs.

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[Amended]
Start Amendment Part

32. Section 318.58-2 is amended as follows:

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a. In paragraph (b)(1), in the entry for mangoes, by removing the words “the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual, which is incorporated by reference at § 300.1” and adding the words “part 305” in their place; and in footnote 1, by removing the words “the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual” and adding the words “part 305 of this chapter” in their place.

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b. In paragraph (b)(2), by removing the word “him” and adding the words “the inspector” in its place; and by removing the word “he” and adding the words “the inspector” in its place.

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c. In paragraph (b)(4), by removing the words “the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual” and adding the words “part 305 of this chapter” in their place.

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[Amended]
Start Amendment Part

33. Section § 318.58-4 is amended as follows:

End Amendment Part Start Amendment Part

a. In paragraph (a), by removing the word “he” and adding the words “the inspector” in its place.

End Amendment Part Start Amendment Part

b. In paragraph (b), first sentence, by removing the words “the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual” and adding the words “part 305 of this chapter” in their place; and by removing the second sentence.

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34. Section § 318.58-4a is amended as follows:

End Amendment Part Start Amendment Part

a. By removing paragraphs (a) and (e).

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b. By redesignating paragraphs (b) through (d) as paragraphs (a) and (c), respectively.

End Amendment Part Start Amendment Part

c. In newly redesignated paragraph (c), by removing the words “Deputy Administrator of the Plant Protection and Quarantine Programs” and by adding the word “Administrator” in their place.

End Amendment Part
Administrative instructions authorizing the movement from Puerto Rico of frozen fruits and vegetables.

(a) The Administrator of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, pursuant to the authority contained in §§ 318.58-2 and 318.58-3, approves the process of quick freezing in accordance with part 305 of this chapter as a treatment for all fruits and vegetables described in § 318.58-2, except as otherwise provided in paragraph (c) of this section. Such frozen fruits and vegetables may be certified for movement from Puerto Rico into or through any other Territory, State, or District of the United States in accordance with § 318.58-3.[2]

* * * * *
[Amended]
Start Amendment Part

35. Section 318.58-11 is amended by removing the words “the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual” and adding the words “part 305 of this chapter” in their place, and by removing the last sentence.

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[Amended]
Start Amendment Part

36. In § 318.82, paragraph (b) is amended by adding the words “or she” immediately after the word “he”, both times it occurs.

End Amendment Part Start Part

PART 319—FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES

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37. The authority citation for part 319 continues to read as follows:

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Authority: 7 U.S.C. 450 and 7701-7772; 21 U.S.C. 136 and 136a; 7 CFR 2.22, 2.80, and 371.3.

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[Amended]
Start Amendment Part

38. In § 319.8(a), the second sentence is amended by adding the words “or she” immediately after the word “he”, both times it occurs.

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[Amended]
Start Amendment Part

39. In § 319.8-3, paragraphs (a) and (b) are amended by adding the words “or she” immediately after the word “he”.

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[Amended]
Start Amendment Part

40. In § 319.8-6, the third sentence is amended by removing the word “him” and adding the words “the inspector” in its place.

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[Amended]
Start Amendment Part

41. In § 319.8-24, paragraphs (a), (b), and (c) are amended by adding the words “or her” immediately after the word “his”.

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[Amended]
Start Amendment Part

42. In § 319.37-4, paragraph (b) is amended by removing the words “the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual” and by adding the words “part 305 of this chapter” in their place, and by removing footnote 6.

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[Amended]
Start Amendment Part

43. In § 319.37-5, paragraph (e) is amended by redesignating footnote 7 as footnote 6.

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44. Section 319.37-6 is amended as follows:

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a. In paragraph (a), by removing footnote 8.

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b. In paragraphs (a), (b), (c), and (f), by removing the words “the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual” and adding the words “part 305 of this chapter” in their place.

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c. In paragraph (d)(1), by removing the words “the PPQ Treatment Manual” and adding the words “part 305 of this chapter” in their place.

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d. In paragraph (d)(2), by redesignating footnote 9 as footnote 8, and by revising newly redesignated footnote 8 to read as follows:

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Specific treatment and other requirements.
* * * * *

(d) * * *

(2) * * *[3]

* * * * *
[Amended]
Start Amendment Part

45. In § 319.37-7, paragraph (e), footnote 10 is redesignated as footnote 9.

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46. In § 319.37-8, paragraph (e), footnote 11 is redesignated as footnote 10.

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47. In § 319.37-13, paragraph (a), footnote 12 is redesignated as footnote 11.

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Start Amendment Part

48. Section 319.40-1 is amended by removing the definition of

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[Amended]
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49. Section 319.40-5 is amended as follows:

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a. In paragraph (g)(1), by removing the words “the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual, which is incorporated by reference at § 300.1” and by adding the words “part 305” in their place.

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b. In paragraph (g)(2)(i) and paragraph (i), by removing the words “the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual,” and adding the words “part 305 of this chapter,” in their place.

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50. Section 319.40-7 is amended as follows:

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a. In paragraphs (f)(1)(i) and (f)(3)(i), by removing the words “the Treatment Manual” and adding the words “part 305 of this chapter” in their place.

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b. By revising paragraphs (f)(1)(ii), (f)(2), and (f)(3)(ii) to read as set forth below.

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Treatments and safeguards.
* * * * *

(f) * * *

(1) * * *

(ii) T-404 schedule. The entire log and the ambient air must be at a temperature of 5 °C or more above throughout fumigation. The fumigation must be conducted using schedule T-404 contained in part 305 of this chapter.

(2) Lumber. The lumber and the ambient air must be at a temperature of 5 °C or more above throughout fumigation. The fumigation must be conducted using schedule T-404 contained in part 305 of this chapter.

(3) * * *

(ii) If the ambient air and the regulated articles other than logs or lumber are at a temperature of 4.5-20.5 °C throughout fumigation, the fumigation must be conducted using schedule T-404 contained in part 305 of this chapter.

* * * * *
[Amended]
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51. In § 319.40-8, paragraph (a) is amended by removing the words “the Treatment Manual” and adding the words “part 305 of this chapter” in their place.

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52. In § 319.40-9, paragraph (b)(2) is amended by removing the words “the Treatment Manual” and adding the words “part 305 of this chapter” in their place.

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53. In § 319.56-2, paragraph (k) is amended by removing the citation “§ 305.2(a)” and adding the citation “§ 305.31(a)” in its place; and by removing the words “or the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual”.

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54. Section 319.56-2c is revised to read as follows:

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Administrative instructions authorizing the importation of frozen fruits and vegetables.

(a) The Administrator, under authority contained in § 319.56-2, prescribes quick freezing in accordance with part 305 of this chapter as a satisfactory treatment for all fruits and vegetables enterable under permit under § 319.56. Such frozen fruits and vegetables may be imported from any country under permit and in compliance with §§ 319.56-1 through 319.56-7 (exclusive of non-related administrative instructions), at such ports as authorized in the permits.

(b) The importation from foreign countries of frozen fruits and vegetables is not authorized when such fruits and vegetables are subject to attack in the area of origin, by plant pests that may not, in the judgment of the Administrator, be destroyed by quick freezing.

[Amended]
Start Amendment Part

55. In § 319.56-2d, paragraph (a) is amended by removing the words “the Plant Protection and Quarantine (PPQ) Treatment Manual, which is incorporated by reference at § 300.1” and adding the words “part 305” in their place; and by removing the words “the PPQ Treatment Manual” and adding the words “part 305 of this chapter” in their place.

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Start Amendment Part

56. In § 319.56-2e, paragraph (b), is amended by removing the words “assure himself of” and adding the word “ensure” in their place.

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57. In § 319.56-2g, paragraph (a), is amended by removing the words “the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual, which is incorporated by reference at § 300.1” and adding the words “part 305” in their place.

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[Amended]
Start Amendment Part

58. Section 319.56-h is amended as follows:

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a. In paragraph (a)(2), by removing the words “the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual” and adding the words “part 305 of this chapter” in their place.

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b. In paragraph (b), by removing the words “the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual, which is incorporated by reference at § 300.1” and adding the words “part 305” in their place.

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c. In paragraph (d), by removing the words “the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual” and adding the words “part 305” in their place.

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[Amended]
Start Amendment Part

59. Section 319.56-2i is amended as follows:

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a. In paragraph (a), by removing the words “the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual” and adding the words “part 305 of this chapter” in their place, and by removing the last sentence.

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b. In paragraph (b), by removing the words “the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual” and adding the words “part 305 of this chapter” in their place.

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[Amended]
Start Amendment Part

60. Section 319.56-2j is amended as follows:

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a. In paragraph (a)(2), by removing the words “the PPQ Treatment Manual, which is incorporated by reference in § 300.1 of this chapter” and adding the words “part 305 of this chapter” in their place.

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b. In paragraph (a)(4), by removing the words “the PPQ Treatment Manual” the first time they occur and adding the words “part 305 of this chapter must” in their place.

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c. In paragraph (a)(6), by removing the words “the PPQ Treatment Manual” and adding the words “part 305 of this chapter” in their place.

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61. In § 319.56-2k, paragraph (a), is revised to read as follows:

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Administrative instructions prescribing method of fumigation of field-grown grapes from specified countries.
* * * * *

(a) Continental countries of southern and middle Europe, North Africa, and the Near East. As used in this section, the term “continental countries of southern and middle Europe, North Africa, and the Near East” means Algeria, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Egypt, Estonia, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Israel, Italy, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Libya, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Portugal, Republic of Moldova, Russian Federation, Spain, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan.

* * * * *
[Amended]
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62. In § 319.56-2n, the introductory text is amended by removing the citation

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63. In § 319.56-2p, paragraph (f) is amended by removing the words “the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual” and adding the words “part 305 of this chapter” in their place, and by removing the second and third sentences.

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64. In § 319.56-2q, paragraph (b) is amended by removing the words “the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual, which is incorporated by reference at § 300.1” and adding the words “part 305” in their place.

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65. Section 319.56-2r is amended as follows:

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a. In paragraphs (c)(3)(iii) and (d)(1)(ii) by removing the words “the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual” and adding the words “part 305 of this chapter” in their place, each time they occur.

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b. In paragraph (g)(2), by removing the words “the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual, which is incorporated by reference at § 300.1” and adding the words “part 305” in their place.

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66. Section 319.56-2s is amended as follows:

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a. In paragraph (d)(1)(i), by removing the words “the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual” and adding the words “part 305 of this chapter” in their place each time they occur.

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b. In paragraph (f)(2), by removing the words “the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual, which is incorporated by reference at § 300.1” and adding the words “part 305” in their place.

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67. In § 319.52-2v, paragraph (c) is amended by removing the citation “§ 319.56-2d(f)” and adding the citation “§ 319.56-2(f)” in its place; by removing the words “the Plant Protection and Quarantine (PPQ) Treatment Manual” and “PPQ Treatment Manual” and adding the words “part 305 of this chapter” in their place; and by removing the words “the PPQ Treatment Manual, which is incorporated by reference at § 300.1” and adding the words “part 305” in their place.

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68. In § 319.56-2x, paragraph (a), introductory text, is amended by removing the words “the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual, which is incorporated by reference at § 300.1” and adding the words “part 305” in their place; and by removing the last sentence.

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69. In § 319.56-2cc, paragraph (a) is amended by removing the words “the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual, which is incorporated by reference at § 300.1” and adding the words “part 305” in their place.

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70. In § 319.56-2dd , paragraph (d)(1) is amended by removing the words “the PPQ Treatment Manual, which is incorporated by reference at § 300.1” and adding the words “part 305” in their place.

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71. In § 319.56-2ee, paragraph (b) is amended by removing the words “the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual, which is incorporated by reference at § 300.1” and adding the words “part 305” in their place.

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72. In § 319.56-2jj, paragraph (g) is amended by removing the words “the Plant Protection and Quarantine (PPQ) Treatment Manual, which is incorporated by reference at § 300.1” and adding the words “part 305” in their place.

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73. Section 319.56-2mm is amended as follows:

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a. In paragraph (b), by removing the words “the Plant Protection and Quarantine (PPQ) Treatment Manual, which is incorporated by reference at § 300.1 of this chapter” and adding the words “part 305 of this chapter” in their place.

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b. In paragraph (d)(4)(ii)(B), by removing the words “the PPQ Treatment Manual” and adding the words “part 305 of this chapter” in their place.

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c. In paragraph (e), by removing the words “PPQ Treatment Manual, which is incorporated by reference in § 300.1 of this chapter” and adding the words “part 305 of this chapter” in their place.

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74. In § 319.56-5, paragraphs (a) and (b) are amended by adding the words “or her” immediately after the word “his” both times it occurs.

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75. Section 319.69-4 is amended by removing the word “he” and adding the words “the inspector” in its place each time it occurs.

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76. Section 319.75-4 is amended as follows:

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a. By removing footnote 6.

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b. In the introductory paragraph, by removing the words “under the supervision of an inspector”; and by removing the words “as set forth below” and adding the words “in accordance with part 305 of this chapter” in their place.

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c. By removing paragraphs (a), (b), and (c).

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77. In § 319.77-4, paragraphs (a)(2)(i) and (b)(2)(i)(A) are amended by removing the words “the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual, which is incorporated by reference at § 300.1” and adding the words “part 305” in their place.

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Done in Washington, DC, this day 5th of May 2005.

Administrator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

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Footnotes

1.  Irradiation facilities may be located at the maritime ports of Gulfport, MS, or Wilmington, NC, or the airport of Atlanta, GA, if the following special conditions are met: The articles to be irradiated must be imported packaged in accordance with paragraph (g)(2)(i)(A) of this section; the irradiation facility and APHIS must agree in advance on the route by which shipments are allowed to move between the vessel on which they arrive and the irradiation facility; untreated articles may not be removed from their packaging prior to treatment under any circumstances; blacklight or sticky paper must be used within the irradiation facility, and other trapping methods, including Jackson/methyl eugenol and McPhail traps, must be used within the 4 square miles surrounding the facility; and the facility must have contingency plans, approved by APHIS, for safely destroying or disposing of fruit.

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2.  The maximum absorbed ionizing radiation dose and the irradiation of food is regulated by the Food and Drug Administration under 21 CFR part 179.

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3.  If there is a question as to the adequacy of a carton, send a request for approval of the carton, together with a sample carton, to the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Plant Protection and Quarantine, Center for Plant Health Inspection and Technology, 1017 Main Campus Drive, suite 2500, Raleigh, NC 27606.

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4.  Designation ISO/ASTM 51261-2002(E) , “Standard Guide for Selection and Calibration of Dosimetry Systems for Radiation Processing,” American Society for Testing and Materials, Annual Book of ASTM Standards.

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5.  See footnote 2 of this subpart.

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6.  Inspectors are assigned to local offices of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, which are listed in telephone directories.

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7.  See footnote 3 of this subpart.

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8.  See footnote 2 of this subpart.

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9.  See footnote 4 of this subpart.

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10.  See footnote 2 of this subpart.

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11.  See footnote 6 of this subpart.

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12.  See footnote 3 of this subpart.

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13.  See footnote 2 of this subpart.

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14.  See footnote 4 of this subpart.

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15.  See footnote 2 of this subpart.

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16.  See footnote 6 of this subpart.

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17.  See footnote 3 of this subpart.

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18.  See footnote 2 of this subpart.

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19.  See footnote 4 of this subpart.

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1.  Applications for certificates to move frozen fruits and vegetables from Hawaii under this subpart may be made to Plant Protection and Quarantine Programs, P.O. Box 9067, Honolulu, HI 96820.

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2.  Further information concerning the movement of frozen fruits and vegetables from Puerto Rico may be obtained from the Plant Protection and Quarantine Programs, Room 4, Post Office Bldg., P.O. Box 3386, San Juan, PR 00901.

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3.  Criteria for the approval of heat treatment facilities are contained in part 305 of this subpart.

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[FR Doc. 05-9387 Filed 6-6-05; 8:45 am]

BILLING CODE 3410-34-P