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Notice

Conference Entitled “Conservation Reserve Program: Planting for the Future”

Action

Notice Of Hud's Fy2004 Nofa Policy Requirements And General Section To The Fy2004 Super Nofa For Hud's Discretionary Programs (Notice).

Summary

USDA's Farm Service Agency (FSA) and the Department of Interior's U.S. Geological Survey are hosting a national conference on the future of the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP)—the Nation's largest conservation program.

 

Table of Contents Back to Top

Tables Back to Top

DATES: Back to Top

June 6-9, 2004. An optional field trip is planned for June 9, 2004, depending on attendee interest. Details will be announced at the conference.

ADDRESSES: Back to Top

The conference will be held at the University Park Holiday Inn, Fort Collins, Colorado. The field trip, if held, will be to the Pawnee National Grasslands and neighboring CRP fields, about 30 miles west of Fort Collins, Colorado. Transportation and directions for the field trip will be provided at the conference.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Back to Top

Alexander Barbarika, Natural Resources Analysis Group, Economic Policy and Analysis Group, Farm Service Agency, USDA, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, STOP 0516, Washington, DC 20250-0516; telephone: (202) 720-7093; FAX (202) 690-2186; email: Alexander.Barbarika@usda.gov.

Persons with disabilities who require special accommodation to attend or participate in the conference should contact Laurie Montgomery, telephone: (202) 205-7832; email: laurie.montgomery@usda.gov, by May 31, 2004.

Healthy Homes Demonstration Program Back to Top

Overview Information Back to Top

A. Federal Agency Name: Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control.

B. Funding Opportunity Title: Healthy Homes Demonstration Program.

C. Announcement Type: Initial announcement.

D. Funding Opportunity Number: The Federal Register number is: FR-4900-N-04. The OMB Paperwork approval number is 2539-0015.

E. Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number(s): 14.901 Healthy Homes Demonstration Program.

F. Dates: An original and three copies of your application must be submitted on or before July 13, 2004. See the General Section of the SuperNOFA Section IV, Application and submission Information, regarding application submission procedures and timely filing requirements.

G. Additional Overview Content Information: 1. Purpose of the Program. The purpose of the Healthy Homes Demonstration Program is to develop, demonstrate, and promote cost-effective, preventive measures to correct multiple safety and health hazards in the home environment that produce serious diseases and injuries in children of low-income families. Through the Healthy Homes Demonstration program, HUD will initiate competitive projects to promote implementation of available risk reduction techniques for the control of key hazards described in Appendix A.

2. Available Funds. HUD anticipates that approximately $5 million in Fiscal Year 2004 funds will be available.

3. Number of Awards. Approximately four to approximately six grants will be awarded, ranging from approximately $250,000 to approximately $1,000,000. The average award in 2003 was $845,000.

4. Eligible Applicants. Not-for-profit institutions, and for-profit firms located in the U.S., state and local governments, and federally recognized Indian Tribes are eligible to apply. For-profit firms are not allowed to include a fee in the cost proposal (i.e., no profit can be made from the project).

5. Type of Award. Grant.

6. Match. None required, but strongly encouraged.

7. Limitations. There are no limitations on the number of applications that each applicant can submit.

8. Information on Application. Information and procedures for completing an application are provided below.

Full Text of Announcement Back to Top

I. Funding Opportunity Description Back to Top

A. Background

The Healthy Homes Demonstration Program is a part of HUD's Healthy Homes Initiative (HHI). In April 1999, HUD submitted to Congress a preliminary plan containing a full description of the HHI. This description (Summary and Full Report) is available on the HUD Web site at: www.hud.gov; this site also contains additional information on the HHI and a link to its website.

The HHI builds upon HUD's existing housing-related health and safety issues, including lead hazard control, building structural safety, electrical safety, and fire protection to address multiple childhood diseases and injuries, such as asthma, mold-induced illness, carbon monoxide poisoning, and other conditions related to housing in a coordinated fashion. The HHI departs from the more traditional approach of attempting to correct one hazard at a time (e.g., asbestos, radon); a coordinated effort is feasible because a limited number of building deficiencies contribute to many hazards. Substantial savings are possible using this approach, because separate visits to a home by an inspector, public health nurse, or outreach worker can add significant costs to efforts to eliminate hazards.

In addition to deficiencies in basic housing facilities that may impact health, changes in the U.S. housing stock and more sophisticated epidemiological methods and biomedical research have led to the identification of new and often more subtle health hazards in the residential environment. While such hazards will tend to be found disproportionately in housing that is substandard (e.g., structural problems, lack of adequate heat, etc.), such housing-related environmental hazards may also exist in housing that is otherwise of good quality. Appendix A of this NOFA briefly describes the housing-associated health and injury hazards HUD considers key targets for intervention. Appendix D lists references that serve as the basis for the information provided in the Healthy Homes Demonstration Program NOFA.

B. Healthy Homes Initiative Goals

1. Mobilize public and private resources, involving cooperation among all levels of government, the private sector, and faith-based and other community-based organizations to develop the most promising, cost-effective methods for identifying and controlling housing-based hazards;

2. Build local capacity to operate sustainable programs that will prevent and control housing-based hazards in low- and very low-income residences when HUD funding is exhausted; and

3. Affirmatively further fair housing and environmental justice.

HUD is interested in promoting approaches that are cost-effective and efficient and that result in the reduction of health threats for the maximum number of residents for the long run, and, in particular, for children in low-income families. In addition, HUD encourages applicants to undertake specific activities that will assist the Department in implementing its Policy Priorities. HUD's Fiscal Year 2004 Policy Priorities are discussed in the General Section to the SuperNOFA (hereafter referred to as the General Section of the SuperNOFA).

Policy Priorities that are applicable to the Healthy Homes Demonstration NOFA are: (1) Improving our Nation's Communities (focus on distressed communities); (2) Providing Full and Equal Access to GrassRoots Faith-based or other Community-based Organizations in HUD Program Implementation; (3) Participation of Minority-Serving Institutions in HUD Programs and (4) Removal of Regulatory Barriers to Affordable Housing. Applicants that address these Policy priorities are eligible to earn additional points toward the overall score awarded their submission.

C. Healthy Homes Demonstration Objectives

HUD will initiate competitive projects that implement housing assessment, maintenance, renovation and construction techniques to identify and correct housing-related illness and injury risk factors, disseminate healthy homes information and replicate successful interventions. The objectives of the Healthy Homes Demonstration program include:

1. Identification of target areas and homes where assessment and interventions will occur;

2. Identification and evaluation of effective methods of hazard abatement and risk reduction;

3. Development of appropriately scaled, flexible, cost-effective and efficient assessment and intervention strategies that take into account the range of conditions likely to be encountered in housing, and that maximize the number of housing units that receive interventions;

4. Development of methodologies for evaluating intervention effectiveness;

5. Development of local capacity in target areas and training programs for target groups to operate sustainable programs to prevent and control housing-based hazards, especially in low- and very low-income residences;

6. Development of cost-effective protocols for identifying homes that are candidates for interventions, identifying hazards in these homes, and screening out homes where structural or other factors (e.g., cost) make interventions impractical;

7. Development and delivery of public outreach programs that provide information about effective methods for preventing housing-related childhood diseases and injuries and for promoting the use of these interventions;

8. Targeting, through education and outreach, specific high-risk communities and other identified audiences such as homeowners, landlords, health care deliverers, pregnant women, children, residential construction contractors, maintenance personnel, housing inspectors, real estate professionals, home buyers, and low-income minority families;

9. Implementation of media strategies to use print, radio and television to increase public awareness of housing-related hazards that threaten children, including the use of minority media, nonprofit organizations that work with persons with disabilities (including providing materials in alternative formats), advocates for racial and ethnic minorities (including providing materials in other languages for populations with Limited English Proficiency (LEP)), and faith-based organizations;

10. Dissemination of tools currently used by the applicant and/or tools available from other sources and, as needed, tools to be developed, to inform parents and caregivers about housing-related hazards and enable them to take prompt corrective action; and

11. Development of training programs for Healthy Homes activities to emphasize assessment and intervention methods applicable to public and private housing in target areas.

Specific project activities applicable to these objectives can be found under Rating Factor 3.1.b.

D. Authority

The authority for this program is sections 501 and 502 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1970 and the Consolidated Appropriations Resolution of 2004, Public Law 108-199.

II. Award Information Back to Top

A. Funding Available

Approximately $5 million in Fiscal Year 2004 funds is available for the Healthy Homes Demonstration Program Grants. Grants will be awarded on a competitive basis. HUD anticipates that approximately four to six grants will be awarded, ranging from approximately $250,000 to approximately $1,000,000. In fiscal year 2003, the average award was $845,000. The rating factors and selection process are discussed in Section V.

Abstracts of currently funded grantees are available on the Healthy Homes Web site at: www.hud.gov/healthyhomes. Applicants may wish to review these for program content and may also contact Project Directors for additional information.

B. Anticipated Start Date and Period of Performance for New Grants

The start date for new grants is expected to be October 1, 2004, with a period of performance not to exceed 36 months. HUD reserves the right to approve no cost time extensions for any grant under this program for a period not to exceed 12 months.

C. Type of Award Instrument

All awards in response to this NOFA will be made as grants. However, HUD will require quarterly reporting and will work closely with grantees to develop and monitor projects.

III. Eligibility Information Back to Top

A. Eligible Applicants

Not-for-profit institutions, and for-profit firms located in the U.S., Native American Tribes, state and local governments, and federally recognized Indian Tribes are eligible to apply. For-profit firms are not allowed to include a fee in the cost proposal (i.e., no profit can be made from the project).

B. Cost Sharing or Matching

Cost sharing or matching is not required. In rating your application, however, HUD will award a higher score under Rating Factor 4 (see Section V.d) if you provide evidence of significant cost sharing.

C. Other

1. Threshold Requirements Applicable to all Applicants Under the SuperNOFA

As an applicant, you must meet all of the threshold requirements described in the General Section of the SuperNOFA. Information about threshold requirements is provided in the General Section of the SuperNOFA. These requirements include the requirement to affirmatively further fair housing (AFFH). Applications that meet all of the threshold requirements will be eligible to be scored and ranked. Grants will be awarded on a competitive basis following evaluation of all proposals according to the rating factors described in the General Section of this SuperNOFA. A minimum score of 75 out of a possible 102, including EZ/EC bonus points, is required for award consideration.

Applications will not be rated or ranked if they do not meet the threshold requirements of the General Section of the SuperNOFA.

2. Eligible Activities

The following activities and support tasks are eligible under the Healthy Homes Demonstration grant program.

a. Performing evaluations of eligible housing to determine the presence of housing-based hazards (e.g., moisture intrusion, mold growth, pests and allergens, unvented appliances, exposed steam pipes or radiators, deteriorated lead-based paint) through the use of accepted assessment procedures.

b. Conducting housing interventions to remediate existing housing-based hazards and address conditions that could result in their recurrence. Refer to the HUD Guidelines for the Evaluation and Control of Lead-Based Paint Hazards in Housing (Guidelines) for information about conducting such remediation. The Guidelines and/or applicable regulations may be downloaded from the Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control's homepage, linked to HUD's website at: www.hud.gov.

c. Undertaking housing rehabilitation activities that are specifically required to carry out effective control of housing-based hazards, and without which the intervention could not be completed and maintained. Funds under this program may also be used to control lead-based paint hazards; however, such controls may not be a principal focus of the grant. Lead hazard control activities are carried out under HUD's Lead-Based Paint Hazard Control Grant Program.

d. Carrying out temporary relocation of families and individuals, when necessary, during the period in which intervention is conducted and until the time the affected unit receives clearance for re-occupancy.

e. Conducting medical examinations, when such examinations of young children for conditions caused or exacerbated by exposure to residential hazards are demonstrated to be critical to the outcome of your project, and there are no alternative sources to cover these costs.

f. Environmental sampling and medical testing recommended by a physician or applicable occupational or public health agency to protect the health of the intervention workers, supervisors, and contractors, unless reimbursable from another source.

g. Conducting testing, analysis, and mitigation for lead, mold, carbon monoxide and/or other housing-related hazards as appropriate, with respect to generally accepted standards or criteria, or if standards are unavailable, other appropriate levels justified in conjunction with the project. A laboratory recognized by the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) National Lead Laboratory Accreditation Program (NLLAP) must analyze clearance dust samples related to lead-based paint. It is recommended that samples to be analyzed for fungal species be submitted to a laboratory accredited in the Environmental Microbiological Laboratory Accreditation Program (EMLAP), administered by the American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA) and the American Association for Laboratory Accreditation (A2LA).

h. Carrying out architectural, engineering and work specification development and other construction management services to control housing-based hazards and remediate existing hazards.

i. Providing training on Healthy Homes practices to homeowners, renters, painters, remodelers, and housing maintenance staff working in low- or very low-income housing.

j. Providing cleaning supplies for hazard intervention and hazard control to faith-based or other community-based organizations for use by homeowners and tenants in low-income housing, or to such homeowners and tenants directly. (See the General Section of the SuperNOFA for more information about faith-based or other community-based organizations.)

k. Conducting general or targeted community education programs on environmental health and safety hazards. This activity would include, but not be restricted to, training on Healthy Homes maintenance and renovation practices. It would also include making materials available in alternative formats for persons with disabilities (e.g., Braille, audio, large type) upon request, and providing materials in languages other than English that are common in the community, consistent with HUD's published “Limited English Proficiency (LEP)” Recipient Guidance.

l. Securing liability insurance for hazard evaluation and control activities to be performed. This is not considered an administrative cost.

m. Supporting data collection, analysis, and evaluation of project activities. As a condition of the receipt of financial assistance under this NOFA all successful applicants will be required to cooperate with all HUD staff and contractors performing HUD funded research and evaluation studies.

n. Preparing quarterly progress reports and an overall final grant report detailing activities (e.g., number of units tested, hazards found, types of interventions provided, evaluation of the most cost-efficient methodologies by type of unit), findings, and recommended future actions for cost-effective interventions at the conclusion of grant activities.

3. Program Requirements

a. Work Activities. All lead hazard control activities must be conducted in compliance with the applicable requirements of HUD's Lead-Safe Housing Rule, 24 CFR Part 35, especially § 35.1325 for abatement and § 35.1330 for interim controls and as clarified in HUD's Interpretive Guidance about this rule. Activities must also comply with any additional requirements in effect under a state or Native American Tribal Lead-Based Paint Training and Certification Program that has been authorized by the EPA pursuant to 40 CFR 745.320.

b. Institutional Review Board Approval. In conformance with the Common rule (Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects, codified by HUD at 24 CFR part 60), if your research involves human subjects, your organization must provide an assurance (e.g., a letter signed by an appropriate official) that the research has been reviewed and approved by an IRB before you can initiate activities that require IRB approval. You must also provide the number for your organization's assurance (i.e., an “institutional assurance”) that has been approved by the Department of Health and Human Service's Office of Human Research Protections (OHRP). For additional information on what constitutes human subject research or how to obtain an institutional assurance see the OHRP website at: http://ohrp.osophs.dhhs.gov.

c. Program Performance. Grantees shall take all reasonable steps to accomplish all healthy homes activities within the approved period of performance. HUD will closely monitor the grantee's performance with particular attention to completion of specified activities, deliverables and milestones, and number of units proposed to be assessed or receive interventions within the approved period of performance. HUD reserves the right to terminate the grant prior to the expiration of the period of performance if the grantee fails to meet 25 percent of the milestones, including all deliverables, as scheduled in their work plan.

d. Certified and Trained Providers. Lead hazard control activities must be conducted by persons qualified for the activities according to 24 CFR Part 35 (possessing certification as abatement contractors, risk assessors, inspectors, abatement workers, or sampling technicians, or others having been trained in a HUD-approved course in lead-safe work practices).

e. Clearance Testing for Lead Hazard Control Activities. Clearance dust testing must be conducted according to the EPA Lead Hazards Standards Rule (40 CFR part 745) for abatement projects and the Lead-Safe Housing Rule (24 CFR part 35) for lead hazard control activities other than abatement. These are available at: www.epa.gov/lead and www.hud.gov, respectively.

f. All tests results related to lead-based paint must be provided to the owner of the unit, together with a notice describing the owner's legal duty to disclose the results to tenants and buyers. Disclosure of other housing-related hazards to the owner of the unit is encouraged but not required.

g. All pest control activities shall incorporate the principles and methods of integrated pest management (IPM). In technical terms, IPM is the coordinated use of pest and environmental information with available pest control methods to prevent unacceptable levels of pest damage by the most economical means and with the least possible hazard to people, property, and the environment. The IPM approach emphasizes a targeted use of pesticides that limits the possibility of human exposure (e.g., as opposed to wide-spread applications) and includes interventions based on the behavior of the target pest (e.g., preventing access to food or water). (One information source is the University of Minnesota's electronic textbook of Integrated Pest Management, available at: http://ipmworld.umn.edu/textbook.htm.)

h. Grantees collecting samples of settled dust from participant homes for environmental allergen analyses (e.g., cockroach, dust mite) will be required to use a standard dust sampling protocol, unless there is a strong justification to use an alternate protocol. The HUD protocol will be posted on the OHHLHC website at: http://www.hud.gov/offices/ lead/hhi/hhiresources.cfm. Grantees conducting these analyses will also be required to include quality control dust samples, provided by OHHLHC at no cost to the grantee, with the samples that are submitted for laboratory analyses. For the purpose of budgeting laboratory costs, assume that five percent of your total allergen dust samples would consist of QC samples.

i. Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) (e.g., 29 CFR part 1910 and/or 1926, as applicable), the EPA (e.g., 40 CFR parts 61, 260-282, 300-374, and/or 700-799, as applicable), the Department of Transportation (e.g., 49 CFR parts 171-177), and/or appropriate state or local regulatory agencies and applicable EPA, HUD, state, and local regulatory agency guidance. You must handle disposal of wastes from hazard control activities that contain lead-based paint, but are not classified as hazardous in accordance with state or local law or the HUD Guidelines for the Evaluation and Control of Lead-Based Hazards in Housing (HUD Guidelines). The HUD Guidelines may be downloaded from the HUD Web site at: www.hud.gov.

j. Worker Protection Procedures. You must comply with the procedures for worker protection established in the HUD Guidelines as well as the requirements of the OHSA, e.g., 29 CFR part 1910 and/or 1926, as applicable, or the state or local occupational safety and health regulations, whichever are more stringent.

k. Written Policies and Procedures. You must have written policies and procedures for all phases of interventions, including evaluation, development of specifications, financing, occupant relocation, independent project inspection, and clearance testing (e.g., for mold, lead, carbon monoxide or other hazards, as applicable). You and all your subcontractors, subrecipients, and their contractors must comply with these policies and procedures.

l. Continued Availability of Safe Housing to Low-Income Families. Units in which housing-based hazards have been controlled under this program shall be occupied by and/or continue to be available to low-income residents for not less than three years following the completion of intervention activities.

m. Data Collection and Provision. You must collect, maintain, and provide to HUD the data necessary to document the various approaches used to evaluate and control housing-based hazards, including evaluation and control methods, building conditions, medical and familial information (with confidentiality of individually-identifiable information ensured) in order to determine the effectiveness and relative cost of these methods.

n. Section 3 Employment Opportunities. Recipients of assistance in the Healthy Homes Demonstration Program must comply with Section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968, 12 U.S.C. 1701u (Economic Opportunities for Low- and Very Low-Income Persons in Connection with Assisted Projects) and the HUD regulations at 24 CFR part 135, including the reporting requirements of subpart E. Please see the General Section of the SuperNOFA for additional information about Section 3 requirements.

o. Certifications and Assurances. You must include the certifications and assurances listed in the General Section of this SuperNOFA with your application. A Certification of Consistency with the Consolidated Plan is not required for the Healthy Homes Demonstration NOFA.

p. Conducting Business in Accordance with HUD Core Values and Ethical Standards. If awarded assistance under the Healthy Homes Demonstration NOFA, you will be required, prior to entering into a grant agreement with HUD, to submit a copy of your code of conduct and describe the methods you will use to ensure that all officers, employees, and agents of your organization are aware of your code of conduct. See the General Section of the SuperNOFA for information about conducting business in accordance with HUD's core values and ethical standards.

4. DUNS Requirement

Refer to the General Section of the SuperNOFA for information regarding the DUNS requirement.

IV. Application and Submission Information Back to Top

If you are interested in applying for funding under this program, please review carefully the General Section of this Notice of Funding Availability and the following additional information.

A. Address To Request an Application Package

An application kit is not available for this NOFA. The information and material needed for an application is available from this program NOFA and the General Section of the SuperNOFA. Required forms are available online at: www.hud.gov. There are no materials available by mail for this NOFA.

B. Content and Form of Application Submission

Your application must include the following items and must be in concordance with the format and instructions described therein. The application should follow the outline provided in the Checklist to be found in Appendix E.

1. Provide a one-page transmittal letter, signed by the chief executive or other authorized official, that provides the title of your proposed project, the dollar amount requested, and identifies you and your partners in the application. Include the name, mailing address, and telephone number of the principal contact person. If you are a consortium of associates, subrecipients, partners, major subcontractors, joint venture participants, or others contributing resources to the project, similar information shall also be provided for each of these entities. You must also specify the primary entity.

2. An abstract describing the goals and objectives of your proposed program (2-page limit, single-spaced, 12-point standard font, one-inch margins) must be included in the proposal.

3. Checklist and Submission Table of Contents (see Appendix E of this NOFA; inclusion of the checklist is voluntary; however, it is recommended.).

4. Required Forms. All required forms are discussed in the General Section of the SuperNOFA and listed on the checklist in Appendix E. These forms are available at: www.grants.gov. They are also available as fillable Adobe Reader (PDF) or Word (DOC) formats from the HUD Web site at: www.hud.gov.

5. A narrative statement addressing the rating factors for award. The narrative statement must be numbered in accordance with each factor for award (Rating Factors 1 through 5). We recommend that you number all pages consecutively, including all appendices. The response to the rating factors must not exceed a total of 25 pages (single-spaced, 12-point font, one-inch margins). Key points to consider in preparing your application are provided in Appendix C of this NOFA. Any pages in excess of this limit will not be read.

6. Any attachments, appendices, references, or other relevant information that directly support the narrative may accompany it, but must not exceed twenty pages (12-point font with 1-inch margins) for your entire application. As discussed above, we recommend that you number pages consecutively. Any pages in excess of this limit will not be read. This material should be placed in Appendix 2 of your application. Specific criteria for the content of the appendices for the Healthy Homes Demonstration Program grant application are listed in the Checklist and Submission Table of Contents (see Appendix E of this NOFA.)

7. A detailed budget with supporting cost justification for all budget categories of your funding request, in accordance with Rating Factor 3, (2)(b). The budget and related materials should be placed in Appendix 3 of your application. This information will not be counted towards the page limits. In completing the budget forms and justification, you should address the following elements:

a. Direct Labor costs should include all full- and part-time staff required for the planning and implementation phases of the project. These costs should be based on FTE (full time equivalent) or hours per year (hours/year) (i.e., one FTE equals 2,080 hours/year)

b. You should budget for three trips to HUD Headquarters in Washington, DC, planning each trip for two people, assuming the first trip occurring shortly after grant award for a stay of two or three days, depending on your location, and the remaining trips having a stay of one or two days, depending on your location.

c. A separate budget proposal should be provided for any subrecipients receiving more than 10 percent of the total federal budget request.

d. You should be prepared to provide supporting documentation for salaries and prices of materials and equipment upon request.

e. Organizations that have a federally negotiated indirect rate should use that rate and the appropriate base. Other organizations must obtain a rate from their cognizant federal agency; otherwise the organization will be required to obtain a negotiated rate from HUD.

f. You should submit the negotiated rate agreements for fringe benefits and indirect costs, if applicable, as an attachment to the budget sheets.

8. The position descriptions and resumes, if available, of your project director and project manager and up to three additional key personnel (in accordance with Rating Factor 1), not to exceed three pages each (single-spaced, 12-point font with 1-inch margins). This information is to be included in Appendix 1 of your application and will not be counted toward the page limit.

C. Submission Dates and Times

You must submit an original and three copies of your application on or before July 13, 2004. Refer to the General Section of the SuperNOFA for additional submission requirements including acceptable submission methods, acceptable proof of delivery, and other information regarding application submission.

D. Intergovernmental Review

Not required for this submission.

E. Funding Restrictions

1. Administrative Costs. There is a 10 percent maximum allowance for administrative costs. Additional information about allowable administrative costs is provided in Appendix F of this NOFA.

2. Purchase of Real Property is not permitted.

3. Purchase or lease of equipment having a per unit cost in excess of $5,000 is not permitted, unless prior written approval is obtained from HUD.

4. Medical costs, except as specified above in Section III.C.2., are not permitted.

G. Other Submission Requirements

1. Application Submission Procedures

Submit an original and three copies of your application to: HUD Headquarters; Robert C. Weaver Federal Building; 451 Seventh Street, SW., Room P3206; Washington, DC 20410-3000; ATTN: Healthy Homes Demonstration Program.

See the General Section of this SuperNOFA for specific procedures concerning the form of application submission (e.g., mailed applications, express mail, or overnight delivery).

V. Application Review Information Back to Top

A. Criteria

1. Rating and Ranking. Applications will be reviewed by an Application Review Panel (ARP) which will assign each application a numerical score based on the rating factors presented below. The ARP chairperson initially selects and provides at least one application to panel members to score during a calibration round to ensure that all panel members are consistent in their interpretation of the rating factors. When the calibration round is completed, each application is reviewed and scored by at least two panel members who will assign a score based on the rating factors presented in section V.A.2 below. Each factor is weighted as indicated by the number of points that are attainable for it. An average score is then computed for each application. The ARP chair may call upon an advisor to the ARP to review and comment on a proposal; however, the advisor does not score the application. The ARP holds a final meeting to identify the top-ranking applications to be recommended for funding. Awards will be made separately in rank order within the limits of funding availability. The maximum score that can be assigned to an application is 102 points. Applicants should be certain that these factors are adequately addressed in the project description and accompanying materials.

a. Five rating factors:

Rating Factor 1: Capacity of the Applicant and Relevant Organizational xperience (20 points);

Rating Factor 2: Need/Extent of the Problem (15 points);

Rating Factor 3: Soundness of Approach (40 points);

Rating Factor 4: Leveraging Resources (10 points);

Rating Factor 5: Achieving Results and Program Evaluation (15 points);

RC/EZ/EC Bonus Points (2 points);

Total: 102 points.

Applicants are eligible to receive two bonus points for projects located within federally designated Renewable Communities (RC)/Employment Zones (EZ)/Enterprise Communities (EC) (RC/EZ/ECs) and which will serve the residents of these communities (see the General Section of the SuperNOFA).

2. Rating Factors. The factors for rating and ranking applicants, and maximum points for each factor, are provided below.

a. Rating Factor 1: Capacity of the Applicant and Relevant Organizational Experience (20 Points)

This factor addresses your organizational capacity necessary to successfully implement your proposed activities in a timely manner. The rating of you or your staff includes any faith-based or other community-based organizations, sub-contractors, consultants, subrecipients, and members of consortia that are firmly committed to your project. Applicants that either are or propose to partner, fund, or sub-contract with grassroots organizations, including faith-based or other community-based nonprofits, in conducting their work programs will receive higher rating points as specified in the General Section of the SuperNOFA. In rating this factor, HUD will consider the four items listed below.

(1) Capacity and Qualifications of Principal Investigator and Key Personnel. Your recent, relevant, and successful demonstrated experience in undertaking eligible program activities. You must describe the knowledge and experience of the proposed overall project director and day-to-day project manager in planning and managing large and complex interdisciplinary programs, especially those involving housing, public health, or environmental programs. In your narrative response for this factor, you should include information on your project staff, their experience with housing and health programs, percentage commitment to the project, and position titles. Resumes of up to three pages each and position descriptions for up to three key personnel in addition to the project director and project manager, and a clearly delineated organizational chart for the Healthy Homes project you propose, must be included in Appendix 1 of your application. Position descriptions and copies of job announcements (including salary range) should be included for any key positions that are currently vacant or contingent upon an award. Indicate the name of the position, the percentage of time that proposed staff will devote to your project and any salary costs to be paid by funds from this program. Successful applicants must hire within 120 days of award all key staff positions identified in the proposal as vacant or required in the award agreement. HUD reserves the right to terminate grant awards made to applicants that fail to timely hire (within 120 days of award) such staff. Include descriptions of the experience and qualifications of subcontractors and consultants. You may find it useful to include a table indicating the name, position and percentage contribution of staff members, specifying organizational affiliation.

(2) Qualifications of Applicant and Partner Organizations. To carry out the proposed activities as evidenced by experience, academic background, training, and/or relevant publications of project staff. Document whether you have sufficient personnel, or will be able to quickly retain qualified experts or professionals to begin your proposed project immediately, and to perform your proposed activities in a timely and effective fashion. Describe how principal components of your organization will participate in, or support, your project and how you propose to coordinate with your partners. You should thoroughly describe capacity, as demonstrated by experience in initiating and implementing related environmental, health, or housing projects.

(3) Past performance of the organization. Applicant or partners in another Healthy Homes or Lead Hazard Control grant, another grant related to environmental health and safety issues, or other experience in a similar program. Provide details about the nature of the project, the funding agency, and your performance, relative to performance measures and the achievement of desired housing and health related outcomes.

(4) Performance as a Healthy Homes Grantee. If your organization is an existing Healthy Homes grantee, provide a description of the progress and outcomes achieved in that grant. If you received previous Healthy Homes Demonstration funding, this experience will be evaluated in terms of cumulative progress and achievements under the previous grant.

Please complete the Factor 1 table, Capacity of the Applicant and Relevant Organizational Experience, in Appendix B to support narrative information submitted.

b. Rating Factor 2: Need/Extent of the Problem (15 Points)

This factor addresses the extent to which there is a need for your proposed project activities to address documented problems related to healthy homes issues and housing-related hazards in your target area(s) and target group(s).

(1) Specifically identify a target area for your proposed activities. Document a critical level of need for your proposed activities in this target area. You should pay specific attention to documenting the need as it applies to your target area(s), and provide statistics for this area, if available, rather than general statistics or information pertinent to a larger geographic area. If your target area comprises a Renewal Community/Enterprise Community/Empowerment Zone, indicate the location of this area in the narrative for this rating factor. (2 bonus points are awarded if your target area is located in a Renewal Zone/Enterprise Community/Empowerment Zone.)

(2) Your documentation should summarize available data linking housing-based hazards to disease or injuries to children in your target area(s), if available. Examples of data that might be used to demonstrate need include:

(a) Economic and demographic data relevant to your target area(s), including poverty and unemployment rates;

(b) Rates of childhood illnesses (e.g., asthma, allergies, hypertension, elevated blood lead levels) or injuries (e.g., falls, burns) among children residing in your target areas that could be caused or exacerbated by exposure to conditions in the home environment; and

(3) For the areas targeted for your project activities, provide data available in your jurisdiction's currently approved Consolidated Plan and the Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice (AI) or Indian Housing Plan or derived from current census data or from other sources. Provide and reference data that address the following:

(a) The age and condition of housing;

(b) The number and percentage of low- and very low-income families with incomes less than 50 percent and 80 percent of the median income, respectively, as determined by HUD, for the area, with adjustments for smaller and larger families. Statistics that describe low- and very-low income families are available at: www.huduser.org/datasets/il/fmr00/sect82.html. Additional census statistics are available at: www.census.gov/hhes/www/income00.html, www.census.gov/hhes/income/income00/statemhi.html, and www.huduser.org/datasets/il/fmr00/index.html;

(c) To the extent that statistics and other data contained in your community's Consolidated Plan or AI support the extent of the problem, you should include references to the Consolidated Plan or AI in your response; and

(d) Data documenting targeted groups that are traditionally underserved or have special needs. For a maximum score in this rating factor, data provided should specifically represent the target area. If the data presented in your response do not specifically represent your target area, you should discuss why the target areas are being proposed. If your application addresses needs that are in the Consolidated Plan or AI, you will receive more points than applicants that do not relate their project to a previously identified need.

Complete the Factor 2 table, Need/Extent of Problem, in Appendix B to support narrative information (and section A if lead poisoning risk is part of demonstrated need).

c. Rating Factor 3: Soundness of Approach (40 Points)

This factor addresses the quality and cost-effectiveness of your proposed work plan. You should present detailed information on the proposed approach for addressing housing-based hazards and describe how proposed activities would help HUD achieve its goals for this program area. For you to receive maximum points for this factor, there must be a direct relationship between the proposed activities, documented and demonstrated community needs, and the purpose of the project. Your application will be evaluated according to the comprehensiveness of addressing activities that are applicable to your project. The response to this factor should include details about your technical approach and project activities. HUD is looking for a clear statement of activities, timeline for completing the work and expected deliverables, including any quantitative deliverables.

(1) Approach for Implementing the Project (25 points).

(a) Technical Approach. Describe your overall technical approach for strategizing and implementing your proposed project. Your narrative response to this sub-factor will be used to assess how well your proposed project will be executed. In this factor, describe the methods, schedule, milestones, and quality assurance activities that will be carried out to identify and control housing-based hazards and to achieve the desired project outcomes. Include summary information about the estimated numbers of clients to be contacted, clients enrolled, units to be assessed, units to receive interventions, individuals to be trained and individuals to be reached through education/outreach activities.

(b) Project Activities. Your project description must include a discussion of specific planned project activities that address one or more of the following activities.

(i) Describe in detail how you will identify, select, prioritize, and enroll units of eligible housing in which you will undertake housing-based hazard interventions, how you will integrate safe work practices into housing maintenance, repair, and improvements, and then target such units to low-income families with young children. Describe impediments that you anticipate for recruitment, measures you will perform to sustain recruitment, and the staff responsible for both monitoring recruitment status and implementing the measures identified to sustain recruitment. Describe any anticipated impact of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPPA) on your recruitment strategy.

(ii) Describe any assessment tools you would employ to establish baseline data. These tools include questionnaires, visual assessment protocols and environmental sampling and analysis. Include a description of the Informed Consent/Disclosure process you intend to follow for obtaining Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval, if necessary. In particular, describe how you will provide informed consent (e.g., from the subjects, and their parents and guardians, as applicable) to help ensure their understanding of, and consent to, the elements of informed consent, such as the purposes, benefits and risks of the research activities. Describe how this information will be provided and how the consent will be collected. For example, describe the use of “plain language” forms, flyers, and verbal scripts, and discuss your plans to work with persons with limited English proficiency and their families, and with families including persons with disabilities.

(iii) Describe your process for evaluating units of eligible housing in which you will undertake housing-based hazard interventions. Provide the estimated total number of owner-occupied and/or rental units in which you will perform assessments and conduct interventions.

(iv) Describe any specialized testing, if applicable, or visual assessment that you will conduct during assessment of units and provide a reference to source(s) of the protocol(s). Provide a description of protocols or include protocols in an appendix of your application.

(v) Discuss efforts to incorporate cost-effective methods to address multiple environmental health and safety hazards, and describe the specific interventions you will utilize to control housing-based hazards before children are affected; and/or to control these hazards in units where children have already been treated for illnesses or injuries associated with housing-based hazards (e.g., burns, lead poisoning, asthma). Provide an estimate of the cost of each intervention (material costs and labor costs associated with installation) and an estimate of costs projected per unit. Describe your management processes to be used to ensure the cost-effectiveness of the housing interventions.

(vi) Describe the process to be followed for referring children for medical case management and indicate organizations that will be involved in this process.

(vii) Describe your process for the development of work specifications for the selected interventions.

(viii) Discuss your process to select and obtain contractors for conducting interventions in selected units and provide details about the competitive bidding process, if applicable.

(ix) Describe your plan for the relocation of occupants of units selected for intervention, if temporary relocation is necessary. Describe criteria that will determine the need for relocation and identify staff that will make relocation decisions. Address the use of safe houses and other housing arrangements, storage of household goods, stipends, incentives, etc., and the source of funding for relocation.

(x) Describe your plan for ensuring right of return and/or first referral for occupants of units selected for intervention who have had to move for intervention to occur.

(xi) Describe how you will affirmatively further fair housing, which would include, but not be limited to: Affirmative marketing of the program to those least likely to apply based on race, color, sex, familial status, national origin, religion, disability, especially when persons in these demographic groups are generally not served by the nonprofit or faith-based applicant or partner organizations; providing materials in alternative formats for persons with disabilities; providing materials in languages other than English for individuals with limited English proficiency and their families; assuring long-term residency by families currently living in the community; and assuring that priority for treated units go to those who need the features (treatment) of the unit.

(xii) Describe the financing strategy, including eligibility requirements, terms, conditions, and amounts available, to be employed in conducting housing-based hazards activities. You must discuss the way funds will be administered (e.g., use of grants, deferred loans, forgivable loans, other resources, private sector financing, etc.) as well as the agency that will administer the process.

(xiii) Describe your proposed methods for community and/or targeted education and training. These should include community awareness, education, training, and outreach programs that support your work plan and are culturally sensitive and targeted appropriately. Provide information about specific educational/outreach activities with quantitative data (number of individuals to be reached, etc.) and a description of the intended audience. Describe proposed activities to deliver culturally appropriate educational materials and methods to the target population and communities. Describe efforts to understand and incorporate culturally sensitive approaches to assessment and interventions.

(xiv) Provide detailed information about training staff or other organizations to provide the knowledge and skills required to address Healthy Homes issues that are essential for successfully implementing your project (e.g., education, assessments and interventions). Include an outline of training curricula, a description of qualifications of trainers, and selection of individuals or groups who will receive the training. Describe how Healthy Homes training programs will be expanded to include public housing agencies or Tribally Designated Housing Entities and other potential collaborators, such as faith-based or other community-based organizations.

(xv) Describe your proposed involvement of neighborhood, or faith-based and other community-based organizations in the proposed activities. These activities may include outreach, community education, marketing, inspection, and housing evaluations and interventions.

(xvi) Describe your proposed methods to reach high-risk groups and communities, vulnerable populations and persons traditionally underserved.

(xvii) Indicate if, and describe how, you will address any of HUD's departmental policy priorities (see General Section of the SuperNOFA for a fuller explanation of HUD's policy priorities). You will receive points under Rating Factor 3 for each of the applicable FY 2004 policy priorities that are adequately addressed in your application to a maximum of five points (see the General Section of this NOFA). Policy priorities that are applicable to the Healthy Homes Demonstration NOFA are: (1) Improving our Nation's Communities (focus on distressed communities; (2) Providing Full and Equal Access to GrassRoots Faith-based or other Community-based Organizations in HUD Program Implementation); (3) Participation of Minority-Serving Institutions in HUD Programs; and (4) Removal of Regulatory Barriers to Affordable Housing. Each policy priority is worth one point, except for policy priority (4), Removal of Regulatory Barriers to Affordable Housing, which is worth up to 2 points. Applicants that include work activities that specifically address one or more applicable policy priorities will receive higher rating scores than applicants that do not address these HUD priorities, up to a maximum of 5 points

(2) Approach for Managing the Project. (12 points). Describe your project goals and objectives and the strategy you will use in managing and executing the project. You should provide information on the general approach and overall plan employed.

(a) Project Management Plan (10 points). Include a management plan that:

(i) Incorporates appropriate performance goals;

(ii) Lists the project objectives, major tasks and activities. All specific activities necessary to complete the proposed project must be included in the task listing;

(iii) Provides a schedule for the assignment, tracking and completion of major tasks and activities, and a timeframe for delivery;

(iv) Ensures that quality assurance activities and corrective actions are managed;

(v) Designates resources and identifies responsible entities (project staff/ partner organizations);

(vi) Describes the strategy and methods for coordination and communication between partners; and

(vii) Describes the management processes to manage costs and ensure that cost-effective housing interventions will be implemented.

(b) Budget Justification (2 points). Your proposed budget will be evaluated for the extent to which it is reasonable, clearly justified, and consistent with the project management plan and intended use of program funds. HUD is not required to approve or fund all proposed activities. Your detailed budget should be submitted using Form HUD-CBW. An electronic copy of this and other budgetary forms are available at: www.grants.gov. You must thoroughly document and justify all budget categories and costs (form HUD-424-CB) and all major tasks for yourself, subrecipients, partners, major subcontractors, joint venture participants, or others contributing resources to the project. Include a 2-page narrative that describes clearly and in detail your budgeted costs for each required program element (major task) included in your overall plan. (You may include this narrative along with the budget forms; it will not count toward the 25-page limit of the narrative.)

(3) Economic Opportunity (3 points). To the greatest extent feasible, your project should promote job training, employment, and other economic opportunities for low-income and minority residents and businesses which are owned by, and/or employ, low-income and minority residents as defined in 24 CFR 135.5. You should:

(a) Describe how you or your partners will comply with Section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968 (12 U.S.C. 1701u) and HUD's implementing rules at 24 CFR part 135. Describe how you will accomplish this requirement by:

(i) providing training and employment opportunities for low- and very low-income persons living within the grantee's jurisdiction, and by

(ii) providing business opportunities to businesses owned by low- and very low-income persons living within the targeted jurisdiction; information about Section 3 requirements is available by searching HUD's website, www.hud.gov;

(b) Describe how your proposed project will provide opportunities for self-sufficiency, particularly for persons enrolled in welfare-to-work programs, or providing educational and job training opportunities; and

(c) Describe the extent to which your proposed activities will occur in an Empowerment Zone or Enterprise Community (EZ/EC), Urban Enhanced Enterprise Community (EEC), or Renewal Community (RC) as defined in the General Section of the SuperNOFA. (You may identify the RC/EC/EZ in Rating Factor 2, Need/Extent of the Problem.)

d. Rating Factor 4: Leveraging Resources (10 Points)

This factor addresses your ability to secure other community resources (e.g., financing, supplies, or services) that can be combined with HUD's resources to achieve project purposes. These community resources may be contributions from organizations such as the applicant, partners, or other organizations not directly involved in the project.

(1) In evaluating this factor, HUD will consider the extent to which you have developed partnerships to secure additional resources to increase the effectiveness of your proposed project. Describe how other organizations will participate in or support your project. Resources may include funding or in-kind contributions (e.g., labor, fringe benefits, services, supplies, or equipment) budgeted for your proposed project. Resources may be provided by state and local governmental entities, public or private organizations, or other partners.

(2) Each source of contributions (financial or in-kind) must be supported by a letter of commitment from the contributing entity, whether the applicant, a partner organization, or a public or private source. The letter must describe the contributed resource(s) that will be used in your project and the dollar value of each contribution. Staff in-kind contributions should be given a market-based monetary value. If you fail to provide letters of commitment with specific details, including the amount of the actual contributions, you will not get rating points for this factor. Each letter of commitment, memorandum of understanding, or agreement to participate shall include the organization's name and the proposed level of commitment and responsibilities as they relate to the proposed project. The commitment must be signed by an official legally able to make commitments on behalf of the organization. Letters of support (letters that indicate support, but do not specify a monetary commitment to the project) will not be considered in the scoring of Rating Factor 4. Include information to address the following elements.

(a) The extent to which you have coordinated your activities with other known organizations that are not directly participating in your proposed work activities, but with which you share common goals and objectives.

(i) Describe your plan for integrating and coordinating housing-based hazard interventions with other housing-related activities (e.g., rehabilitation, weatherization, correction of code violations, and other similar work).

(ii) Describe your plans to generate and use public subsidies or other resources, such as revolving loan funds, to finance future interventions to prevent and control housing-based hazards, particularly in low- and very low-income housing.

(b) The extent to which your project exhibits the potential to be financially self-sustaining by decreasing dependence on federal funding and relying more on state, local and private funding to continue healthy homes activities after the grant period is completed.

Applicants are to complete the Factor 4 table, Leveraging Resources, in Appendix B to support narrative information submitted.

e. Rating Factor 5: Achieving Results and Program Evaluation (15 Points)

This rating factor reflects HUD's goal to embrace high standards of ethics, management and accountability. HUD is committed to ensuring that applicants keep promises made in their applications and assess their performance to ensure that performance goals are met. Achieving results means you, the applicant, have clearly identified the benefits or outcomes of your program. Outcomes are ultimate goals. Benchmarks or outputs are interim activities or products that lead to the ultimate achievement of your goals.

Program evaluation requires that you identify program outcomes, interim benchmarks, and performance indicators that will allow you to measure your performance. Performance indicators should be objectively quantifiable and measure actual achievements against anticipated achievements. Your Evaluation Plan should identify what you are going to measure, how you are going to measure it, and the steps you have in place to make adjustments to your work plan if performance targets are not met within established time frames.

In your response to this rating factor, you are to discuss the performance goals for your project, and identify specific outcome measures. Identify and discuss the specific methods you will use to measure progress towards your goals, track and report results of assessments and interventions, and evaluate the effectiveness of interventions; identify important project milestones (e.g., the end of specific phases in a multi-phased project) and deliverables specific to your project timeline, and identify milestones that are critical to achieving project objectives (e.g., developing questionnaires or protocols, hiring staff, recruitment of participants, and Institutional Review Board approval, if applicable); identify benchmarks such as number of units that received intervention, percent of interventions that occurred in high-risk communities, etc. that you will use to track the progress of your project.

You should also identify how your project will be held accountable for meeting project goals, objectives, and the actions undertaken in implementing the grant program. You should provide assurances that work plans and performance measures developed for your project will be achieved in a timely and cost-effective manner.

You must complete and return the Form HUD-96010, Logic Model, showing your proposed project long-term, mid-term, short-term, and final results, and how they support HUD's departmental goals and objectives. Information about developing a Logic Model is available at: www.hud.gov.

In evaluating Rating Factor 5, HUD will consider how you have described the benefits and outcome measures of your program.

B. Reviews and Selection Process

Information on the review and selection process is provided in the General Section of the SuperNOFA. The General Section also provides the procedures for correcting deficient applications.

C. Anticipated Announcement and Award Dates

The anticipated award date for this NOFA is September 30, 2004.

VI. Award Administration Information Back to Top

A. Award Notices

1. Applicants Selected for Award

Successful Applicants will receive a letter from the Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control Grant Officer. The letter will provide additional details regarding the effective start date of the grant and any additional data and information to be submitted to execute a grant agreement. This letter is not an authorization to begin work or incur costs under the grant.

HUD may require that all the grantees participate in negotiations to determine the specific terms of the grant agreement and budget. In cases where HUD cannot successfully conclude negotiations with a selected applicant or a selected applicant fails to provide HUD with requested information, an award will not be made to that applicant. In this instance, HUD may offer an award, and proceed with negotiations with the next highest-ranking applicant. If you accept the terms and conditions of the grant, you must return your signed grant agreement by the date specified during negotiation.

After receiving the letter, additional instructions on how to have the grant account entered into HUD's Line of Credit Control System (LOCCS) payment system will be provided. Other forms and program requirements will also be provided.

In accordance with OMB Circular A-133 (Audits of States, Local Governments and Non-Profit Organizations), grantees will have to submit their completed audit-reporting package along with the Data Collection Form (SF-SAC) to the Single Audit Clearinghouse. The address can be obtained from their website. The SF-SAC can be downloaded at: http://harvester.census.gov/sac/.

2. Debriefing

The General Section of the SuperNOFA provides the procedures for applicants to request a debriefing.

B. Administrative and National Policy Requirements

Refer to the General Section of the SuperNOFA for additional details regarding the Administrative and National Policy Requirements applicable to HUD Programs.

1. Environmental Requirements

Activities assisted under this program are subject to HUD environmental review to the extent required under 24 CFR part 50. An award under the Healthy Homes Initiative does not constitute approval of specific sites where activities may be carried out. Following award execution, HUD will perform environmental reviews for activities to be carried out on properties proposed by your organization. You must comply with HUD's regulations in 24 CFR 50.3(h) in carrying out responsibilities regarding environmental review. You may not rehabilitate, convert, repair or construct a property, or commit or expend program funds or non-HUD funds for these program activities for any eligible property, until you receive written notification from the appropriate HUD official that HUD has completed its environmental review and the property has been approved. The results of environmental reviews may require that proposed activities be modified or proposed sites rejected. Recipients of a grant under this NOFA will be given guidance in these responsibilities.

2. Coastal Barrier Resources Act

Pursuant to the Coastal Barrier Resources Act (16 U.S.C. 3501), funds may not be used for properties located in the Coastal Barrier Resources System.

3. Flood Disaster Protection Act

Under the Flood Disaster Protection Act of 1973 (42 U.S.C. 4001-4128), funds may not be used for construction, reconstruction, repair or improvement of a building or mobile home which is located in an area identified by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) as having special flood hazards unless:

a. The community in which the area is situated is participating in the National Flood Insurance Program in accordance with the applicable regulations (44 CFR parts 59-79), or less than a year has passed since FEMA notification regarding these hazards; and

b. Where the community is participating in the National Flood Insurance Program, flood insurance on the property is obtained in accordance with section 102(a) of the Flood Disaster Protection Act (42 U.S.C. 4012a(a)). You are responsible for assuring that flood insurance is obtained and maintained for the appropriate amount and term.

4. National Historic Preservation Act

The National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470) (NHPA) and the regulations at 36 CFR part 800 apply to the mold intervention and related hazard control activities that are undertaken pursuant to this program. HUD and the Advisory Council for Historic Preservation have developed an optional Model Agreement for use by grantees and State Historic Preservation Officers in carrying out any lead hazard control activities under this program. A Model Agreement (Prototype Programmatic Agreement) is available at the Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control's website, linked to www.hud.gov.

5. Relocation

Any person (including individuals, partnerships, corporations, or associations) who moves from real property or moves personal property from real property directly (1) because of a written notice to acquire real property, in whole or in part, or (2) because of the acquisition of the real property, in whole or in part, for a HUD-assisted activity, is covered by federal relocation statutes and regulations. Specifically, this type of move is covered by the acquisition policies and procedures and the relocation requirements of the Uniform Relocation Assistance and Real Property Acquisition Policies Act of 1970 URA, as amended, and the implementing governmentwide regulation at 49 CFR part 24. The relocation requirements of the URA and the governmentwide regulations cover any person who moves permanently from real property or moves personal property from real property directly because of acquisition, rehabilitation or demolition for an activity undertaken with HUD assistance. See Section V (G) of the General Section of the SuperNOFA for additional information about relocation.

6. Davis-Bacon Act

The Davis-Bacon Act does not apply to this program. However, if program funds are used in conjunction with other federal programs in which Davis-Bacon prevailing wage rates apply, then Davis-Bacon provisions would apply to the extent required under the other federal programs.

C. Reporting

Successful applicants will be required to submit quarterly and final program and financial reports according the requirements of the Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control. Specific guidance and additional details will be provided to successful applicants.

The following items are a part of OHHLHC” reporting requirements.

1. Final Work Plan and Budget are due prior to the effective start of the grant.

2. Quality Assurance Plan (QAP). Successful Healthy Homes Demonstration applicants that will be collecting housing, demographic or environmental data in a formalized manner for use in assessing accomplishments of the approaches being demonstrated under the grant will be required to submit a Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) to HUD prior to initiating work under the grant. This is a streamlined version of the format used by some other federal agencies, and is intended to help ensure the accuracy and validity of the data that you will collect under the grant. Your proposed project activities should include developing this QAP. The QAP will be submitted to HUD as a part of your work plan.

3. Progress reports are due on a quarterly basis.

4. A final report is due at the end of the grant. Specific information on all reporting requirements will be provided to successful applicants.

5. Racial and Ethnic Beneficiary Data. HUD does not require grantees to collect and report racial and ethnic beneficiary data for this program. If, however, racial and ethic data are collected and reported as part of a study funded under this program NOFA, you must use the Office of Management and Budget's Standards for the Collection of Racial and Ethnic Data as presented on Form HUD-27061, Racial and Ethnic Data Reporting Form (and instructions for its use), found on www.grants.gov.

VII. Agency Contacts Back to Top

For technical or programmatic questions, you may contact by writing: Emily Williams, Acting Director; Healthy Homes Division; U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control; 451 Seventh Street, SW., Room P3206; Washington, DC 20410-3000; or by telephone by calling (336) 547-4002, extension 2067 (this is not a toll-free number). For administrative questions, you may contact Curtissa L. Coleman, Grants Officer, at the address above or by telephone at: (202) 755-1785, extension 119 (this is not a toll-free number). If you are hearing or speech-impaired, you may reach the above telephone numbers via TTY by calling the toll-free Federal Information Relay Service at 800-877-8339.

VIII. Other Information Back to Top

1. The provisions of the HUD Reform Act of 1989 that apply to this NOFA are discussed in the General Section. Refer to the General Section of the SuperNOFA for details regarding other information on submitting a complete application that meets HUD requirements. For additional general, technical, and grant program information pertaining to the Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control, visit: http://www.hud.gov/healthyhomes.

2. The information collection requirements contained in this document have been approved by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501-3520) and assigned OMB control number 2539-0015. In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act, HUD may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to, a collection of information unless the collection displays a currently valid OMB control number. Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 96 hours per annum per respondent for the application and grant administration. This includes the time for collecting, reviewing, and reporting the data for the application, quarterly reports, and final report. The information will be used for grantee selection and monitoring the administration of funds. Response to this request for information is required in order to receive the benefits to be derived.

3. The appendices to this NOFA follow.

Appendix A: Housing-Related Health and Injury Hazards Back to Top

The following briefly describes the housing-associated health and injury hazards HUD considers key targets for intervention. More information about housing-associated health and injury hazards is available at the Healthy Homes Initiative Web site at: www.hud.gov.

Allergens and asthma: Experts estimate that 14 million Americans have asthma, with an associated annual cost of $6.2 billion. Asthma is now recognized as the leading cause of school and work absences, emergency room visits, and hospitalizations. For sensitized children, exposure to antigens from dust mites, certain pets, and cockroaches has been associated with more severe asthma. There is a preponderance of evidence showing a dose-response relationship between exposure and prevalence of asthma and allergies; some evidence also indicates that exposure to antigens early in life may predispose or hasten the onset of allergies and asthma. Dust mites have been identified as the largest trigger for asthma and allergies. Cockroach allergens appear to be excessive in 30-50 percent of inner-city housing and affect 5-15 percent of the population, whereas dust mites appear to be the dominant allergen in other environments.

Interventions known to have beneficial effects include the installation of impervious mattress and pillow covers, which can reduce allergen exposure by 90 percent. Other dust mite control measures include dehumidification, laundering bedding, and removal of carpets and other dust sinks. Cleaning carpets with tannic acid solution has also been demonstrated to greatly reduce dust mites. Asthma prevention program costs have been estimated at about $500 per unit, which includes about $150 for educational interventions. Additional information is available in HUD's research topic paper, “Healthy Homes Issues: Asthma” available at the Resources, Technical Resources link of HUD's Healthy Homes Initiative website, linked to HUD's Web site, www.hud.gov.

Asbestos: Asbestos is a mineral fiber that has been used commonly in a variety of building construction materials and household products for insulation and as a fire-retardant. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) have banned most asbestos products. Manufacturers have also voluntarily limited uses of asbestos. Today, asbestos is most commonly found in older homes, in pipe and furnace insulation materials, asbestos shingles, millboard, textured paints and other coating materials, and floor tiles. Elevated concentrations of airborne asbestos can occur when asbestos-containing materials (ACMs) are disturbed by cutting, sanding, or other remodeling activities. Improper attempts to remove these materials can release asbestos fibers into the air in homes, increasing asbestos levels and endangering the people living in those homes. The most dangerous asbestos fibers are too small to be visible. After they are inhaled, they can remain and accumulate in the lungs. Asbestos can cause lung cancer, mesothelioma (a cancer of the chest and abdominal linings), and asbestosis (irreversible lung scarring that can be fatal). Most people with an asbestos-related disease were exposed to elevated concentrations on the job; some developed disease from exposure to clothing and equipment brought home from job sites. As with radon, dose-response extrapolations suggest that lower level exposures, as may occur when asbestos-containing building materials deteriorate or are disturbed, may also cause cancer.

Intact asbestos-containing materials are not a hazard; they should be monitored for damage or deterioration and isolated if possible. Repair of damaged or deteriorating ACMs usually involves either sealing (encapsulation) or covering (enclosure) it. Repair is usually cheaper than removal, but it may make later removal of asbestos more difficult and costly. Only a professional who is trained and certified to handle asbestos safely should do repairs. Repairs can cost from a few hundred to a few thousand dollars and removal can be more expensive.

Combustion products of heating and cooking appliances: Burning of oil, natural gas, kerosene, and wood for heating or cooking purposes can release a variety of combustion products of health concern. Depending upon the fuel, these may include carbon monoxide (a chemical asphyxiate), oxides of nitrogen (respiratory irritants), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (e.g., the carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene), and airborne particulate matter (respiratory irritants). Carbon monoxide, an odorless gas, can be fatal. Nitrogen dioxide can damage the respiratory tract, and sulfur dioxide can irritate the eyes, nose and respiratory tract. Smoke and other particulates irritate the eyes, nose and throat, and can cause lung cancer.

Improper venting and poor maintenance of heating systems and cooking appliances can dramatically increase exposure to combustion products. Experts recommend having combustion heating systems inspected by a trained professional every year to identify blocked openings to flues and chimneys, cracked or disconnected flue pipes, dirty filters, rust or cracks in heat exchangers, soot or creosote build-up, and exhaust or gas odors. Installing a carbon monoxide detector is also recommended; however, such a detector will not detect other combustion by-products.

Insect and rodent pests: The observed association between exposure to cockroach antigen and asthma severity has already been noted above. In addition, cockroaches may act as vehicles to contaminate environmental surfaces with certain pathogenic organisms. Rodents can transmit a number of communicable diseases to humans, either through bites, arthropod vectors, or exposure to aerosolized excreta. In addition, humans can become sensitized to proteins in rodent urine, dander, and saliva. Such sensitization may contribute to asthma severity among children. Insect and rodent infestation is frequently associated with substandard housing that makes it difficult to eliminate. Treatment of rodent and insect infestations often includes the use of toxic pesticides that may present hazards to occupants (see below). Integrated pest management (IPM) for rodents and cockroaches, which reduces the use of pesticides, is estimated to cost approximately $150 per unit. IPM control measures include sealing holes and cracks, removing food sources and the use of traps. In technical terms, IPM is the coordinated use of pest and environmental information with available pest control methods to prevent unacceptable levels of pest damage by the most economical means and with the least possible hazard to people, property, and the environment. (One information source is the University of Minnesota's electronic textbook of Integrated Pest Management, available at: http://ipmworld.umn.edu/textbook.htm.)

Lead: Exposure to lead, especially from deteriorating lead-based paint, remains one of the most important and best studied of the household environmental hazards to children. Although blood lead levels have fallen nationally, a large reservoir of lead remains in housing. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has found, for example, for children under age 6, that about 434,000 have elevated blood lead levels. Overall, the prevalence rate among all children under six years of age is 4.4 percent. Among low-income children living in older housing where lead-based paint is most prevalent, the rate climbs to 16 percent; and for African-American children living in such housing, it reaches 21 percent.

The National Survey of Lead and Allergens in Housing (2000) estimates that 38 million dwellings have some lead-based paint, and that 24 million have significant lead-based paint hazards. Of those, about 4.8 million have young children and of those, about 1.2 million have household incomes under $30,000 per year. Costs for Lead Hazard Control can range anywhere from $500 to $15,000 per unit. Corrective measures include paint stabilization, enclosure and removal of certain building components coated with lead paint, and cleanup and “clearance testing,” which ensures the unit is safe for young children.

Mold and moisture: An analysis of several pulmonary disease studies estimates that 25 percent of airways disease, and 60 percent of interstitial lung disease may be associated with moisture in the home or work environment. Moisture is a precursor to the growth of mold and other biological agents, which is also associated with respiratory symptoms. An investigation of a cluster of pulmonary hemosiderosis (PH) cases in infants showed PH was associated with a history of recent water damage to homes and with levels of the mold Stachybotrys atra (SA) in air and in cultured surface samples. Associations between exposure to SA and “sick building” symptoms in adults have also been observed. Other related toxigenic fungi have been found in association with SA-associated illness and could play a role. For sensitive individuals, exposure to a wide variety of common molds may also aggravate asthma. Addressing mold problems in housing requires coordination among the medical, public health, microbiological, housing, and building science communities. Additional information is available in HUD's research topic paper, “Healthy Homes Issues: Mold” available at the Resources, Technical Resources link of HUD's Healthy Homes Initiative Web site, linked to HUD's Web site, www.hud.gov.

The cost of mold/moisture-related intervention work (e.g., IPM, clean and tune furnace, remove debris, vent clothes dryer, cover dirt floor with impermeable vapor barrier) is a few hundred dollars, unless major modification of the ventilation system is needed. For example, in Cleveland, mold interventions, including repairs to ventilation systems and basement flooring, in the most heavily contaminated homes range from $500-$5,000, with some costs also being dedicated to lead hazard control simultaneously through its Lead+Asthma program.

Pesticide residues: According to the EPA, 75 percent of U.S. households used at least one pesticide product indoors during the past year. Products used most often are insecticides and disinfectants. Another study suggests that 80 percent of most people's exposure to pesticides occurs indoors and that measurable levels of up to a dozen pesticides have been found in the air inside homes. The amount of pesticides found in homes appears to be greater than can be explained by recent pesticide use in those households; other possible sources include contaminated soil or dust that migrates in from outside, stored pesticide containers, and household surfaces that collect and then release the pesticides. Pesticides used in and around the home include products to control insects (insecticides), termites (termiticides), rodents (rodenticides), molds and fungi (fungicides), and microbes (disinfectants). In 1990, the American Association of Poison Control Centers reported that some 79,000 children were involved in common household pesticide poisonings or exposures. In households with children under five years of age, almost half stored at least one pesticide product within the reach of children. Data are available on hazard evaluation methods and remediation effectiveness regarding pesticide residues in the home environment.

Radon progeny: The National Academy of Sciences estimates that approximately 15,000 cases of lung cancer per year are related to radon exposure. Epidemiological studies of miners exposed to high levels of radon in inhaled air have defined the dose response relation for radon-induced lung cancer at high exposure levels. Extrapolation of this data has been used to estimate the excess risk of lung cancer attributable to exposure to radon gas at the lower levels found in homes. These estimates indicate that radon gas is an important cause of lung cancer deaths in the U.S. Excessive exposures are typically related to home ventilation, structural integrity, and location.

Radon measurement and remediation methods are well developed, and the EPA recommends that every home be measured for radon. The EPA estimates that materials and labor costs for radon reduction in an existing home are $800-$2,500. Including radon resistant techniques in new home construction costs $350-$500, and can save up to $65 annually in energy costs, according to the EPA.

Take-home hazards from work/hobbies and work at home: When the clothing, hair, skin, or shoes of workers become contaminated with hazardous materials in the workplace, such contaminants may inadvertently be carried to the home environment and/or an automobile. Such “take-home” exposures have been demonstrated, for example, in homes of lead-exposed workers. In addition, certain hobbies or workplaces located in the home may provide an especially great risk of household contamination.

Control methods include storing and laundering work clothes separately, and showering and changing clothes before leaving work or immediately after arriving at home. Once a home becomes contaminated, cleaning floors and contact surfaces, and replacing furnishings may be necessary to reduce exposures.

Unintentional injuries/fire: Unintentional injury is now the leading cause of death and disability among children younger than 15 years of age. In 1997, nearly 7 million persons in the U.S. were disabled for at least one full day by unintentional injuries received at home. During the same year, 28,400 deaths were attributable to unintentional home injuries, of which 1,800 occurred among children four years of age and younger. Among young children, three types of events accounted for more than 75 percent of deaths: fires/ burns; drowning; and mechanical suffocation. Falls and poisoning are the next most common causes of death.

Home visitation protocols have been shown to be effective in reducing exposure to such hazards. The “add-on” cost of injury prevention measures, when combined with other housing interventions are estimated at about $100 per unit. This includes the cost of some injury prevention devices (e.g., smoke alarms, electrical socket covers, etc.).

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BILLING CODE 4210-32-C

Appendix C: Preparing Your Application Back to Top

Rating Factor 1: Capacity of the Applicant and Relevant Organizational Experience

In this rating factor, you should provide details about the following:

1. The skills and experience of the staff and the applicant organization;

2. A description of the participating organization, its roles and experience;

3. The past performance of the organization (applicant or partners) in another Healthy Homes or Lead Hazard Control grant, another grant related to environmental health and safety issues, or other experience in a similar program; include the name of the project, funding organization, amount funded and desired outcomes and results achieved in these projects;

4. The percentage of time each staff person or subcontractor will devote to the project. A staffing table or roster may be helpful to address this element. You may want to use the template provided as Worksheet 1 of Appendix B;

5. Level of involvement of the applicant organization in general oversight of the project and oversight of the partnering organizations.

Rating Factor 2: Need/Extent of the Problem

In this rating factor, you should provide details about the following:

1. The location of the target area(s) and the rationale for selecting these area(s); include backup documentation;

2. The number of children at risk of environmental illnesses or injuries, and the sources of this information;

3. The age and condition of the housing to receive interventions, and the sources of this information;

4. The number of low- and very low-income families and the demographic composition of families served by race, ethnicity, disability, size of family and ages of children, number of single-parent households in the target area(s);

5. Other socio-economic or environmental factors relating to need in the target area(s);

6. The relationship of the Consolidated Plan, Indian Housing Plan or the Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice (AI) to the request for assistance.

Rating Factor 3: Soundness of Approach

In this rating factor, you should provide details about the following:

1. A project work plan that identifies tasks, deliverables, and quality assurance activities and describes how the applicant will organize and perform Healthy Homes activities;

2. A schedule of deliverables and project milestones;

3. The target population for the project and the selection criteria involved, and the relationship of the activities to “Need/Extent of the Problem” as established in Rating Factor 2;

4. The number of families or individuals to be enrolled and/or units to receive assessment and interventions;

5. The rationale for selecting hazards of concern and intervention methods;

6. The mechanism for funding assessments and interventions;

7. The costs/unit for intervention;

8. The medical case management process, if applicable;

9. The process used to develop work specifications;

10. The temporary relocation plan, if appropriate, that includes who will decide on the need for relocation and the source of funding for relocation. Indicate how you will distinguish between temporary and permanent relocation and the benefits to be provided;

11. Awareness, outreach and education activities;

12. A discussion of project evaluation, data collection, and outcome analysis;

13. The proposed budget, with justification of costs by task;

14. Actions to affirmatively further fair housing;

15. Provisions for employment and economic development opportunities for low- and very low-income individuals;

16. Mechanisms for communication between the applicant organization and partners; and

17. The coordination of activities in this project with other similar projects being performed by the applicant or partnering organizations.

Rating Factor 4: Leveraging Resources

In this rating factor, you should provide details about the following:

1. Identify participating faith-based and community-based organizations and other private sector organizations that will contribute time and resources to the project;

2. Include (in Appendix 1 of your application) letters of commitment or memoranda of understanding from organizations. These letters must provide details about resources to be contributed and a dollar amount for the contributed (in-kind or matching) resources. (Letters of support that do not provide a dollar amount of contributed funding should be included in Appendix 2 of your application.);

3. Applicants should provide a discussion of their plans to enhance or expand partnership efforts under this application;

4. Describe how the effectiveness of grant funds will be increased as a result of leveraged efforts; and

5. Describe any existing or potential Community Reinvestment Act funding mechanisms.

Rating Factor 5: Achieving Results and Program Evaluation

In this rating factor, you should provide details about the following:

1. Desired outcomes for your project;

2. Mechanisms for collecting and archiving data to develop the outcome analysis; and

3. Include a Logic Model in this Rating Factor. (Information about developing a Logic Model is available at www.hud.gov.), and in the General Section of this SuperNOFA.

A tabular summary of the Rating Factors and Bonus Points is provided below. Back to Top

Rating Factor Points
1. Capacity of the Applicant and Relevant Organizational Experience 20
2. Need/Extent of the Problem 15
3. Soundness of Approach 40
4. Leveraging Resources 10
5. Achieving Results and Program Evaluation 15
Empowerment Zone and Enterprise Community Bonus. 2
Total 102

Appendix D: References Back to Top

To secure any of the documents listed, call the telephone number provided. A number of these references are provided on HUD's CD, “Residential Lead Desktop Reference, 3rd Edition.” This CD can be obtained at no charge by calling the National Lead Information Clearinghouse, 800-424-LEAD. If you are a hearing-or speech-impaired person, you may reach the telephone numbers listed in this section through TTY by calling the toll-free Federal Information Relay Service at 800-877-8339.

Regulations

1. Worker Protection: The two Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) publications listed below can be purchased by calling either OSHA Regulations at 202-693-1888 or the Government Printing Office (GPO) at 202-512-1800 (these are not toll-free numbers).

(a) General Industry Lead Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1025 (Document Number 869022001124). This document can be downloaded without charge from the OSHA website at www.osha-slc.gov/OshStd_data/1910_1025.html;

(b) Lead Exposure in Construction, 29 CFR 1926.62, and appendices A, B, C, and D (Document Number 869022001141). This document can be downloaded without charge from the OSHA website at www.osha-slc.gov/OshStd_data/1926_0062.html.

2. Waste Disposal. A copy of the EPA regulations at 40 CFR parts 260-268 can be purchased by calling 1-800-424-9346 (this is a toll-free number) downloaded without charge from the EPA website at www.epa.gov/docs/epacfr40/chapt-I.info/subch-I.htm.

3. Lead.

(a) Requirements for Lead-Based Paint Activities in Target Housing and Child-Occupied Facilities; Final Rule: 40 CFR Part 745, (EPA) (Lead Hazard Standards, Work Practice Standards, EDP and State Certification and Accreditation programs for those engaged in lead-based paint activities). Can be purchased by calling the Toxic Substances Control Act Hotline at 202-554-1404 (this is not a toll-free number) or downloaded from without charge from the EPA website at www.epa.gov/lead.

Guidelines

1. Guidelines for the Evaluation and Control of Lead-Based Paint Hazards in Housing; HUD, June 1995, and amended September 1997. These guidelines can be purchased by calling 800-245-2691 toll free or downloaded without charge from the HUD website at www.hud.gov/offices/lead.

2. Preventing Lead Poisoning in Young Children; Centers for Disease Control, October 1991. These guidelines can be obtained without charge by calling the CDC's toll-free number, 888-232-6789 or they can be downloaded from the HUD website at www.hud.gov/offices/lead.

3. Screening Young Children for Lead Poisoning: Guidance for State and Local Public Health Officials, November 1997; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). These guidelines can be obtained without charge by calling the CDC's toll-free number, 888-232-6789 or they can be downloaded from the HUD website at www.hud.gov/offices/lead.

Reports

1. Putting the Pieces Together: Controlling Lead Hazards in the Nation's Housing, (Summary and Full Report); HUD, July 1995. A copy of this summary and report may be purchased by calling 800-245-2691 toll-free or through the HUD website at www.hud.gov/offices/lead.

2. The Healthy Homes Initiative: A Preliminary Plan (Summary and Full Report); HUD, April, 1999. A copy of this summary report may be obtained by calling NLIC's toll-free number, 800-424-LEAD, or downloaded from the HUD Web site at www.hud.gov/offices/lead.

3. Institute of Medicine. Indoor Allergens. Assessing and Controlling Adverse Health Effects. National Academy Press. Washington, DC 1993.

4. Mott L., Our Children at Risk. Natural Resources Defense Council. Washington, DC 1997. Can be ordered from the Internet from: www.nrdc.org.

5. Rom W.N., Ed. Environmental and Occupational Medicine. Little, Brown and Co., Boston. 1992.

6. President's Task Force on Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks to Children. Asthma and The Environment: An Action Plan to Protect Children. Washington, DC 1999.

7. Eliminating Childhood Lead Poisoning: A Federal Strategy Targeting Lead Paint Hazards. Washington, DC, 2000. Can be downloaded from the Internet without charge from: www.epa.gov/children.

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Appendix F: Administrative Costs Back to Top

I. Purpose Back to Top

The intent of this HUD grant program is to allow the Grantee to be reimbursed for the reasonable direct and indirect costs, subject to a top limit, for overall management of the grant. In some instances the grantee, whether a state or a local government, principally serves as a conduit to pass funding to sub-grantees, which are to be responsible for the conducting healthy homes-related work. Congress set a top limit of ten percent of the total grant sum for the grantee to perform the function of overall management of the grant program, including passing on funding to sub-grantees. The cost of that function, for the purpose of this grant, is defined as the “administrative cost” of the grant, and is limited to ten percent of the total grant amount. The balance of ninety percent or more of the total grant sum is reserved for sub-grantees or other direct-performers of healthy homes demonstration work. These activities include, but are not necessarily limited to outreach, training, enrollment, home assessments and remediation and parent/child and public education.

II. Administrative Costs: What They Are Not Back to Top

For the purposes of this HUD grant program for states and local governments to provide support for the evaluation and remediation of health hazards in low- and moderate-income target housing, the term “administrative costs” should not be confused with the terms “general and administrative cost,” “indirect costs,” “overhead,” and “burden rate.” These are accounting terms usually represented by a government-accepted standard percentage rate. The percentage rate allocates a fair share of an organization's costs that cannot be attributed to a particular project or department (such as the chief executive's salary or the costs of the organization's headquarters building) to all projects and operating departments (such as the Fire Department, the Police Department, the Community Development Department, the Health Department or this program). Such allocated costs are added to those projects' or departments' direct costs to determine their total costs to the organization.

III. Administrative Costs: What They Are Back to Top

For the purposes of this HUD grant program, “Administrative Costs” are the grantee's allowable direct costs for the overall management of the grant program plus the allocable indirect costs. The allowable limit of such costs that can be reimbursed under this program is 10 percent of the total grant sum. Should the grantee's actual costs for overall management of the grant program exceed 10 percent of the total grant sum, those excess costs shall be paid for by the grantee. However, excess costs paid for by the grantee may be shown as part of the requirement for cost-sharing funds to support the grant.

IV. Administrative Costs: Definition Back to Top

A. General

Administrative costs are the allowable, reasonable, and allocable direct and indirect costs related to the overall management of the HUD grant for Healthy Homes activities. Those costs shall be segregated in a separate cost center within the grantee's accounting system, and they are eligible costs for reimbursement as part of the grant, subject to the ten percent limit. Such administrative costs do not include any of the staff and overhead costs directly arising from specific sub-grantee program activities eligible under Section III of this NOFA because those costs are eligible for reimbursement under a separate cost center as a direct part of project activities.

The grantee may elect to serve solely as a conduit to sub-grantees, who will in turn perform the direct program activities eligible under Section III(C)(1) of this NOFA, or the grantee may elect to perform all or a part of the direct program activities in other parts of its own organization, which shall have their own segregated, cost centers for those direct program activities. In either case, not more than 10 percent of the total HUD grant sum may be devoted to administrative costs, and not less than 90 percent of the total grant sum shall be devoted to direct program activities. The grantee shall take care not to mix or attribute administrative costs to the direct project cost centers.

B. Specific

Reasonable costs for the grantee's overall grant management, coordination, monitoring, and evaluation are eligible administrative costs. Subject to the 10 percent limit, such costs include, but are not limited to, necessary expenditures for the following goods, activities and services:

(1) Salaries, wages, and related costs of the grantee's staff, the staff of affiliated agencies or organizations, or other staff engaged in grantee's overall grant management activities. In charging costs to this category the recipient may either include the entire salary, wages, and related costs allocable to the program for each person whose primary responsibilities (more than 65 percent of their time) with regard to the grant program involve direct overall grant management assignments, or the pro rata share of the salary, wages, and related costs of each person whose job includes any overall grant management assignments. The grantee may use only one of these two methods during this program. Overall grant management includes the following types of activities:

(a) Preparing grantee program budgets and schedules, and amendments thereto;

(b) Developing systems for the selection and award of funding to sub-grantees and other sub-recipients;

(c) Developing suitable agreements for use with sub-grantees and other sub-recipients to carry out grant activities;

(d) Developing systems for assuring compliance with program requirements;

(e) Monitoring sub-grantee and sub-recipient activities for progress and compliance with program requirements;

(f) Preparing presentations, reports, and other documents related to the program for submission to HUD;

(g) Evaluating program results against stated objectives;

(h) Providing local officials and citizens with information about the overall grant program; however, a more general education program, helping the public understand the nature of home environmental triggers and their health consequences is a direct project support activity);

(i) Coordinating the resolution of overall grant audit and monitoring findings; and

(j) Managing or supervising persons whose responsibilities with regard to the program include such assignments as those described in paragraphs (a) through (i).

(2) Travel costs incurred for official business in carrying out the overall grant management;

(3) Administrative services performed under third party contracts or agreements, for services directly allocable to grant management such as: legal services, accounting services, and audit services;

(4) Other costs for goods and services required for and directly related to the overall management of the grant program; and including such goods and services as telephone, postage, rental of equipment, renter's insurance for the program management space, utilities, office supplies, and rental and maintenance (but not purchase) of office space for the program.

(5) The fair and allocable share of grantee's general costs that are not directly attributable to specific projects or operating departments such as salaries, office expenses and other related costs for university or local officials (e.g., mayor and city council members, dean, president etc.), and expenses for a city or university's legal or accounting department which are not charged back to particular projects or other operating departments. If a grantee has an established burden rate, it should be used; if not, the grantee shall be assigned a negotiated provisional burden rate, subject to final audit.

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Operation Lead Elimination Action Program (LEAP) Back to Top

Overview Information

A. Federal Agency Name: Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control.

B. Funding Opportunity Title: Operation Lead Elimination Action Program (LEAP)

C. Announcement Type: Initial announcement.

D. Funding Opportunity Number: FR-4900-N-14, OMB Approval number 2539-0015.

E. Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number: 14.903, Operation Lead Elimination Action Program.

F. Dates: Application Deadline: A completed original and three copies of your application must be submitted to HUD on or before the application due date. The application due date is July 13, 2004. Please see the General Section of the SuperNOFA for application submission, delivery and timely receipt requirements.

G. Additional Overview Content Information:

1. Purpose of the Program. The purpose of the Operation Lead Elimination Action Program (LEAP) is to provide grants to private sector and nonprofit organizations to conduct activities that leverage additional funding for addressing lead hazards in privately owned housing units and eliminating lead poisoning as a major public health threat to young children.

2. Available Funds. Approximately $9 million in Fiscal Year (FY) 2004 funds.

3. Eligible Applicants. To be eligible to apply for funding under this program, the applicant must be a tax-exempt nonprofit (501(c)(3)), or other non-profit or for-profit entity or firm. For-profit institutions are not allowed to earn a fee. Colleges and universities are also eligible to apply. National and local parent groups are encouraged to apply. States and units of general local government and their departments are not eligible.

Full Text of Announcement Back to Top

I. Funding Opportunity Description Back to Top

A. Program Description

Operation LEAP funds are for grants to private sector and nonprofit organizations for activities that leverage additional funding for addressing lead hazards in eligible privately owned housing units and eliminating lead poisoning as a major public health threat to young children. HUD's authority for making funding available under this NOFA is the Consolidated Appropriations Act for Fiscal Year (2004). Leveraged funds must be spent exclusively on addressing lead hazards in eligible privately owned housing units for which no other funding is available. Applicants are encouraged to employ creativity and initiative in mobilizing resources expeditiously for lead hazard control prevention efforts. Based upon the responses provided to the rating factors criteria described below, grants will be awarded to those entities that submit a detailed plan and strategy that demonstrates adequate capacity to implement the program and who demonstrate the ability to generate and use private sector resources for lead hazard control prevention efforts.

LEAP funds may also be used to eliminate lead-based paint hazards in low-income privately owned housing as well as implementing other lead hazard control strategies as defined by Title X of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1992 (42 U.S.C. 4851 et seq.). However, these activities are only eligible if they are tied directly to a leveraging strategy. For example, LEAP funds could be used to fund the replacement of windows that are determined to be a lead-based paint hazard, while leveraged funds from owners could be used to do paint stabilization elsewhere in the unit (or in other units) where lead-based paint hazards are present.

II. Award Information Back to Top

Funding Available: Approximately $9 million in Fiscal Year (FY) 2004 funds. The maximum award shall be $2 million per grant. HUD anticipates that approximately 5-10 grants will be awarded. The period of performance is 42 months (24 months for leveraging private sector resources followed by 18 months of activities utilizing leveraged funds for lead-related work). HUD reserves the right to approve no cost time extensions for a period not to exceed 12 months.

III. Eligibility Information Back to Top

See the General Section of the SuperNOFA for additional eligibility requirements applicable to HUD Programs.

A. Eligible Applicants

To be eligible to apply for funding under this program, the applicant must be a tax-exempt nonprofit (501(c)(3)), or other non-profit or for-profit entity or firm. For-profit institutions are not allowed to earn a fee. Colleges and universities are also eligible. National and local parent groups are encouraged to apply. States and units of general local government and their departments are not eligible. Applicants who received awards under the Fiscal Year 2003 Notice of Funding Availability published in the Federal Register on April 25, 2003 cycle are eligible to apply under this NOFA.

B. Cost Sharing or Matching

There is no match requirement for this grant.

C. Other

To be eligible for funding under this NOFA, the applicant must meet all federal statutory and regulatory requirements applicable to this program including 24 CFR part 84 and applicable OMB circulars (i.e., cost principal, uniform administrative requirements, audits). In addition, you will be required to comply with all State and local statutes, regulations or other applicable requirements.

1. Threshold Requirements. As an applicant, you and any subrecipient must meet all of the threshold requirements in section III. C. of the General Section of the SuperNOFA. Applications will not be rated or ranked if they do not meet the threshold requirements.

2. Eligible Activities. Activities conducted for the purpose of developing local or regional strategies designed to leverage or mobilize resources from the private sector. These activities may include, but are not necessarily limited to:

a. Providing technical lead safety training to workers or supervisors regarding lead safe work practices;

b. Conducting outreach and related activities that are directly tied to a leveraging strategy, and that will result in increased lead hazard control activities in low-income privately owned or owner occupied housing with lead-based paint hazards.

c. Lead hazard control activities tied directly to a leveraging strategy and conducted in low- and very low-income eligible privately-owned rental and occupied housing units, including:

(1) Performing dust, paint or soil testing, hazard screens, inspections, and risk assessments of eligible housing constructed before 1978 to determine the presence of lead-based paint and/or lead hazards from paint, dust, or soil;

(2) Conducting lead hazard control, which may include interim control of lead-based paint hazards in housing (which may include specialized cleaning techniques to address lead dust); or abatement of lead-based paint hazards, including soil and dust, by means of removal, enclosure, encapsulation, or replacement methods. Unless there are only a few surfaces coated with lead paint, complete abatement of all lead-based paint or lead-contaminated soil is not usually acceptable as a cost-effective strategy unless justification is provided and subsequently approved by HUD. Abatement of lead-contaminated soil should be limited to areas with bare soil in the immediate vicinity of the structure, i.e., drip line or foundation of the structure being treated, and children's play areas. All hazard control activities must comply with 24 CFR part 35, subpart R, the HUD Guidelines for the Evaluation and Control of Lead-Based Paint Hazards in Housing and all applicable Federal, State, and local regulations; in the case of a conflict between any of the above, the more stringent shall apply;

(3) Carrying out temporary relocation of families and individuals during the period in which lead hazard control is conducted and until the time the affected unit receives clearance for re-occupancy;

(4) Performing blood lead testing and air sampling to protect the health of the hazard control workers, supervisors, and contractors; and

(5) Undertaking minimal housing rehabilitation activities that are specifically required to carry out effective hazard control, and without which the hazard control could not be completed and maintained. Operation LEAP grant funds may be used for lead hazard control work done in conjunction with other housing rehabilitation programs. HUD strongly encourages integration of this grant program with housing rehabilitation, weatherization, and other energy conservation activities.

(6) Conducting clearance dust-wipe testing and associated laboratory analysis.

(7) Purchasing or leasing no more than two (2) X-ray fluorescence analyzers for use by the Program, if not already available.

d. Eligible costs that include providing all necessary administrative and indirect support, including rent, equipment, materials, travel expenses and logistics, and subcontractor/consultant costs necessary to carryout grant activities.

3. Program Requirements. In general, applicants conducting lead hazard control activities must ensure that work is conducted in compliance with the applicable requirements of HUD's Lead-Safe Housing Regulation, 24 CFR Part 35, and as clarified in HUD's Interpretive Guidance about the rule located at http://www.hud.gov/offices/lead/guidelines/leadsaferule/index.cfm.

a. Eligible Housing Units. LEAP funds may be used to support lead hazard control work in eligible low- and very low-income privately owned rental and occupied housing units. Refer to section IV. E of this NOFA for a list (Eligibility of HUD Assisted Housing) of the HUD-associated housing programs that meet the definition of eligible housing under this program.

b. Continued Availability of Lead-Safe Housing to Low-Income Families. Units in which lead hazards have been controlled under this program shall be occupied by and/or continue to be available to low-income families for at least three years as required by Title X (section 1011). The grantee must also notify the owner of the information that is collected so that the owner will comply with disclosure requirements under 24 CFR part 35, subpart A.

c. Testing. For applicants conducting lead hazard control activities, all testing and sampling shall conform to the current HUD Guidelines and Federal, State, or tribal regulations developed as part of the appropriate contractor certification program whichever is more stringent. Testing must be conducted according to the HUD Guidelines, located at http://www.hud.gov/offices/lead/guidelines/hudguidelines/index.cfm, and the EPA lead hazard standards rule at 40 CFR part 745. All test results must be provided to the owner in a timely fashion, together with a notice describing the owner's legal duty to disclose the results to tenants and buyers under 24 CFR part 35, subpart A. All units undergoing lead hazard control must have clearance testing performed.

(1) Lead-Based Paint and Lead-Based Paint Hazard Identification. For applicants conducting lead hazard control activities, an inspection or risk assessment is required. You should ensure that lead paint inspection and risk assessment reports are conducted in accordance with established protocols and sufficient to support hazard control decisions.

(2) Clearance Testing. For applicants conducting lead hazard control activities, clearance testing shall be completed in accordance with Chapter 15 of the HUD Guidelines and the EPA lead hazards standards rule at 40 CFR part 745 for abatement projects and the Lead-Safe Housing Regulation (24 CFR part 35) for lead hazard control activities or other abatement. The clearance standards shall be the more restrictive of those set by the local jurisdiction or by EPA or HUD.

(3) Blood Lead Testing: Before lead hazard control work begins, HUD recommends that each occupant who is under six years of age be tested for lead poisoning prior to proceeding with the housing intervention. Any child with an elevated blood lead level should be referred for appropriate medical follow-up. The standards for such testing are described in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) publications Preventing Lead Poisoning in Young Children (1991), and Screening Young Children for Lead Poisoning: Guidance for State and Local Public Health Officials (1997).

d. Written Policies and Procedures. For applicants conducting lead hazard control activities, you must have clearly established written policies and procedures for eligibility, program marketing, unit selection, expediting work on homes occupied by children with elevated blood lead levels, and all phases of lead hazard control, including risk assessment, inspection, development of specifications, pre-hazard control blood lead testing, financing, relocation, and clearance testing. Grantees, subcontractors, sub-grantees, sub-recipients, and their contractors must adhere to these policies and procedures.

e. Prohibited Practices. For applicants conducting lead hazard control activities, you must not engage in the following prohibited practices:

(1) Open flame burning or torching;

(2) Machine sanding or grinding without a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) exhaust control;

(3) Uncontained hydro blasting or high-pressure wash;

(4) Abrasive blasting or sandblasting without HEPA exhaust control;

(5) Heat guns operating above 1,100 degrees Fahrenheit;

(6) Chemical paint strippers containing methylene chloride or other volatile hazardous chemicals in a poorly ventilated space; and

(7) Dry scraping or dry sanding, except scraping in conjunction with heat guns or around electrical outlets or when treating no more than two square feet in any one interior room or space, or totaling no more than 20 square feet on exterior surfaces.

f. Research. In conformance with the Common Rule (Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects, codified by HUD at 24 CFR part 60), for applicants conducting blood lead testing as part of a research effort, your organization must provide an assurance (e.g., a letter signed by an appropriate official) that the research has been reviewed and approved by an Institutional Review Board (IRB) before you can receive funds from HUD for activities that require IRB approval. Before receiving such funds, you must also provide the number for your organization's assurance (i.e., an “institutional assurance”) that has been approved by the Department of Health and Human Service's Office of Human Research Protections (OHRP). For additional information on what constitutes human subject research or how to obtain an institutional assurance see the OHRP Web site at http://ohrp.osophs.dhhs.gov/.

g. Conducting Business in Accordance with HUD Core Values and Ethical Standards. Refer to the General Section of the SuperNOFA for information about conducting business in accordance with HUD's core values and ethical standards.

4. DUNS Requirement. Refer to the General Section of the SuperNOFA for information regarding the DUNS requirement. You will need to obtain a DUNS number to receive an award from HUD.

5. Eligibility of HUD-Assisted Housing. The chart “Eligibility of HUD-Assisted Housing” below lists the “eligible” housing units that may participate under LEAP when lead hazard control is tied directly to a leveraging strategy.

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BILLING CODE 4210-32-C

IV. Application and Submission Information Back to Top

A. Addresses To Request Application Package

1. Application Submission. See the General Section of the SuperNOFA for specific procedures concerning the form of application submission (e.g., mailed applications, express mail or overnight delivery). Be advised that there is no Application Kit for the Operation Lead Elimination Action Program. All the information required to submit an application is contained in this Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA).

a. Guidebook and Further Information. You may request general information, copies of the General Section and Program Sections of the SuperNOFA from the SuperNOFA Information Center (800-HUD-8929 or 800-HUD-2209 (TTY)) between the hours of 9 a.m. and 8 p.m. (eastern time) Monday through Friday, except on Federal holidays. When requesting information, please refer to the name of the program you are interested in. Be sure to provide your name, address (including zip code), and telephone number (including area code). To ensure sufficient time to prepare your application, requests for copies of the SuperNOFA or this NOFA can be made immediately following publication of the SuperNOFA. The SuperNOFA Information Center opens for business simultaneously with the publication of HUD's 2004 NOFAs. You can obtain information on this SuperNOFA and download application information for this SuperNOFA through the Web site http://www.grants.gov.

B. Content and Form of Application Submission

1. Application Submission Requirements for the Operation Lead Elimination Action Program (LEAP). Applicants under this category of the NOFA are to follow the submission requirements described below.

a. Application Information.

(1) Application Format. The application narrative response to the Rating Factors are limited to a maximum of 15 pages. Your response must be typewritten on one side only on 81/2× 11 inch paper, using a standard 12-point font, with not less than “ inch margins on all sides. Appendices should be referenced and discussed in the narrative response. Materials provided in the appendices should directly apply to the rating factor narrative.

(2) Application Checklist (voluntary). Your application must contain all of the required information noted in this Program Section and the General Section of the SuperNOFA. These items include the standard forms, certifications, and assurances listed in the General Section of this SuperNOFA that are applicable to this funding (collectively referred to as the “standard forms”). The standard forms can be found in the General Section of the SuperNOFA. The “Checklist and Submission Table of Contents” below includes a listing of the required items needed for submitting a complete application and receiving consideration for funding. You are to assemble the application in the order shown in the Checklist and Submission Table of Contents and note the corresponding page number where the response is located. Inclusion of this Checklist and Submission Table of Contents with your proposal is recommended but not required.

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The following are the items to be included in an application:

(a) Transmittal Letter. A transmittal letter that identifies the applicant(s) submitting the application, the dollar amount requested, what the program funds are requested for, and the nature of involvement with community-based organizations. Also include the name, mailing address, telephone number, and principal contact person of the applicant. If you have consortium associates, sub-grantees, partners, major subcontractors, joint venture participants, or others contributing resources to your project, you must provide similar information for each of these partners;

(b) Checklist and Submission Table of Contents (voluntary)

(c) Abstract Summary. Provide an abstract summary describing the goals and objectives of the proposed program (two-page maximum); including—

(i) The total amount of the federal request and the amount of the matching contribution for the entire period of performance;

(ii) The specific activities that will be conducted;

(iii) The organization(s) that will participate in the program; and

(iv) Your prior activities, experience and achievements in related work.

(d) Forms. All standard forms as required by the General Section of the SuperNOFA and program Form HUD-96009 (Work Plan Development Worksheet With Minimum Benchmark Performance Standards).

(e) Budget. A total budget summary (total budget is the federal share and leveraged contribution) with supporting narrative and cost justifications for all budget categories of your grant request. A maximum of ten percent of the federal share can be for administrative costs.

An itemized breakout (using the HUD Form-424CBW) of leveraged contributions that are directly received by the project or subrecipients should be documented including:

(i) Values placed on donated in-kind services;

(ii) Letters or other evidence of commitment from donors; and

(iii) The amounts and sources of contributed resources; and

(f) Partners. Contracts, Memoranda of Understanding or Agreement, letters of commitment or other documentation must describe the proposed roles of agencies, local broad-based task forces, participating faith-based or other community- or neighborhood-based groups or organizations, local businesses, and others working with the program. For-profit entities and/or firms must clearly demonstrate and document how activities, including the lead-based paint hazard identification and control measures to be undertaken by the applicant will be coordinated with local organizations, state(s) or units of general local government to carry out lead hazard control and other program activities.

Other leveraged resources not received directly by the project and subrecipients but used to support program activities should be included in the narrative response to Rating Factor 3, but not on HUD Form 424-CBW. Applicants should describe their methodology for tracking leveraged resources not directly received by the project or subrecipients. c. Rating Factor Responses—Proposed Activities. All applications must, at a minimum, describe the proposed activities in the narrative responses to the rating factors. Your narrative statement must be numbered in accordance with each factor for award (Rating Factors 1 through 4).

C. Submission Dates and Times

1. Application Due Date. The application due date is July 13, 2004. Refer to the General Section of the SuperNOFA for additional submission requirements including acceptable submission methods, acceptable proof of delivery and other information to assist the applicant.

D. Intergovernmental Review

Not applicable.

E. Funding Restrictions

1. Ineligible Activities. You may not use grant funds for any of the following:

a. Purchase of real property;

b. Chelation or other medical treatment costs related to children with elevated blood lead levels; and

c. Lead hazard abatement activities in public housing, or project-based Section 8 housing.

F. Other Submission Requirements

Refer to the General Section of the SuperNOFA for other application submission requirements.

1. Addresses and Number of Copies. The applicant, must submit an original and three copies of a complete application to: HUD Headquarters, Robert C. Weaver Federal Building, 451 Seventh Street, SW., Room P3206, Washington, DC 20410; Attn: LEAP.

V. Application Review Information Back to Top

A. Criteria

The factors for award used to evaluate and rate applications include:

  • Rating Factor 1: Organizational Capacity.
  • Rating Factor 2: Approach.
  • Rating Factor 3: Leveraging Resources.
  • Rating Factor 4: Achieving Results and Program Evaluation.

Applicants are encouraged to employ creativity and initiative in mobilizing resources expeditiously for lead hazard control prevention efforts. Based upon the responses provided to the rating factors described below, grants will be awarded to those entities who submit a detailed strategy that demonstrates adequate capacity to carry out the proposed use of funds and who demonstrate the ability to generate and use private sector resources for lead hazard control prevention efforts. The factors for rating and ranking applicants, and maximum points for each factor, are delineated below. The maximum number of points to be awarded is 100.

1. Rating Factor 1: Organizational Capacity (30 points)

This factor addresses the applicant's organizational capacity to successfully implement the proposed activities in a timely manner.

a. Staff Experience (20 points). Describe the knowledge and experience of the staff responsible for the following functions: Executive Direction; Finance, Marketing; and Program Coordination. The applicant must have sufficient qualified personnel or be able to quickly retain qualified experts or professionals in financial/grant management, marketing, and/or lead-based paint programs that will allow you to immediately begin your proposed work program and to perform your proposed activities within the 42-month period of performance.

The applicant's narrative should include information about your organizational and staff capacity in raising and/or leveraging funds, and in successfully garnering private sector support recently (e.g., within the past five years). Include a discussion of staff knowledge and expertise in raising and/or leveraging funds, possessing the prerequisite organizational skills, and lead poisoning prevention activities.

The discussion on capacity should include the depth, experience, the commitment of time to the program, salary information, and position titles of the program staff.

Resumes or detailed job announcements for the above key positions must be included as an appendix to your application. Indicate the percentage of time key personnel will devote to the proposed project. An applicant may demonstrate capacity by thoroughly describing prior experience in this type of activity and/or how the applicant will develop the necessary capacity to carryout proposed activities.

b. Grants Management (4 points). Describe the agency's or organization's ability to manage grants and leveraged program funds and activities.

c. Partner Expertise (4 points). Describe project participants/partners knowledge and experience regarding lead poisoning as a public health threat to children, and/or lead-based paint issues and hazard control. Use of staff with more recent, relevant, and demonstrated successful experience will result in a higher rating.

d. Removal of Barriers to Affordable Housing (2 points). A new applicant will be awarded up to two points under Rating Factor 1 for activities that remove barriers to affordable housing within their communities, support state and local efforts to streamline processes and procedures, eliminate redundant requirements, statutes, regulations, and codes which impede the availability of affordable housing. This priority relates to HUD's Strategic Goals for Increasing Homeownership Opportunities and Promoting Decent Affordable Housing.

2. Rating Factor 2: Approach (40 points)

This factor addresses the approach and strategy that the applicant intends to follow in meeting the goals and objectives of the program. This strategy should address the following:

a. Selection Process for Partner Organization (5 points). Describe the selection process for those organizations that are to conduct or coordinate work activities for lead hazard control, outreach, evaluation, etc and discuss how you intend to involve faith-based or other community-based organizations in your proposed activities.

b. Strategy and Approach (35 points). (1) Leveraging Strategy. Describe the proposed strategy for leveraging private sector resources including:

(a) Target audiences/constituencies;

(b) Use of contractors/subgrantees/partners and their method of selection;

(c) Methods of outreach/promotion;

(d) Types of leveraging to be employed;

(e) Proposed use and distribution of funds/resources leveraged;

(f) Overall project management and coordination; and

(g) Proposed schedule of activities within the 42-month period of performance.

(2) Work Plan Strategy. The work plan strategy narrative shall include:

(a) The management plan that describes how the project will be managed, and the timeline for staffing the program. Applicants should develop a work plan that includes specific, measurable and time-phased objectives for each major program activity. The applicant's work plan should reflect the benchmark standards with quarterly milestones for proposed program activities and expenditures, and that will provide HUD with measurable outcome results to be achieved with the requested funds. Measurable outcome results should be stated in terms relevant to the purpose of the program funds as a direct result of the work performed within the performance period of the grant.

(b) A detailed description of how assistance and funding will flow from the grantee to the actual performers of the work;

(c) The selection process for sub-grantees, sub-contractors and/or sub-recipients (if any);

(d) The evaluation process used to measure program performance;

(e) The overall objectives for activities. Quarterly performance milestones are to be developed to achieve the overall objectives for these activities;

(f) Performance benchmarks have been developed. The benchmarks referred to in this NOFA can also be found on the HUD Web site at: http://www.hud.gov/offices/lead/grantfrm/hudgrantee.cfm. Development of your work plan should include and reflect these benchmark standards.

(g) A successful applicant's award is contingent upon budget negotiation and approval of a work plan.

(3) Strategies/Approaches. The applicant is encouraged to employ creativity and initiative in achieving the objectives of the program. Some examples of possible strategies/approaches include the following:

(a) Enlisting the support and resource commitment of financial institutions, foundations, private industry, the general public, property owners, and others to make residential housing lead-safe and eliminate lead poisoning as a public health threat to children;

(b) Soliciting the support of national building materials providers, building component manufacturers, and housing-related national retail outlets to donate money and/or materials to lead hazard control programs in housing and health departments, landlords and owner-occupants to eliminate lead-based paint hazards in privately owned low-income dwellings: For example, a window, wallboard, or paint manufacturer/retailer could donate or coordinate the donation and distribution of windows or paint to lead-based paint and/or rehabilitation projects throughout the country. This strategy could also include the distribution of discount coupons for purchases of paint or other materials from national supplies;

(c) Forming partnerships with banks or other mortgage or financial institutions willing to provide no or low-interest home improvement loans to finance lead hazard control activities and abatement measures among low-income recipients who would not otherwise be served. By participating, banks could fulfill a major element of their responsibilities under the Community Reinvestment Act;

(d) Forming partnerships to facilitate the coordination and distribution of donated building materials, such as windows, trim molding, or paint, etc., to local projects involved in lead hazard control programs;

(e) Identifying and facilitating the availability and use of temporary relocation facilities for families who need to move out of their dwellings while lead hazard control work is being undertaken. For example, hotel chains, colleges, and other lead-safe sites could be contacted to make housing available for the temporary relocation of families during lead hazard control;

(f) Working with landlords, tenant groups and others to form consortia or otherwise engage landlords and owner-occupants to enroll their eligible housing units in local lead hazard control or rehabilitation programs. The applicant should obtain commitments from landlords to provide matching resources for work to be done on their units. For example, the lead hazard control program could offer landlords grant funds for replacement windows if the landlords contribute the cost of additional repairs (such as basic system upgrades, or other rehabilitation work including painting and maintenance) that is associated with lead hazard control. To encourage such commitments, efforts should be made to educate landlords about the primary benefits (effect on children's health) and supplementary benefits that can result from lead hazard reduction work such as improving an apartment's physical condition and marketability;

(g) Expanding dust testing and clearance testing, especially in high-risk communities;

(h) Promoting homebuilder, remodeler, or contractor associations to coordinate efforts to reduce lead hazards by contributing technical assistance, training, presentations and materials and/or labor to lead hazard control efforts;.

(i) Encouraging landscaping firms, nurseries, and landscape architects to contribute lead-safe soil, mulch, and other forms of vegetation cover and shrubbery designed to mitigate lead contamination of soil around the exterior/perimeter and play areas of affected housing units;

(j) Working with health, housing, and community development organizations or other entities to conduct lead poisoning prevention activities, including efforts to plan and/or facilitate or participate in strategic planning to eliminate lead poisoning as a public health threat to young children by 2010.

(k) Working with grassroots faith-based or other community-based organizations that are committed to improving the quality of life of young children in high risk housing; and

(l) Providing training for significant numbers of trades people to implement lead-safe work practices, such as window replacement and weatherization work.

3. Rating Factor 3: Leveraging Resources (20 points)

This factor addresses the applicant's ability to obtain and use private sector resources or leverage private sector activities that can be combined with HUD and other program resources to achieve program objectives. Private funds/resources do not include any public sector funds, e.g., funds provided by states and units of general local government including Community Development Block Grant (CDBG)/Home Investment Partnership (HOME) funds. Applicants are encouraged to use such funds as part of this program but these funds are not considered under this rating factor. Describe the types of public or private sector commitments, if any, currently available to devote to Operation LEAP grant program activities, and the anticipated future amounts to be generated. Based upon the estimated amount of funding anticipated for leveraging over the life of the award, identify the general geographic locations of the units that will be treated by this increased funding or leveraged resources. Also provide an estimate of the number of eligible housing units that can be expected to be treated and the number of low- and very low-income families that will benefit under LEAP. Generated resources may include cash or in-kind contributions of personnel, services, equipment, or supplies. In evaluating this factor, HUD will consider the extent to which the applicant has established working partnerships, memoranda of understanding, and/or firm agreements with other identified entities for the commitment of additional resources. Resources may be provided by any private source, including contributions of investor-owners. However, the donations of resources, goods, and services considered as leveraged resources should be based on market values and documented. Applicants that do not have such partnerships at the time of application will be required to establish partnerships immediately following notification of grant award. Only contributions that have a stated monetary value with supporting documentation from the contributing organization/entity authorized to make such commitment will be counted as leveraged funds. Firmly established commitments will be rated more highly than applications with commitments that have not yet been established. The most advantageous agreements will be those not solely dependent on LEAP funding, including those that create long-term commitments for leveraged funds beyond the period of the LEAP grant. Therefore it is preferable that LEAP funds act as “seed” funds so any future funding streams can be used to stimulate additional leveraging agreements and not simply support prior agreements. In evaluating this factor, HUD will examine the extent to which agreements provide for sustained contributions from non-public sources and allow for non-LEAP funds to support such leveraging in the future. Applicants that have targeted specific high-risk neighborhoods or geographic locations for leveraging/fundraising and abatement/control activities will receive a higher number of rating points. Describe what the organization has done in the recent past (e.g., within the past five years) that gives evidence of its ability and experience to leverage substantial private sector resources. Describe specific activities, the amount of funds or resources leveraged, and what the leveraged funds will be used to support. If an applicant has experience in generating funds or resources for purposes similar to addressing lead paint abatement or control measures, the applicant should describe those activities and the results achieved.

4. Rating Factor 4: Achieving Results and Program Evaluation (10 Points)

This factor emphasizes HUD's commitment to ensuring that applicants achieve the goals outlined in their work plan and other benchmark standards and assess their performance to ensure performance goals are met. Achieving results means you, the applicant, have clearly identified the benefits, or outcomes of your program. Outcomes are ultimate goals. Benchmarks or outputs are interim activities or products that lead to the ultimate achievement of your goals.Program evaluation requires that you, the applicant, identify program outcomes, interim products or benchmarks, and performance indicators that will allow you to measure your performance. Performance indicators should be objectively quantifiable and measure actual achievements against anticipated achievements. Your Evaluation Plan should identify what you are going to measure, how you are going measure it and the steps you have in place to make adjustments to your work plan if performance targets are not met within established timeframes. Applicants are required to complete the HUD Logic Form to supplement the narrative response to this rating factor.

a. An applicant is to identify and describe specific methods, measures, and tools that you will use (in addition to HUD reporting requirements) to measure progress, evaluate program effectiveness, and identify program changes necessary to improve performance. Describe how you will obtain, document and report the information. In evaluating this factor, HUD will consider how you have described outcome measures and benefits of your program including:

b. Ability to generate substantial private sector resources. The main objective of Operation LEAP is to leverage private sector resources to eliminate lead poisoning as a major public health threat to young children. The key terms here are “leverage private sector resources.” HUD is looking for those applicants that demonstrate the most realistic and successful fund raising and/or leveraging skills to mobilize substantial private sector resources for addressing lead hazards in housing.

c. Ability to demonstrate or develop a national and/or regional (multi-state) strategy for leveraging resources from the private sector is essential. Those resources should be realistic and achievable and made part of the work plan and benchmark activities of this proposal. The proposed budget should demonstrate how these leveraged funds will be used to address lead hazards in housing and make residential housing lead-safe and eliminate lead poisoning as a public health threat to children.

d. Results of any specific plans and objectives established to implement and/or maintain a registry (listing) of lead-safe housing that is available to the public, or to incorporate the inclusion of the lead-safe status of properties in another publicly accessible address-based property information system. Results could include how the information would be managed and affirmatively marketed to the public so that families (particularly low-income families with children under six years of age) can make informed decisions regarding their housing options. Applicants that demonstrate partnerships with national or regionally recognized material suppliers, e.g., sheet rock/drywall manufacturers or retailers, paint manufacturers or distributors, window manufacturers or distributors, etc., will receive stronger consideration.

e. The extent to which affirmatively furthering fair housing for all segments of the population is advanced by the proposed activities. Detail how the proposed work plan will support the community's efforts to affirmatively further affordable housing and discuss the impact of prior activities that have contributed to enhanced lead-safe housing opportunities.

f. How your program will be held accountable for meeting program goals, objectives, and the actions undertaken in implementing the grant program. Applicants should provide a description of the mechanism to assess progress and track performance in meeting the goals and objectives outlined in the work plan. Applicants should provide assurances that work plans and performance measures developed for the program will assist intended beneficiaries, and that work will be conducted in a timely and cost-effective manner.

B. Reviews and Selection Process

1. HUD's Strategic Goals

Refer to the General Section of the SuperNOFA for information on HUD's strategic goals.

2. Rating and Ranking

Please refer to the General Section of the SuperNOFA for details. Only those applications that meet the threshold review requirements will be rated and ranked according to their response to the Rating Factor Criteria included in this NOFA. The maximum number of points to be awarded is 100. A minimum score of 75 is required for fundable applications.

Rating factor Maximum points
Rating Factor 1: Organizational Capacity 30
Rating Factor 2: Approach 40
Rating Factor 3: Leveraging Resources 20
Rating Factor 4: Achieving Results and Program Evaluation 10
Total 100

VI. Award Administration Information Back to Top

A. Award Notices

1. Successful applicants will receive a letter from the Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control Grant Officer indicating that they have been selected for an award. This letter will provide additional details regarding the effective start date of the grant and any additional data and information to be submitted to execute a grant agreement. This letter is not an authorization to begin work or incur costs under the grant. A fully executed grant agreement is the authorizing document. Unsuccessful applicants will also be notified that their application was not selected for an award and will be afforded an opportunity to request a debriefing on the unsuccessful application according to the procedures outlined in the SuperNOFA.

2. Negotiation. Refer to the General Section of the SuperNOFA for additional details.

3. Adjustments to Funding. Refer to the General Section of the SuperNOFA for additional details.

4. Performance and Compliance Actions of Funding Recipients. HUD will measure and address the performance and compliance actions of funding recipients in accordance with the applicable standards and sanctions of their respective programs.

B. Administrative and National Policy Requirements

1. Environmental Requirements: Certain activities assisted under this program may be subject to HUD environmental review to the extent required under 24 CFR part 50. An award under the Lead Elimination Action Program (LEAP) does not constitute approval of specific sites where activities that are subject to environmental review may be carried out. Following grant award execution, HUD will be responsible for ensuring that any necessary environmental reviews are completed. You may not rehabilitate, convert, or repair property, or commit or expend grant funds or HUD-leveraged funds for any eligible property until you receive written notification from the appropriate HUD official that completed its environmental review and the property has been approved. The results of the environmental reviews may require that proposed activities be modified or proposed sites rejected. For assistance, contact Karen Choi, the Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control Environmental Officer at (213) 894-8000, extension 3015 (this is not a toll-free number) or the HUD Environmental Review Officer in the HUD field office serving your area. If you are a hearing- or speech-impaired person, you may reach the telephone number via TTY by calling the toll-free Federal Information Relay Service at 800-877-8339. Recipients of a grant under this funded program will be given additional guidance in these responsibilities.

2. HUD Reform Act. Applicants must comply with the requirements for funding competitions established by the HUD Reform Act of 1989 (42 U.S.C. 3531 et seq.) as defined in the General Section of the SuperNOFA.

3. Other Requirements. Please review the General Section of the SuperNOFA for information on Statutory and Regulatory Requirements, Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing, Economic Opportunities for Low- and Very Low-Income Persons (Section 3), ensuring the Participation of Small Businesses, Small Disadvantaged Businesses, and Woman-Owned Businesses, OMB Circulars and Governmentwide Regulations Applicable to Financial Assistance Programs, Conflicts of Interest, Prohibition Against Lobbying Activities, Accessible Technology, Improving Access to Services for Persons with Limited English Proficiency, Compliance with Fair Housing and Civil Rights Laws, and Executive Orders pertaining to this NOFA.

a. Participation in HUD-Sponsored Program Evaluation. As a condition of the receipt of financial assistance under this NOFA all successful applicants will be required to cooperate with all HUD staff or contractors performing HUD funded research and evaluation studies.

C. Reporting

Successful applicants will be required to submit quarterly, annual, and final program and financial reports according to the requirements of the Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control. Specific guidance and additional details will be provided to successful applicants.

VII. Agency Contact(s) Back to Top

1. For Further Information and Technical Assistance: You may contact Linda J. Ciancio, Acting Director, Program Management and Assurance Division, Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control; 451 7th Street, SW., Washington, DC 20410. Or by telephone, fax, or email: telephone (202) 755-1785, extension 112 (this is not a toll-free number); if you are a hearing- or speech-impaired person, you may reach the above telephone number via TTY by calling the toll-free Federal Information Relay Service at 800-877-8339; fax: (202) 755-1000; or e-mail: Linda_J._Ciancio@hud.gov.

VIII. Other Information Back to Top

Refer to the General Section of the SuperNOFA for details regarding other information on submitting application that meets HUD requirements.

A. Paperwork Reduction Act

The information collection requirements contained in this document have been approved by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501-3520) and assigned OMB control number 2539-0015. In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act, HUD may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to, a collection of information unless the collection displays a currently valid OMB control number. Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 80 hours per application and 16 hours per grant award. This includes the time for collecting, reviewing, and reporting the data. The information will be used for grantee selection monitoring the administration of funds. Response to this request for information is required in order to receive the benefits to be derived.

B. Other Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control Information

For additional general, technical, and grant program information pertaining to the Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control, visit: http://www.hud.gov/offices/lead.

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Brownfields Economic Development Initiative (BEDI) Back to Top

Overview Information Back to Top

A. Federal Agency Name: Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Community Planning and Development.

B. Funding Opportunity Title: Brownfields Economic Development Initiative.

C. Announcement Type: Initial announcement.

D. Funding Opportunity Number: The Federal Register number is FR-4900-N-07. The OMB approval number is 2506-0153.

E. Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number(s): Brownfields Economic Development Initiative (BEDI), 14.246.

F. Dates: The application due date is July 15, 2004.

G. Optional, Additional Overview Content Information:

BEDI funds are used to enhance the security of a loan guaranteed by HUD under section 108 of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, as amended, for the same brownfields economic development project, or to improve the viability of a brownfields economic development project financed with the section 108-guaranteed loan, in order to stimulate economic development by local governments and private sector parties at brownfields sites and to return those sites to productive, economic reuse. All BEDI grants must be used in conjunction with a new section 108-guaranteed loan commitment.

HUD encourages brownfields economic development projects that propose the redevelopment of a brownfields site through new investments by identified private sector parties and that will directly result in new business or job creation, increases in the local tax base or other near-term, measurable economic benefits.

Those interested in applying for funding under this program should review carefully the General Section of the SuperNOFA and the following additional information.

Full Text of Announcement Back to Top

I. Funding Opportunity Description Back to Top

A. Authority

BEDI is authorized pursuant to section 108(q), Title I, Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, as amended, (42 U.S.C. 5301); 24 CFR part 570.

B. Program Description

BEDI is designed to help local governments redevelop brownfields, defined in this NOFA as abandoned, idled, or underutilized real property, including industrial and commercial facilities, where expansion or redevelopment is complicated by the presence or potential presence of environmental contamination. A BEDI grant award will be conditioned upon, and must be used in conjunction with, a new (i.e., not previously approved) section 108-guaranteed loan commitment. Both section 108 loan guarantee proceeds and BEDI grant funds are initially made available by HUD to units of general local government eligible for assistance under HUD's Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program (specifically, the Entitlement and State programs and for certain jurisdictions in the state of Hawaii, the Small Cities program). A local government may re-loan the section 108 loan proceeds and provide BEDI funds to a business or other public entity eligible to carry out a specific approved brownfields economic development project, or the public entity may carry out the eligible project itself, as provided in the approved application. In either case, BEDI grant funds and the 108 proceeds must be used to support the same eligible BEDI project.

Under this program, communities (and states, as applicable) pledge their continuing CDBG allocations as security for the section 108 loans guaranteed by HUD. BEDI grant funds are intended to reduce grantees' potential loss of future CDBG allocations by:

1. Strengthening the economic feasibility of a project financed with section 108 funds (and thereby increasing the probability that the project will generate enough cash to repay the guaranteed loan);

2. Directly enhancing the security of the section 108-guaranteed loan; or

3. Employing a combination of these or other risk mitigation techniques.BEDI funds are to be used as the stimulus for local governments and private sector parties to commence redevelopment or continue phased redevelopment efforts of brownfields sites where contamination is present or potentially present and a redevelopment plan exists. HUD desires to see BEDI and section 108 funds used to finance projects and activities that involve investment in the brownfields site by an identified private sector party and that will provide near-term results and measurable economic benefits, such as job creation and increases in the local tax base.

C. Program Definitions

Unless otherwise defined herein, terms defined in this NOFA shall have the same respective meanings as provided for in 24 CFR part 570.

Act means Title I, Housing and Community Development Act of 1974 (42 U.S.C. 5301 et seq.).

Application means a single set of documents, including a request for Section 108 loan guarantee assistance, submitted by an eligible applicant for BEDI grant funds, in accordance with the provisions of this NOFA to finance a brownfields economic development project. Section IV.B.1(e) of this NOFA provides additional information on the nature and forms of section 108 loan guarantee requests that must accompany each BEDI application.

Brownfields means abandoned, idled, or under-used real property (including industrial and commercial facilities) where expansion or redevelopment is complicated by the presence or potential presence of contamination.

Brownfields Economic Development Initiative (BEDI) funds means the appropriated funds made available for the competition under this NOFA from any available appropriation.

Brownfields Economic Development Initiative (BEDI) project or brownfields economic development project means an activity or activities (including mixed use projects with housing components) that are eligible under section 108(q) of the Act and under 24 CFR 570.703, and that will increase economic opportunity for persons of low- and moderate-income, stimulate or retain businesses or jobs, or otherwise lead to near-term, measurable economic benefits in connection with brownfields redevelopment.

CDBG funds means those funds collectively so defined at 24 CFR 570.3, including grant funds received pursuant to section 108(q) and this NOFA.

Economic Development Initiative (EDI) grant means the provision of economic development grant assistance under Section 108(q) of the Act, as authorized by section 232 of the Multifamily Housing Property Disposition Reform Act of 1994 (103, approved April 11, 1994).

EPA means the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Firm Commitment means either a written agreement or letter of understanding by which an applicant or a third party:

(1) Agrees to perform an activity or provide resources as specified in the application, and demonstrates their relationship to the proposed BEDI/Section 108 project;

(2) Specifies the dollar value of the commitment and demonstrates that it has the financial and organizational capacity to deliver the resources necessary to successfully complete the activity; and

(3) Irrevocably commits the resources to the activity either through cash or in-kind services or contributions; if any portion is to be financed through a grant or loan from another public or private organization, that institution's grant or loan commitment must be firmly committed as well.

Any such agreement or letter of understanding shall be understood as being contingent upon receipt of the BEDI grant. Funds expended prior to the submission of the BEDI application will not be considered as firmly committed funds for purposes of this NOFA.

Additional information related to firm commitments of other resources is provided in Section V.A.1 of this NOFA, Rating Factor 4 (Leveraging of Other Financial Resources).

Showcase Community means an applicant chosen by the federal government's Brownfields National Partnership for inclusion in the federal government's Brownfields Showcase Communities program. A list of the federally designated Brownfield Showcase Communities is provided in Appendix B in Section VIII of this NOFA and is also available from the SuperNOFA Information Center or through the HUD Web site, http://www.hud.gov.

Strategic Plan means a strategy or course of action developed and agreed to by the nominating local government(s) and state(s) and submitted in partial fulfillment of the application requirements for an Empowerment Zone, Enterprise Community, or a Renewal Community, designated pursuant to 24 CFR parts 597, 598 or 599.

D. Program Background

HUD has multiple programs that are intended to stimulate economic and community development and promote economic revitalization of distressed areas, and which can be effectively employed to address and remedy brownfields conditions. Primary among HUD's resources are the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program and the section 108 loan guarantee program.

1. CDBG. The CDBG program provides grant funds by formula to local governments (either directly or through states) to carry out community and economic development activities ($4.338 billion appropriated in FY2004). The section 108 loan guarantee program provides CDBG-eligible communities with a source of financing for economic development, public facilities, and other eligible large-scale physical development projects. HUD is authorized pursuant to section 108 to guarantee notes issued by CDBG entitlement communities and non-entitlement units of general local government eligible to receive funds under the CDBG States' program, as well as certain non-entitlement units of general local government in the state of Hawaii funded under 24 CFR part 570, subpart F. The section 108 program is subject to the regulations applicable to the CDBG program at 24 CFR part 570 as described in 24 CFR part 570, subpart M. BEDI grants must support section 108 loan guarantees as generally described in this NOFA.

2. Section 108 Loan Guarantees. For FY2004, the loan guarantee authority for the section 108 program is estimated at $510,337,000 including $236,960,000 in loan guarantee authority that will continue be to available in FY2004 under the FY2003 appropriation and $273,377,000 in loan guarantee authority for FY2004. The full faith and credit of the United States is pledged to the payment of all guarantees made under section 108. Under this program, communities (and states, as applicable) are required to pledge their continuing CDBG allocations as security for loans guaranteed by HUD. The section 108 program, however, does not require CDBG funds to be escrowed for loan repayment (unless such an arrangement is specifically negotiated as loan security and included in the applicable “Contract for Loan Guarantee Assistance”). This means that a community can ordinarily continue to spend its existing allocation for other CDBG purposes, unless needed for loan repayment.

3. Additional Security for Section 108 Loan Guarantees. Applicants should be aware of the need to provide additional security for the section 108 loan guarantee pursuant to 24 CFR 570.705(b)(3). Although a public entity is required by the Act to pledge its current and future CDBG allocations as security for the section 108 loan guarantee, it will usually be required to furnish additional collateral. In most cases, the additional collateral consists (in whole or in part) of the asset financed with the section 108 loan funds (e.g., a loan made to a business as part of an economic development project and the related mortgage from the business). Applications proposing uses for BEDI funding that directly enhance the value of the assets securing the section 108 loan will help ensure that the project-based asset(s) will satisfy the additional collateral requirements.

4. Integration of Other Government Economic Development and Brownfields Programs. HUD encourages local governments which are assisted by (a) other Federal or State economic development programs, (b) other Federal brownfields programs (e.g., the federal Brownfields Showcase Community program, EPA's Assessment, Revolving Loan Fund Cleanup or Grant programs), or (c) State-supported brownfields programs, to integrate efforts arising from those programs in developing projects for assistance under HUD's BEDI and section 108 programs. Applicants should elaborate upon these ties in their response to the rating factors, where appropriate in section V.A.1 of this NOFA (e.g., “Capacity of the Applicant,” “Soundness of Approach,” or “Leveraging Resources”—Rating Factors 1, 3, and 4 respectively.)

II. Award Information Back to Top

A. Available Funds

HUD has available approximately, $25,352,500 for grant awards under this

BEDI NOFA. This amount consists of $24,725,130 in appropriations under the “Brownfields Redevelopment” heading in the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2004 (Pub. L. 108-199, approved January 23, 2004, referred to as the FY2004 Appropriations Act); $127,370 of unobligated appropriated funds from the FY2003 HUD Appropriations Act (Pub. L. 108-7, approved February 20, 2003) under the “Brownfields Redevelopment” heading; and $500,000 of unobligated appropriated funds from the FY2001 HUD Appropriations Act (Pub. L. 106-377, approved October 27, 2000) under the “Brownfields” Redevelopment heading. All such funds are authorized by section 108(q) of the Act (as described above). If any additional funds become available for the BEDI program during FY2004, including through the deobligation and recapture of previous BEDI awards, HUD may either fund additional applicants in accordance with this NOFA, or may add these funds to funds available for future competitions pursuant to section 108(q) of the Act.

B. Maximum Award

The maximum amount of a BEDI award under this competition is $2 million per project. An application in excess of $2 million will be reduced to the extent HUD determines that such a reduction is appropriate and the project remains feasible.

C. Limitations on Grant Amounts

1. HUD expects to approve BEDI grant amounts for approvable applications with a range of ratios of BEDI grant funds awarded to new section 108 loan guarantee commitments for the same project, but the minimum ratio must be $1.00 of section 108 loan guarantee commitments for every $1.00 of BEDI grant funds in order to receive consideration for funding. Section V.A.1, Rating Factor 4 (Leveraging of Resources), provides additional information on the required ratio of BEDI to section 108 funds.

2. After selection, but prior to grant award, if HUD determines that an application can be funded at a lesser BEDI grant amount than requested and still be feasible and consistent with the proposed plan and the purposes of the Act, it reserves the right to reduce the amount of the BEDI award and/or increase the required section 108 loan guarantee commitment.

3. In the event a BEDI grant is awarded and has been reduced below the original request (e.g., the application contained some activities that were ineligible, exceeded the $2 million cap, or there were insufficient funds to fund the last competitive application at the full amount requested), the applicant will be required to modify the project plans and application to conform to the terms of HUD approval before HUD will execute a grant agreement.

4. HUD also may proportionately reduce or deobligate the BEDI award if a grantee does not submit an approvable section 108 loan guarantee application, issue section 108-guaranteed obligations and receive loan guarantee proceeds on a timely basis (including any extension authorized by HUD) in the amount required by the BEDI/108 leveraging ratio, which will be approved by HUD as a special condition of the BEDI grant award (see section IV.B.1(e)(2) of this NOFA).

5. In the case of a requested increase in guarantee assistance for a project with a previously approved section 108 loan guarantee commitment (as further discussed in section IV.B.1(e)(4) below), the BEDI assistance approved will be based only on the additional amount of section 108 loan guarantee assistance requested.

III. Eligibility Information Back to Top

A. Eligible Applicants

Any public entity eligible to apply for section 108 loan guarantee assistance in accordance with 24 CFR 570.702 may apply for BEDI grant assistance under section 108(q). Eligible applicants are CDBG entitlement units of general local government and non-entitlement units of general local government eligible to receive loan guarantees under 24 CFR part 570, subpart M. Urban Counties, as defined at 24 CFR 570.3 and 570.307, are eligible applicants for BEDI funds; units of general local government that participate in an Urban County program are not independently eligible applicants. For non-entitlement applicants other than those subject to 24 CFR part 570, subpart F (which applies only to the state of Hawaii), applicants are required to provide evidence in the BEDI application from an authorized official of the state agency responsible for administering the State CDBG program stating that it supports the related section 108 loan with a pledge of its CDBG allocations pursuant to the requirements of 24 CFR 570.705(b)(2). Such evidence must be provided by form HUD-40122, titled “Section 108 Loan Guarantee: State Certifications Related to Nonentitlement Public Entities” included in section VIII of this NOFA, or which may be obtained by downloading from the Internet at http://www.grants.gov. Note that effective January 25, 1995, non-entitlement public entities in the state of Hawaii are authorized to apply to HUD for section 108 loans (see 59 FR 47510, December 27, 1994). Thus non-entitlement public entities in all 50 states and Puerto Rico are eligible to participate in the section 108 and BEDI programs, with assistance of the state's or commonwealth's pledge of CDBG allocations.

For application submission requirements, see section IV.B of this NOFA regarding mandatory submission requirements. See also section III.C of this NOFA regarding eligible and ineligible uses of grant funding.

B. Cost Sharing or Matching

As described further in section V.A.1 of this NOFA, under Rating Factor 4 (Leveraging of Resources), applications which evidence a greater level of other funds firmly committed to the BEDI project will receive more points under Rating Factor 4, to the extent consistent with the points available under Rating Factor 4. In addition, a BEDI grant is required to be used with at least an equal amount of section 108 loan guarantee proceeds for the same brownfields economic development project.

C. Other

1. Eligible Activities and National Objectives

a. BEDI grant funds and section 108 loan guarantee funds may be used for activities listed at 24 CFR 570.703, provided such activities are carried out as part of a BEDI project as described in this NOFA and meet the CDBG requirements at 24 CFR 570.200. Applicants are required to submit applications that seek funding for BEDI projects that will contribute to the redevelopment and revitalization of brownfields. Applications that fail to meet the threshold requirements found in section III.C.2 of the General Section of the SuperNOFA and the program requirements of this NOFA will not be rated, ranked, or otherwise considered by HUD.

b. Each activity assisted with section 108 loan guarantee or BEDI funds must meet a national objective of the CDBG program as described in 24 CFR 570.208. All applicants must clearly identify in their narrative statement (as described in section IV.B.1(c) of this NOFA) the CDBG national objective to be achieved by the proposed project and provide the appropriate CDBG national objective regulatory citation found at 24 CFR 570.208. Applicants must also address, when applicable, how the proposed activities will comply with the public benefit standards of the CDBG program as reflected in the regulation at 24 CFR 570.209.

c. A grantee's aggregate use of its CDBG funds, including any section 108 loan guarantee proceeds and section 108(q) (BEDI) funds provided pursuant to this NOFA, must comply with the CDBG primary objective requirements as described in section 101(c) of the Act and 24 CFR 570.200(a)(3) for entitlement grantees, or 570.484 in the case of a recipient under a State's program, requiring that, over the period of time specified in the applicant's CDBG certification, not less than 70 percent of the aggregate expenditures of CDBG funds be expended for activities benefiting low- and moderate-income persons under the criteria of 24 CFR 570.208(a) or 570.208(d)(5) or (6).

d. The following examples are offered only to illustrate some of the ways in which BEDI funds may be used to support section 108-guaranteed loans:

(1) Land Writedowns. Local governments may use a combination of section 108 and BEDI funds to acquire a brownfields site for purposes of reconveying the site to a private developer at a discount from its purchase price. This approach would provide the developer with an asset of enhanced value that could be used as collateral for other sources of funding and those other sources of financing could then be used to finance environmental remediation or other development costs. In such a circumstance, the level of BEDI assistance could approximate the difference between the original cost of the site and its remediation in comparison to the market value of the remediated property.

(2) Funding Reserves. The cash flow generated by an economic development project may be expected to be relatively “thin” in the early stages of the project, i.e., potentially insufficient to meet operating expenses and debt service obligations. The BEDI grant could be used by the grantee to either establish a debt service reserve held by a bank in a security account for the benefit of the grantee and HUD to cover interest on the section 108 loan, or as a grant to a business for working capital. In either case, the BEDI funds enhance the economic feasibility of the project.

(3) Provision of Financing to For-Profit Businesses at a Below Market Interest Rate. While the rates on loans guaranteed under section 108 are only slightly above the rates on comparable U.S. Treasury obligations, they may nonetheless be higher than can be afforded by businesses, non-profit groups or public entities in severely economically distressed neighborhoods. The BEDI grant can be used to make section 108 financing affordable by serving to “buy down” the interest rate up front, or make full or partial interest payments on the section 108 loan. This might increase the financial viability of the businesses or other entities in the early start-up period, which might not otherwise be possible with section 108 alone. This strategy would be particularly useful where a community was undertaking a large commercial or retail project in a brownfields area in order to act as a catalyst for other development in the area.

(4) Site Remediation Costs. Local governments may use BEDI funds in any of several ways to address site remediation costs. If the local government proposes to use section 108 funds to acquire real property, BEDI funds could be used to address assessment and site remediation costs as part of eligible demolition, clearance, or site preparation activities. If the local government uses section 108 funds to make a loan to a developer, BEDI funds could be granted or loaned to the developer for the purpose of addressing remediation costs as part of an economic development activity.

(5) Combination of Techniques. A combination of the above could be employed to implement a BEDI project successfully. BEDI is governed by Federal regulations applicable to the CDBG program and the section 108 Loan Guarantee program and this NOFA contains many specific references to those regulations. The full text of the CDBG and section 108 Loan Guarantee regulations can be accessed through the HUD Web site at www.hud.gov/offices/cpd/communitydevelopment/rulesandregs/regulations.

2. Ineligible Activities

Certain restrictions shall apply to the use of BEDI and section 108 funds, including those ineligible activities listed at 24 CFR 570.207 and those provided for in this NOFA:

a. BEDI grant funds must not be used as a resource immediately to repay the principal of a loan guaranteed under section 108. Repayment of principal is only permissible with BEDI grant funds as a matter of security if other sources projected for repayment of the principal prove to be unavailable.

b. Section 108 loan obligations may not be subordinated, directly or indirectly, to federally tax exempt obligations. Pursuant to Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-129 (Rev.) Appendix A, sections II.2.c. and d., (Policies for Federal Credit Programs and Non-Tax Receivables), section 108-guaranteed loan funds may not directly or indirectly support federally tax-exempt obligations.

c. BEDI grant funds shall not be used in any manner by grantees to provide public or private sector entities with funding to remediate conditions caused by their own actions, where the public entity (or other known prospective beneficiary of the proposed BEDI grant) has been determined responsible for causation and remediation by order of a court or a Federal, State, or local regulatory agency, or is responsible for the remediation as part of a settlement approved by such a court or agency. Applicants will be required in the BEDI Narrative Statement described in section IV.B.1(c) of this NOFA to indicate that the proposed BEDI project will not be used to provide assistance as prohibited herein.

d. Applicants may not propose projects on sites which are: (i) Listed or proposed to be listed on EPA's National Priority List (NPL); (ii) subject to unilateral administrative orders, court orders, administrative consent orders or judicial consent decrees issued or entered into by parties under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980, as amended (CERCLA); or (iii) subject to the jurisdiction, custody, or control of the United States Government. Applicants will be required in the BEDI Narrative Statement described above in section IV.B.1(c) of this NOFA to indicate that the proposed BEDI project will not be undertaken at an ineligible site as provided herein.

e. BEDI grant assistance cannot be used to leverage a section 108 loan guarantee approved prior to the date of HUD's announcement of a BEDI grant pursuant to this SuperNOFA, unless the applicant requests to deobligate previously approved commitment authority as provided in section IV.B.1(e)(5) of this NOFA. In no event, however, may a previously approved section 108 commitment to be used with a prior BEDI or EDI award be subject to such deobligation. In an instance where a pending application for section 108 assistance is to be leveraged by the proposed BEDI grant, the BEDI grant may be awarded before HUD approval of the section 108 commitment if HUD determines that such award will further the purposes of the Act.

f. A BEDI award will not be made if the section 108 request contained in the application (see section IV.B1(e) of this NOFA) calls for the use of the section 108-guaranteed obligation solely as security for other financing on the project.

3. Threshold Requirements

a. Applicants for BEDI grant funds must comply with the statutory, regulatory, threshold, and public policy requirements listed in the General Section of the SuperNOFA, except as otherwise specifically provided in this NOFA. In particular, applicants should carefully review those provisions that could result in the failure to receive funding, including the DUNS Number Requirement at section II.C.2(b) of the General Section of the SuperNOFA, provisions relating to Delinquent Federal Debts (Section II.C.2(e)), and the Name Check Review (section II.C.2(g)).

b. The maximum number of points to be awarded under this NOFA is 104. To be eligible for funding, a BEDI application must obtain a total score of at least 75 points. All applications meeting threshold requirements and BEDI program requirements will be rated under the selection criteria provided in section V.A.1 below.

4. Program Requirements

a. BEDI Funding Request. A single BEDI application must contain a request for funds for a single BEDI/108 project. An applicant may submit an additional application for each additional unrelated BEDI/108 project, but in no event will HUD rate and rank more than one BEDI project per application.

b. Related Section 108 Loan Guarantee Request. Each BEDI application must be accompanied by a request for new section 108 loan guarantee assistance as described in section IV.B.1(e) of this NOFA. The request for section 108 Loan Guarantee assistance must provide for a minimum ratio of $1.00 of requested section 108 loan guarantee commitments for every $1.00 of BEDI grant funds requested, or a higher ratio, as needed for the project.

c. CDBG National Objectives and Eligible Activities. Each BEDI application must include citations to the specific regulatory subsections supporting eligibility of activities and compliance with National Objectives (see section III.C.1 of this NOFA).

d. Nonentitlement Applications. Applications submitted by nonentitlement public entities must provide for the state or commonwealth's certification agreeing to pledge its CDBG allocations to receive funding consideration, as evidenced by form HUD-40122, available in section VIII of this NOFA.

e. Narrative Response to Rating Factors. Each BEDI application must provide narrative statements in response to each of the rating factors below in section V.A.1 of this NOFA.

f. Time Frame for Submission of Section 108 Applications. All applications for Section 108 Loan Guarantee Assistance required for approved BEDI projects must be submitted within 60 days of written notice of BEDI selection, as provided for in section IV.B.1(e)(2) of this NOFA.

g. HUD Environmental Requirements. Beginning with the submission of a BEDI application through and after HUD's award of BEDI grant funds, pursuant to 24 CFR 570.604, each project or activity assisted under this program is subject to the provisions of 24 CFR part 58. This includes limitations on the commitment of HUD and non-HUD funds by the BEDI grantee and section 108 public entity, as well as other participants in the development process, prior to the completion of environmental review, notification, and release of funds. No such assistance will be released by HUD until a request for release of funds is submitted and the requirements of 24 CFR part 58 have been met. All public entities, including non-entitlement public entities, shall submit the request for release of funds and related certification, required pursuant to 24 CFR part 58, to the appropriate HUD field office for each project to be assisted.

h. Compliance with Environmental and Other Laws. An award of BEDI funding does not, in any way, relieve the applicant or third party users of BEDI funds from compliance with all applicable Federal, State, and local laws and regulations, particularly those addressing the environment. Applicants are further advised that HUD may require evidence that any project involving remediation has been or will be carried out in accordance with applicable law, including voluntary clean up programs.

i. CDBG Program Regulations. In addition to 24 CFR 570.701 (Definitions), 570.702 (Eligible applicants), and 570.703 (Eligible activities), the CDBG regulatory requirements cited in 24 CFR 570.707, including subparts J (Grant Administration), K (Other Program Requirements), and O (Performance Reviews), also govern the use of BEDI funds, as applicable.

j. Obligation to Affirmatively Further Fair Housing. All BEDI grantees are obliged to affirmatively further fair housing, even when the proposed activities do not appear to be directly related to housing. Therefore, applicants that propose to use BEDI funds must include in their applications an explanation of how they propose to further fair housing opportunities for persons on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, familial status, or disability. Applicants should respond to this requirement in section V.A.1, of this NOFA, under Rating Factor 3, subfactor (1)(c). Affirmative activities include, but are not limited to: initial and periodic assessments of the extent to which affordable and accessible housing opportunities are provided or denied to persons by race, color, national origin, sex, religion, familial status, or disability; outreach to persons in underserved population groups or advocacy organizations representing such persons; affirmative fair marketing of job or housing opportunities; furthering housing choice; addressing environmental justice concerns; or ensuring that employment, housing and other benefits of the BEDI grant are made available to those individuals and families living at or near the brownfields site prior to its redevelopment.

k. Policy Priorities. Applicants are reminded of the Department's Policy Priorities for FY2004 found in section V.B.2 General Section of the SuperNOFA, several of which apply to this NOFA, as described in section V.A.1 below, under Rating Factor 5 (Achieving Results and Program Evaluation).

IV. Application and Submission Information Back to Top

A. Addresses to Request Application Package

1. For All Applicants. All information and forms necessary to complete and submit a valid application are contained in the General Section and this NOFA, and the appendices to the General Section and this NOFA. Copies of the NOFA and forms are also available on the Internet through the Web site http://www.grants.gov.

2. Further Information. Applicants may request general information and copies of the General Section and Program NOFAs of the SuperNOFA from the SuperNOFA Information Center (800-HUD-8929 or 800-HUD-2209 (TTY)) between the hours of 9 a.m. and 8 p.m. (eastern time) Monday through Friday, except on federal holidays. When requesting information, please refer to the name of the program that is of interest. Those requesting information should be sure to provide their name, address (including zip code), and telephone number (including area code). To ensure sufficient time to prepare an application, requests for copies of this SuperNOFA can be made immediately following publication of the SuperNOFA. The SuperNOFA Information Center opens for business simultaneously with the publication of the SuperNOFA. Application and other information on the SuperNOFA can also be obtained and downloaded through the Web site www.grants.gov.

3. Satellite Broadcasts. HUD will hold informational broadcasts via satellite for potential applicants to learn more about the BEDI program and the preparation of BEDI application(s). For more information about the date and time of the broadcast, consult the Web site http://www.hud.gov.

B. Content and Form of Application Submission

1. Content of Application

A complete application for a BEDI grant under this NOFA must contain the following items listed below to be complete. The standard forms, certifications, and assurances, which are required for the BEDI application (and listed in section IV.B.2 below) can be found in the General Section of the SuperNOFA. The remaining application items that are forms (i.e., excluding such items as narratives or letters, etc.), referred to as the “non-standard forms”, can be found in section VIII of this NOFA.

a. Transmittal Letter signed by the authorized representative of the eligible applicant indicating that it is submitting the application for funding under the Brownfields Economic Development Initiative Program and is requesting funding consideration for a BEDI project.

b. Checklist and Submission Table of Contents indicating the page numbers where the submission items can be found in the application (form HUD-40076-A EDI/BEDI).

c. BEDI Narrative Statement (not to exceed three double-spaced, 81/2× 11 inch pages, with one inch margins, combined) describing BEDI-funded eligible activities within the proposed project and indicating that funding will not be used for a prohibited purpose and that the proposed site for the project as described in paragraph (3) below, is not ineligible under the BEDI program. The BEDI narrative statement should:

(1) Describe the activities that will be carried out with the BEDI grant funds, and explain the nature and extent of the brownfields problem(s) actually or potentially affecting the site and/or structure(s) already on the site;

(2) Describe how the proposed uses of BEDI funds will qualify as eligible activities under 24 CFR 570.703 and meet the National Objectives under 24 CFR 570.208 of the CDBG program. In describing how the proposed uses will meet the National Objectives of the CDBG program and the activity eligibility requirements of the section 108 program, applications must also include citations to the specific regulatory subsections supporting eligibility of activities and compliance with National Objectives. (See Section III.C.1 of this NOFA) and;

(3) Indicate that:

(a) the proposed assistance will not be used to provide funding to parties to remediate conditions caused by their own actions for which they have been determined to be legally responsible, as specified in section III.C.2(c) of this NOFA; and

(b) that the proposed brownfields site is not ineligible as provided in Section III.C.2(d) of this NOFA.

d. EDI/BEDI/Section 108 Funding Eligibility Statement. A completed EDI/BEDI section 108 Funding Eligibility Statement (form HUD-40076-E EDI/BEDI).

e. Request for Loan Guarantee Assistance. A request for loan guarantee assistance under Section 108, as further described below. Full application requirements for the section 108 program are found at 24 CFR 570.704. Nonentitlement applicants must accompany this request with the State Certifications Related to Nonentitlement Public Entities (form HUD-40122) in order to be considered for BEDI funding.

The request for loan guarantee assistance may take any of the five forms defined in paragraphs (1), (2), (3), (4) or (5) below. Notwithstanding the form of the request for new section 108 loan guarantee assistance, the applicant must include citations to the specific regulatory subsection supporting activity eligibility and National Objectives compliance for the section 108 funds described in the application. (See section III.C.1 of this NOFA.) Both the BEDI and section 108 funds must be used in conjunction with the same BEDI project. The request for new section 108 guarantee assistance may be presented through a:

(1) Concurrent Application. A complete application for new section 108 loan guarantee(s), including the documents listed at 24 CFR 570.704(b). Any full application must also be submitted to the appropriate HUD field office concurrently with its submission to Headquarters. As described further in section V.A.1, in Rating Factor 3 (Soundness of Approach), two points will be awarded for the submission of a full section 108 loan guarantee application with a BEDI application.

(2) Subsequent Application. A brief description (not to exceed three pages) of the project to be applied for in a subsequent new section 108 loan guarantee application(s). Such a 108 application(s) shall be submitted within 60 days of written notice of BEDI selection, with HUD reserving the right to extend such period on a case-by-case basis where HUD determines there is evidence of good cause. BEDI awards will be conditioned on approval of actual section 108 loan commitments and loan guarantee proceeds in a specific ratio of BEDI funds to section 108 funds as approved by HUD in the BEDI award. The description provided in the BEDI application must be sufficient to support the basic eligibility of the proposed project and activities for section 108 assistance. (See section III.C.1 of this NOFA.)

(3) Pending, Unapproved Application. A copy of a pending, unapproved section 108 loan guarantee application, and any proposed amendments to the section 108 application which are related to the BEDI application. The applicant's submission of such a BEDI/section 108 application shall be deemed by HUD to constitute a request to suspend separate processing of the section 108 application. The section 108 application will not be approved until on or after the date of the related BEDI award.

(4) Increase to a Project Assisted Under a Previously Approved Application. A request for section 108 loan guarantee assistance (analogous to section IV.B.1(e)(1) or (2) above of this section) that proposes to increase the amount of section 108 assistance for a project assisted under a previously approved section 108 application. However, any amount of section 108 loan guarantee authority approved before HUD's announcement of a BEDI grant for the same project is not eligible to be used in conjunction with a BEDI grant under this NOFA.

(5) Deobligation of Previously Approved section 108 Authority. A request to deobligate a previous commitment of section 108 loan guarantee authority to the applicant that is no longer to be used by the applicant (except for an amount required as a condition of a previously approved BEDI or EDI award), combined with a new request or application for section 108 loan guarantee assistance. Such request or application may either be a full application as provided for in paragraph (1) above or a request for 108 assistance submitted within 60 days as provided for in paragraph (2) above.

(6) In no event may a section 108 loan guarantee amount that is required to be used in conjunction with a previously approved BEDI or EDI grant award as of the date of the submission of the application, whether or not the section 108 loan guarantee has been approved as of the date of this SuperNOFA, be used in conjunction with a new BEDI award under this SuperNOFA. For example, if a public entity has a previously approved section 108 loan guarantee commitment of $12 million, even if none of the funds have been utilized, or if the public entity had previously been awarded a BEDI grant of $1 million and had agreed to submit a section 108 loan application for $10 million in support of that BEDI grant, the public entity's application under this NOFA must propose to increase the amount of its total section 108 loan guarantee commitments beyond those amounts to which it has previously agreed. (i.e., the $12 million or $10 million section 108 loan guarantee commitments in this example).

f. Narrative Responses to Factors for Award (not to exceed 15 double-spaced, 81/2× 11 inch pages, with one inch margins, combined):

(1) Rating Factor 1: Capacity and Relevant Organizational Experience. Provide a narrative indicating the capacity of the applicant's organization and staff and any known third parties to perform the work for which it is requesting funding.

(2) Rating Factor 2: Need Statement Identifying the level of Distress/Extent of the Problem. Provide a narrative statement including any documentation supporting the statement of need, accompanied by a completed form HUD-40076-B EDI/BEDI.

(3) Rating Factor 3: Soundness of Approach. Include the activities, budget and time frame for conducting activities and providing project benefits in the narrative response, accompanied by Form HUD-40076-C EDI/BEDI.

(4) Rating Factor 4: Leveraging Resources. The response must include a completed copy of Form HUD-40076-D EDI/BEDI, “Rating Factor 4: Leveraging Resources—Sources and Uses Statement,” accompanied by any letters of firm commitment as defined in Section I.C of this NOFA.

(5) Rating Factor 5: Achieving Results and Program Evaluation: Provide a narrative response to this factor, accompanied by the logic model provided in the General Section of the SuperNOFA (form HUD-96010).

2. Forms, Certifications, and Assurances

a. In addition to any forms that have been submitted in response to Section IV.B.1 above (which may be found in Section VIII of this NOFA), the following forms and certifications must also be submitted in accordance with the General Section of the SuperNOFA and may be found in the General Section of the SuperNOFA:

(1) Application for Federal Assistance (SF-424);

(2) Applicant Assurances and Certifications (HUD-424-B);

(3) Applicant/Recipient Disclosure/Update Report, HUD-2880; and, if applicable,

(4) Certification of Consistency With EZ/EC Strategic Plan, HUD-2990.

If an applicant wishes to receive an acknowledgment of HUD's receipt of its application it should submit a completed Acknowledgment of Receipt of Application form (HUD-2993).

BILLING CODE 4210-32-P

BILLING CODE 4210-32-C

In addition, within 30 days after the due date for this NOFA applicants are invited, on a voluntary basis, to submit duplicate applications via the use of http://www.grants.gov. For FY2004 BEDI applications, use of http://www.grants.gov/apply is strictly voluntary and intended to help HUD test the system to ensure that future applications can be received at HUD without problems and also to help applicants become familiar with the use of the system. It is HUD's intent to move to electronic submissions in FY2005 and beyond. Applicants can help HUD in its planning by voluntarily submitting applications electronically within 30 days after the submission of paper copies of the application by the due date and time per the mailing instructions in this NOFA and the General Section of the SuperNOFA.

C. Submission Dates and Times

1. Application Due Date

Please submit your completed applications (one original and three copies) on or before July 15, 2004, to the addresses shown below. Applications must be postmarked on or before midnight eastern time of July 15, 2004, and be received within 15 days of such date in order to be considered.

2. Proof of Timely Submission

Please see the General Section of the SuperNOFA for information regarding proof of timely submission.

D. Intergovernmental Review

BEDI is not subject to the provisions of Executive Order 12372, “Intergovernmental Review of Federal Programs.”

E. Funding Restrictions

BEDI grant funds and Section 108 loan guarantee funds may be used only for activities listed at 24 CFR 570.703, provided such activities are carried out as part of a BEDI project as described in this NOFA and meet the CDBG requirements at 24 CFR 570.200, 570.207, 570.208 and 570.209.

F. Other Submission Requirements

1. Address for Submitting Applications

a. Applications to HUD Headquarters. Submit the completed application (an original and two copies) by mail or permitted delivery service to: HUD Headquarters; Robert C. Weaver Federal Building; 451 Seventh Street, SW., Room 7251; Washington, DC 20410, Attention: BEDI.

When submitting the application, please specify BEDI on any label or mailing container, and include the applicant's name, mailing address (including ZIP code), street address (if different from mailing address), and ZIP code, and voice and facsimile telephone numbers (including area code), along with the contact person's name, and voice and facsimile telephone numbers (including area code), and email address, if available.

b. Applications to HUD Field Offices. At the same time the application and copies are submitted to HUD Headquarters, an additional copy should be submitted to the Community Planning and Development Division of the appropriate HUD field office for the applicant's jurisdiction. HUD strongly suggests that applications submitted to HUD field offices be mailed via the United States Postal Service, as access by other delivery services cannot be guaranteed.

2. Application Submission Procedures

See the General Section of the SuperNOFA for specific procedures governing the submission and receipt of applications.

V. Application Review Information Back to Top

A. Criteria

1. Factors for Award Used To Evaluate and Rate Applications

a. Response to Factors for Award. The applicant must provide in narrative form responses to each of the rating factors below. HUD will evaluate all applications for funding assistance based on the following factors, the responses to which demonstrate the quality of the proposed project or activities, and the applicant's capacity and commitment to use the BEDI funds in accordance with the purposes of the Act.

b. Responses to Rating Factors 1-5. Responses to Rating Factors 1-5 below shall not exceed 15 double-spaced, 81/2× 11 inch pages, with one-inch margins, combined.

Rating Factor 1: Capacity of the Applicant and Relevant Organizational Experience (20 Points Maximum)

This Factor addresses the extent to which the applicant has the organizational resources necessary to successfully implement the proposed activities in a timely manner. The rating of the “applicant” or the “applicant's organization and staff” will include any subcontractors, consultants, and sub-recipients that are firmly committed (see definition in section I.C above) to participate in the activities described in the application. In responding to subfactors (1) and (2) of this Factor, applications that merely summarize the amount of funds received, spent, or managed will receive fewer points than those providing specific measurable information on program activities undertaken, outcomes of these activities and their accomplishments. In rating this Factor, HUD will consider the following:

(1) Applicant Capacity (Up to 10 points). The applicant should demonstrate that it has the organization, the staff, and the financial resources in place to implement the specific steps required to successfully carry out its proposed BEDI/Section 108 project. The applicant should offer evidence of this capacity through a description that includes:

(a) Performance in the administration of its CDBG, HOME, or other HUD programs, including a description of successfully completed projects and other outcomes or accomplishments under these programs. In addition to citing specific projects, outcomes, or accomplishments, CDBG entitlement recipients must also indicate the extent to which the applicant has met the HUD standard that the total amount of its undisbursed entitlement grant funds may not be more than 1.5 times the entitlement grant amount for the current program year (see 24 CFR 570.902(a)(1)(i)).

(b) Performance, if any, in carrying out economic development projects similar to that proposed, including brownfields economic development or redevelopment projects, if any, and if applicable, the ability to conduct prudent underwriting;

(c) If applicable because the applicant has such designation, the capacity to achieve state and local commitments identified in its local implementation plan, including maximizing the federal tax benefits made available as a result of a federal Renewal Community/Empowerment Zone/Enterprise Community designation (including Enhanced Enterprise Community (EEC) designation). Applicants that have been designated as a Renewal Community (RC), Empowerment Zone (EZ), or Enterprise Community (EC/EEC) must respond to this subfactor even if the proposed brownfields economic development project is not to be located within the boundaries of the designated RC/EZ/EC; and

(d) An applicant that has previously received a BEDI or a competitive EDI grant award or, within the past five years, a section 108-guaranteed loan commitment, must describe the status of the implementation of those project(s) assisted with any BEDI or competitive EDI funds or with any section 108-guaranteed loan funds so approved within the last five years. An applicant must address any delays that have been encountered and the actions it is taking to overcome any such delays in carrying out the project(s) in a timely manner. For any such previously funded BEDI or competitive EDI grant projects, or for those section 108-guaranteed loan projects committed within the past five years, HUD will award more rating points for applications providing evidence of achievement of specific measurable outcomes in carrying out approved activities funded with such guaranteed loan or grant funds.

If any of the rating criteria listed under (a) through (d) above do not apply to an application, the rating for this subfactor (1) shall be based solely upon the other applicable criteria.

(2) Partner Capacity (Up to 10 points). In response to this subfactor (2), the applicant should describe the experience and performance of subrecipients, private developers and other businesses, nonprofit organizations (including grassroots faith-based and other community-based organizations), and other entities, if any, that have a role in implementing the proposed BEDI/108 program. Applicants are encouraged to identify specific economic development or other projects undertaken by each entity, which reflect the capacity of each entity to fulfill its responsibilities under the proposed brownfields economic development project, including the location, scale, and timeframe for completion of other relevant projects. If there are no third parties participating with the applicant in the proposed project, the 10 points available under this subfactor (2) will be added to the 10 points available under subfactor (1), with a maximum of 20 possible points then available under subfactor (1).

Experience will be judged in terms of recent (i.e., within the past 5 years) and successful performance of activities relevant to those proposed in the BEDI application. The more recent and extensive the experience, the greater the number of points that will be awarded for this Factor.

In addition to the application, HUD also may rely on information at hand or available from public sources such as newspapers, from performance and/or monitoring reports, Inspector General or Government Accounting Office reports or findings, hotline complaints that have been proven to have merit, audit reports, and other reliable public information in rating this Factor.

Rating Factor 2: Distress/Extent of the Problem (15 Points Maximum)

This Factor addresses the extent to which there is need for funding the proposed activities based on levels of distress in both the jurisdiction of the public entity that is the applicant and the geographic or target area that will benefit from the project. Applications will be evaluated on the extent to which the level of distress for the target area is documented and compared with national data and data for the jurisdiction.

(1) In applying this Factor, HUD will consider current levels of distress in the target area, as defined in standard geographic terms by the applicant. This may be Census Tract(s) or Block Groups immediately surrounding the project site up to a radius of one-half mile, or it may be the target area to be served by the proposed project. HUD will also consider the current levels of distress in the applicant public entity's jurisdiction, if different from the target area. The applicant should describe the nature of the distress that the project is designed to address and the rationale for its definition of the area to be benefited. Examples of project beneficiaries may include: (a) Those receiving or using products or services produced by the project, and (b) those employed by the project.

To the extent that the applicant's Consolidated Plan, its Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing choice (AI), and/or its Anti-Poverty Strategy found therein identify the level of distress in the jurisdiction and the target area in which the project is to be carried out, references to such documents should be included in preparing the response to this Factor. Applications that fail to reference these sources will receive fewer points under this Factor.

Notwithstanding the above, an applicant proposing a project to be located outside the target area for which benefit is claimed could still receive points under this Factor if a clear rationale is provided linking the proposed project location and the benefits to be derived by persons living in the target area.

(2) Applicants should provide data that address the following specific indicators of distress:

(a) Poverty Rate (Up to 5 points). Data should be provided in both absolute and percentage form (i.e., whole numbers and percents) for both the target area and the applicant's jurisdiction as a whole; an application that compares the local poverty rate in the following manner to the national average at the time of submission will receive points under this section as follows:

(i) Less than the national average, but with a poverty rate in the target area that is greater than the applicant's jurisdiction: 2 points;

(ii) At least equal to, but less than twice, the national average: 3 points;

(iii) Twice or more the national average: 5 points.

(b) Unemployment Rate (Up to 5 points). An application that compares the local unemployment rate for the applicant's jurisdiction and the target area in the following manner to the national average at the time of submission will receive points under this Section as follows:

(i) Less than the national average, but with an unemployment rate in the target area that is greater than the applicant's jurisdiction: 2 points;

(ii) At least equal to, but less than twice, the national average: 3 points;

(iii) Twice or more the national average: 5 points.

(c) Other Indicators of Social and/or Economic Decline (Up to 5 points). Applicants should provide other indicators of social or economic decline that best capture the applicant's local situation. Examples that could be provided under this section include information demonstrating the target area and the jurisdiction's stagnant or falling tax base, including recent (within the last three years) commercial or industrial closings, downturns or layoffs; housing conditions, such as the number and percentage of substandard and/or overcrowded units; rent burden (defined as average housing cost divided by average income) for both the target area and jurisdiction; local crime statistics. The response to this subfactor (c) should paint a picture of the extent of need and distress in the target area and jurisdiction.

HUD requires use of sound and reliable data (e.g., U.S. Census data, state statistical reports, university studies/reports that are verifiable) to support distress levels cited in each application. A source for all information along with the publication or origination date must also be provided. Updated Census data are available as follows for the listed indicators:

Unemployment rate: Unemployment rates are estimated monthly for counties, with a two-month lag, while census tract unemployment rates are available through the 2000 U.S. Census;

Poverty rate: Poverty rates are provided through the 2000 U.S. Census and are estimated every two years, with a three-year lag. Census and other relevant data can be accessed through http://www.ffiec.gov. In rating applications under this Factor, HUD reserves the right to consider sources of available objective data other than, or in addition to, those provided by applicants, in order to compare such data to those provided by applicants.

Rating Factor 3: Soundness of Approach (35 Points Maximum)

This Factor addresses the quality and cost-effectiveness of the proposed plan for the brownfields economic development project. Applications that do not propose the productive reuse of a specific, identified site or sites and that do not result in near-term, measurable economic benefits, such as projects that involve only the preparation of a site for potential future reuse by an unidentified party, or the capitalization of a loan pool for loans to unidentified borrowers, will receive fewer points under this Factor. The relationship between the proposed site or sites, the proposed eligible activities and the community needs and purposes of the program funding must be clearly described, as set forth below, in order to receive points for this Factor. In rating this Factor, HUD will consider the following:

(1) Consistency/Appropriateness of Proposed Activities with Identified Needs (Up to 8 points). The applicant should address:

(a) The extent to which the proposed plan for use of BEDI grant/section 108-guaranteed loan funds will address the needs described in Rating Factor 2 above, regarding the distress and extent of the problem in the target area or area to be benefited and the long-term benefit for current residents of the target area. The applicant should provide a clear and quantified explanation of this relationship.

(b) How the project will achieve one of the National Objectives under the Community Development Block Grant program (see 24 CFR 570.208) and the eligible activities that will be carried out under 24 CFR 570.703, including citations to the specific regulatory subsections supporting eligibility of activities and compliance with National Objectives; and

(c) Any unmet needs identified in the jurisdiction's Consolidated Plan and pursuant to section III.C.4(j) of this NOFA, any impediments to fair housing identified in the jurisdiction's Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice, that will be directly addressed by the proposed project. In order to receive full points under this subfactor, applicants must address the unmet needs addressed in both its Consolidated Plan and in the Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice. See section III.C.4(j) of this NOFA for examples of general affirmative fair housing actions that may be undertaken to address a jurisdiction's Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice.

(2) Project Readiness (Up to 15 points). In responding to this subfactor (2), the applicant should demonstrate the extent to which the redevelopment plan for the brownfields site is logical, feasible, and likely to achieve its stated purpose and the extent to which the project will directly result in the productive reuse of the site and the delivery of near-term, measurable economic benefits. The applicant's response should demonstrate the extent to which the project is likely to be completed within a maximum of five years from the date of the BEDI award and will produce near-term, measurable economic benefits. Points for this subfactor will be awarded based upon the extent to which the following critical benchmarks for the redevelopment plan have been met or are approaching completion. The applicant's response to this subfactor should address:

(a) Environmental Investigation. This subfactor (a) will consider the extent to which the presence or potential presence of environmental contamination of the project site is known or understood. Proposed projects on sites where the nature and degree of environmental contamination is not well-quantified, where no environmental investigation has commenced, or that are the subject of on-going litigation or environmental enforcement actions will receive fewer points under this subfactor (a). Similarly, fewer points will be awarded to proposed projects at sites with exceptionally expensive contamination problems that may be beyond the scope of the BEDI and section 108 programs' financial resources or other resources firmly committed to the project as described in the application, and sites subject to pending and current litigation that may not be available for remediation and development or redevelopment in a time frame that will produce near-term and measurable economic benefits through the use of BEDI and section 108 funds. Alternatively, any applicant indicating the completion of environmental assessment or review and the issuance of HUD approval for a Request for Release of Funds for the project under 24 CFR part 58 will receive more points under this subfactor.

(b) Site Control. This subfactor (b) will consider the extent to which control of the proposed project site has been secured or is being sought. Points for this subfactor (b) will be awarded based upon the degree of site control secured by the applicant or its development partner. Projects, for instance, in which negotiation or litigation related to site control are underway or continuing will receive fewer points than projects in which an option to purchase has been secured. Projects in which the applicant or its development partner has secured site control through acquisition, eminent domain or other means at the time of application will receive full points under this subfactor (b). In responding to this subfactor (b), applicants are encouraged to accompany their narrative response with a map indicating the boundaries of the proposed site or sites on which BEDI-assisted improvements are proposed. Any map included by the applicant will not be counted in the fifteen page limitation on the narrative response to the Rating Factors as provided in section V.A.1(b) of this NOFA.

(c) Legislative, Regulatory, and Other Approvals. This subfactor (c) will consider the extent to which any required local legislative approvals, regulatory permits, zoning classifications, environmental regulatory approvals, waivers, general, and special use permits, assessment district designations, public easements or rights-of-way, or other similar approvals have been secured or are being sought. The greater the number of outstanding legislative, regulatory, or other approvals required and not yet secured, the fewer points will be awarded. In the case of a CDBG entitlement unit of general local government, such as a county, proposing to undertake a BEDI project within the jurisdiction of another CDBG entitlement unit of general local government, such as a city or other jurisdiction within that county, the applicant should also include a letter of support from the jurisdiction in which the BEDI project would be located.

(d) User Agreements. This subfactor (d) will consider the extent to which any development agreements, tenant leases, memoranda of understanding, or other agreements integral to returning the site to productive reuse and producing near-term measurable economic benefits, have been secured or are being sought. Applicants proposing projects that do not provide for new investment by an identified, committed private entity and the return of a brownfields site to productive reuse, with accompanying near-term, measurable economic benefits, will receive fewer points under this subfactor (d).

(e) Delivery of Economic Benefits. The response to this subfactor (e) must include the time frame in which the measurable economic benefits are to be delivered. For multi-phase projects, the response to this subfactor (e) must clearly delineate the different phases of the project and indicate whether or not they are to be funded by BEDI/section 108 funds. Brownfields economic development projects that provide near-term, measurable economic benefits directly through the creation or retention of jobs will receive a greater number of points under this subfactor (e). In response to this subfactor (2), the applicant should also provide a specific time schedule (with both beginning and end dates) for carrying out the project and identify all interim measurable benchmarks (acquisition, demolition, site improvements, relocation, construction, etc.) to be accomplished. The applicant should also include a proposed schedule for drawing down all funds necessary to complete the project, including BEDI and section 108 funds.

A timeline form is provided in Appendix A to this NOFA for the purpose of illustrating the project schedule (form HUD-40076-C EDI/BEDI), but HUD will consider the timeline form only as an illustration of the narrative response to this subfactor (e).

(3) Section 108 Application (Up to 2 points). BEDI applications accompanied by a request for new section 108 Loan Guarantee assistance as evidenced by a full and complete section 108 application will receive up to two points for this subfactor (3). BEDI applications accompanied by a copy of a currently pending but unapproved section 108 loan guarantee application for the same project described in the BEDI application will also receive up to two points under this subfactor (3).

(4) Financial Feasibility/Need (Up to 10 points). The applicant should demonstrate the economic necessity of the proposed BEDI and section 108 funds and the extent to which the project is not financially feasible in the absence of such funds. In responding to this subfactor (4), applicants are encouraged to accompany their narrative response, as appropriate, with a development and operating “pro forma” or similar analysis of the proposed project financing. Such pro forma or other financial analysis will not be counted in the fifteen page limitation on the narrative response to the Rating Factors as provided in section V.A.1(b) of this NOFA. In the narrative response, applicants must clearly address the question of why the BEDI funds are critical to the success of this project by providing the following items:

(a) Use of BEDI and section 108 Funds to Fill Financing Gaps. The applicant must provide an economic rationale that demonstrates how the use of the BEDI and section 108 funds will directly impact the financial feasibility of the proposed project. The response should discuss the critical gaps that exist in financing the proposed project, why those gaps exist and how the BEDI and section 108 funds will be used to fill those gaps. The narrative response, including any pro forma or similar analysis, should demonstrate how the proposed BEDI and section 108 financing will yield economic benefits critical to the success of the project, including, for example, increased rates of return or debt coverage ratios, reduced rents or other similar financial outcomes necessary to attract private investment.

(b) Project Costs and Financial Requirements. A funding sources and uses statement must also be provided that specifies the source of funds for each identified use or activity, along with the derivation of project costs.

Rating Factor 4: Leveraging Resources (15 Points Maximum)

In evaluating this Factor, HUD will consider the extent to which the response demonstrates the likelihood that the project will leverage both section 108 loan and other public or private funds as part of the total project resources. Points for this Factor will be awarded in two parts, for the following:

(1) Leverage of section 108 funds (Up to 8 points). The minimum ratio of section 108 funds to BEDI funds in any project may not be less than 1:1. Points will be awarded based upon the extent to which the proposed project leverages an amount of section 108 funds greater than a 1:1 ratio. If the application has a ratio of 1:1, it will not receive any points under this subfactor. The higher the ratio of additional new section 108 funds to BEDI funds proposed in an application, the more points it will receive under this subfactor, within the points available hereunder. (See Sections III.C.3(b) and Section VI.B.1(a) of this NOFA. regarding the conditioning of BEDI awards on achievement of a specific BEDI/section 108 leveraging ratio.)

(2) Leverage of Other Financial Resources (Up to 7 points). HUD will evaluate the extent to which other funds (public or private) are leveraged by BEDI grant funds, and the extent to which such other funds are firmly committed to the project. This could include the use of CDBG funds, other federal or state grants or loans, local general funds, project equity or commercial financing provided by private sources or funds from nonprofits or other sources. In order to receive points for other public and privately committed funds under this subfactor (2):

(a) Applicants must provide evidence that such funds are “firmly committed” as defined in section I.C. of this NOFA.

(b) Each agreement or letter of commitment must include the name of the organization making the commitment, the proposed total level of commitment, and the responsibilities of the organization as they relate to the proposed BEDI project.

(c) Each commitment—including the donation or purchase of real property or the provision of in-kind services—must be assigned a monetary value by the party making the commitment, accompanied by an indication of the basis for that assigned value.

(d) The commitment must be signed by an official of the organization legally authorized to make commitments on behalf of the organization, with a statement confirming that authority, and remain in effect for a period stated in the commitment.

(e) If a commitment is to be self-financed, such as a commitment by a private developer to provide a specified amount of equity investment in the project, the party making that commitment must evidence its financial capacity through the submission of a corporate or personal financial statement or other appropriate means in order to receive points under this subfactor (2).

(f) For Applicants Committing CDBG Funds: In order for an applicant's commitment of CDBG funds to be accepted by HUD as additional financing for a BEDI project, a resolution from the local governing body (e.g., city/borough council) authorizing the amount and permitted uses of the funds must be provided.

All such funds may also be committed subject to completion of a satisfactory environmental review required under 24 CFR part 58 for the project for purposes of this section.

Rating Factor 5: Achieving Results and Program Evaluation (15 Points Maximum)

This Factor emphasizes HUD's commitment to ensuring that applicants maintain commitments made in their application and assess their performance to ensure that performance goals are met. This Factor also evaluates the extent to which the results of the proposed BEDI project address the policy priorities of the Department. In addition to a narrative response, applicants must complete the logic model provided in the General Section of the SuperNOFA (form HUD-96010) in order to receive points under this Factor.

(1) Performance Measurement Plan (Up to 12 points). HUD requires applicants to develop an effective, quantifiable, outcome oriented performance measurement plan for measuring performance and determining that BEDI project goals have been met. The applicant's response to this subfactor (1) should identify: (a) Each of the specific project outcomes for the proposed BEDI project, i.e., the near-term, measurable economic benefits to be achieved; (b) all interim benchmarks of the project and the associated time frames for meeting each interim benchmark; and (c) the performance indicators selected by the applicant to measure its achievement of the identified interim benchmarks and project outcomes. The performance indicators selected by the applicant should be objectively quantifiable and measure actual achievements against anticipated results. The response to this subfactor (1) should identify what will be measured, how it will be measured, and the procedures or plans that are in place to make adjustments to the project redevelopment plan if performance targets are not met within established time frames.

In response to this subfactor (1), applicants should address any of the following applicable outcomes or ultimate goals identified by HUD for BEDI projects: the number of jobs to be created or retained; the amount of increased wages resulting from the creation or retention of jobs; the number of housing units to be constructed or rehabilitated; the total square feet of commercial and industrial space to be created; the total number of low- and moderate-income persons to benefit from the project; the total number of businesses assisted by the project; the number of acres of brownfields returned to productive economic use; and the amount of any increased land value that results from the BEDI project. Applicants may also propose additional quantifiable outcomes or goals related to other benefits expected for the neighborhood or for persons assisted, as part of the evaluation plan.

(2) Policy Priorities (Up to 3 points). The applicant's response to this subfactor (2) should address how the project will address the following policy priorities of the Department, as further detailed in section V.B.2 of the General Section of the SuperNOFA. The number of points to be awarded for each applicable policy priority addressed by the proposed BEDI project is indicated below:

(a) For BEDI projects that propose only housing activities:

(i) The extent to which the project will increase affordable housing and homeownership opportunities for low- and moderate-income persons, the disabled, the elderly, minorities, and families where English may be the second language, whether through the provision of housing or employment which will enable residents to access affordable housing and have a choice of such housing in environmentally healthy and revitalized neighborhoods (1 point); and

(ii) The extent to which the project will assist in breaking down regulatory barriers that impede the availability of affordable housing (up to 2 points).

(b) For all other BEDI projects:

(i) The extent to which the proposed project will improve the quality of life in the nation's communities, by bringing private capital to distressed communities (1 point);

(ii) The extent to which the proposed project will finance business investments that will grow new businesses or maintain and expand existing businesses (1 point); and

(iii) The extent to which the proposed project will create decent jobs for low-income persons (1 point).

Bonus Points

An application may receive up to four bonus points, until the maximum of four points are achieved. Two bonus points may be awarded for each of the following:

(1) Projects that are located either in federally designated Empowerment Zones, Enterprise, or Renewal Communities (see the General Section of the SuperNOFA for advice on locating a list of designated communities);

(2) Projects that are located in Brownfields Showcase Communities designated by EPA. A list of the federally designated Brownfields Showcase Communities is listed in Appendix B of section VIII of this NOFA and is also available from the SuperNOFA Information Center or through the HUD Web site, http://www.hud.gov.

B. Reviews and Selection Process

1. Reviews and Selection Process. All applications meeting BEDI program and threshold requirements will be rated under the selection criteria in section V.A. of this NOFA. Applications will be selected for funding as follows:

a. Fundable BEDI grant applications must meet the program and submission requirements of this NOFA and the threshold requirements stipulated in section III.C.2 of the General Section of the SuperNOFA or they will not be ranked.

b. All BEDI grant applications that meet threshold requirements will be ranked separately in order of points assigned with the applications receiving more points ranked above those receiving fewer points.

c. In the event two or more applications are given the same score, but there are insufficient funds to fund all of the tied applications, the application(s) with the highest score(s) on Rating Factor 3 (Soundness of Approach) shall be selected. If there is still a tie, the following Factors will be considered sequentially, with the application having the high score on each Factor in the following order taking precedence until the tie is broken: Rating Factor 1 (Capacity and Experience), Rating Factor 2 (Distress/Extent of the Problem), Rating Factor 4 (Leveraging Resources), and Rating Factor 5 (Achieving Results and Program Evaluation).

d. Fundable BEDI applications will be funded in rank order until the total aggregate amount of the approvable applications funded is equal to the maximum amount available in the competition (subject to the limitations described in section II.C above).

2. Corrections to Deficient Applications. The General Section of the SuperNOFA provides the procedures for corrections to deficient applications.

3. Applicant Debriefing. The General Section of the SuperNOFA provides information on applicant requests for a debriefing. Applicants requesting to be debriefed must send a written request to the contact person for the BEDI program, Mr. Frank McNally, at the address listed in section VII of this NOFA.

C. Anticipated Announcement and Award Dates

Historically, BEDI awardees have been notified of the approval of BEDI applications within approximately 90 days of the application deadline.

VI. Award Administration Information Back to Top

A. Award Notices

1. Notice of Award and Obligation

BEDI award recipients will receive written notice of approval of their applications and the related terms and conditions of the award. An authorized official of the applicant receiving a BEDI award will be required to sign and return an acceptance of the BEDI award. BEDI funds shall be obligated for an approved application upon the return of a signed acceptance of the award to HUD and a countersignature of that acceptance by an authorized HUD official.

2. Award Disbursements and Amendments

a. Timing of Section 108 Approval and BEDI Grant Disbursements.

(1) To the extent a full and complete Section 108 application is submitted with the BEDI grant application, HUD will evaluate the Section 108 application immediately following the competition for BEDI grant funds. Note that the 108 application must be submitted to the appropriate HUD field office concurrently with submission to Headquarters.

(2) Notwithstanding any earlier obligation or award of BEDI funds to a grantee, or execution of a grant agreement, HUD will not permit the grantee to draw down BEDI funds before the issuance and at least partial funding of the obligations evidencing the related section 108-guaranteed loan.

(3) Pursuant to the FY2004 HUD Appropriations Act (under the “Brownfields Redevelopment” heading) and 31 U.S.C. 1552, FY 2004 BEDI funds must be obligated (i.e., awarded) by HUD by September 30, 2005, and must be disbursed by HUD to the grantee by September 30, 2010. FY2003 BEDI funds must be obligated by September 30, 2004, and must be disbursed by HUD to the grantee by September 30, 2009. FY2001 BEDI funds are not subject to statutory obligation or disbursement deadlines. In all cases, however, HUD reserves the right to require earlier disbursement under a BEDI grant agreement. Accordingly, a BEDI awardee must ensure the timely submission of its section 108 Loan Guarantee application, the execution of the section 108 Contract for Loan Guarantee Assistance and BEDI Grant Agreement, and the issuance of the section 108 Loan Guarantee Note.

B. Administrative and National Policy Requirements

1. Terms and Conditions

a. Ratio of BEDI to section 108 Loan Guarantee Funds. Because the proposed ratio of BEDI funds to section 108 funds presented in an approved BEDI application represents an applicant's financial commitment to a BEDI project, HUD will condition the BEDI grant award on the grantee's achievement of that specific ratio. The failure of the grantee to meet that condition by obtaining timely HUD approval of a commitment for, and issuance of, the required section 108 guaranteed obligations ratio may result in the cancellation and recapture of all or a proportionate share of the BEDI grant award.

b. Approval of section 108 Loan Guarantee Application and Disbursement of Funds. As a condition of any award under this NOFA, if the related section 108 application has not been submitted and approved within 10 months of written HUD notification of selection for potential funding under this NOFA, HUD may deobligate the BEDI funds. BEDI grant awards and grant agreements will contain conditions requiring grantees to adhere to time frames mutually agreed on by the applicant/grantee and HUD for implementing proposed projects and drawing section 108 and BEDI funds. If BEDI grant funds and section 108 loan proceeds are not disbursed to the applicant within the time frames specified in the BEDI grant agreement, HUD reserves the right to cancel the award and recapture all or a portion of the BEDI funds, as applicable under the grant agreement.

c. BEDI Application Amendments. Any modifications or amendments to an application approved pursuant to this NOFA, whether requested by the applicant or by HUD, must be within the scope of the approved original BEDI application in all respects material to rating the application, unless HUD determines that the revised application remains within the competitive range and is otherwise approvable under this NOFA. In addition, if the applicant proposes an amendment after the period during which appropriated funds are available for obligation (for FY2004 BEDI funds, after September 30, 2005), HUD will be unable to approve any amendment which materially changes the scope, purpose, or need for the original award. In such a case, the unused BEDI funds must be deobligated and returned to the U.S. Treasury.

a. Executive Order 12898 (Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations) directs Federal agencies to develop strategies to address environmental justice. Environmental justice seeks to rectify the disproportionately high burden of environmental pollution that is often borne by low-income, minority, and other disadvantaged communities, and to ensure community involvement in policies and programs addressing this issue.

b. HUD expects that projects presented for BEDI funding will integrate environmental justice concerns and provide measurable economic benefits for affected communities and their current residents for the long term.

3. Other National Requirements. BEDI applicants are directed to the Section III.C of the General Section of the SuperNOFA, which provides the statutory, regulatory, threshold, and public policy requirements applicable to all HUD grantees. In particular, BEDI applicants should carefully review provisions relating to Executive Order 13202 (Preservation of Open Competition and Government Neutrality) and Federal laws governing the procurement of recovered materials.

C. Reporting

Post Award Reporting Requirements. CDBG regulations at 24 CFR 570.507 (for metropolitan city and urban counties) and 24 CFR 570.491 (for State grantees) require the submission of a Consolidated Annual Performance Evaluation Report (CAPER) describing the use of CDBG funds during the program year. 24 CFR 570.3 defines CDBG funds to include BEDI grants, and accordingly, grantees must report specifically on the use of BEDI grant funds and section 108 loan guarantee proceeds in the CAPER. For each reporting period, as part of the required report to HUD, grant recipients must include a completed Logic Model (form HUD 96010), which identifies output and outcome achievements.

VII. Agency Contact Back to Top

For Technical Assistance. Contact: Frank McNally, Economic Development Specialist, Office of Economic Development, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 Seventh Street, SW., Room 7140, Washington, DC 20410; telephone (202) 708-0614, extension 7100 (this is not a toll-free number). Hearing or speech challenged persons may call the Federal Information Relay Service at 800-877-8339 (this is a toll-free number). Before the application due date, HUD staff will be available to provide general guidance and technical assistance about this BEDI NOFA. However, HUD staff are not permitted to assist in preparing a BEDI application. Following selection of applicants, but before awards are made, HUD staff are available to assist in clarifying or confirming information that is a prerequisite to the offer of an award by HUD. In addition, the Section 108 Loan Guarantee program is not a competitive program and therefore is not subject to those provisions of the HUD Reform Act pertaining to competitions that do not permit HUD staff to assist in the preparation of applications. HUD staff are available to provide advice and assistance to develop Section 108 loan applications.

VIII. Other Information Back to Top

Appendices

1. Appendix A—Non-Standard BEDI Forms

The non-standard forms for the BEDI application follow.

BILLING CODE 4210-32-P

Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (Shop) Back to Top

Overview Information Back to Top

A. Federal Agency Name: Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Community Planning and Development.

B. Funding Opportunity Title: Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP).

C. Announcement Type: Initial announcement.

D. Funding Opportunity Number: The Federal Register number for this NOFA is FR-4900-N-15. The OMB paperwork approval number for this program is 2506-0157.

E. Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number: 14.247 Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program

F. Dates: The application due date is on or before July 20, 2004. Please see the General Section of the SuperNOFA for application submission, delivery, and timely receipt requirements.

G. Optional, Additional Overview Content Information: SHOP funding is awarded to national and regional nonprofit organizations and consortia demonstrating experience in administering self-help housing programs in which the homebuyers contribute a significant amount of sweat-equity toward construction or rehabilitation of the dwelling.

The amount available for SHOP in Fiscal Year 2004 (FY) is approximately $26,840,700 to be awarded to eligible applicants.

Full Text of Announcement Back to Top

I. Funding Opportunity Description Back to Top

A. Program Description

SHOP funding is intended to facilitate and encourage innovative homeownership opportunities on a national geographically-diverse basis through self-help housing programs that require a significant amount of sweat-equity by the homebuyer toward the construction or rehabilitation of the dwelling.

SHOP programs are administered by national and regional nonprofit organizations and consortia. Units developed with SHOP funds must be decent, safe, and sanitary non-luxury dwellings and must be made available to eligible homebuyers at prices below the prevailing market prices. Eligible homebuyers are low-income individuals and families (i.e., those whose annual incomes do not exceed 80 percent of the median income for the area, as established by HUD) who would otherwise be unable to purchase a dwelling but for the provision of sweat equity. Housing assisted under this notice must involve labor contributed by homebuyers and volunteers in the construction of dwellings and by other activities that involve the community in the project.

B. Authority

The funding made available under this program section of the SuperNOFA is authorized by section 11 of the Housing Opportunity Program Extension Act of 1996 (42 U.S.C. 12805 note) (the “Extension Act”).

II. Award Information Back to Top

The amount available for this program is $26,840,700 in FY2004. Any unobligated funds from previous competitions or additional funds that may become available due to deobligation or recapture from previous awards or budget transfers may be added to the FY2004 appropriation to fund applications submitted in response to this NOFA. Awards will be made to successful applicants in the form of a grant.

III. Eligibility Information Back to Top

A. Eligible Applicants

You must be a national or regional nonprofit public or private organization or consortium that has the capacity and experience to provide or facilitate self-help housing homeownership opportunities. Your organization or consortium must undertake eligible SHOP activities directly and/or provide funding assistance to your local affiliates to carry out SHOP activities.

“National organization” is defined as an organization that carries out self-help housing activities or funds affiliates that carry out self-help housing activities on a national scope. A national organization must propose in its application to use a significant amount of SHOP funds in at least two states.

Regional organization is defined as an organization that carries out self-help housing activities or funds affiliates that carry out self-help housing activities on a regional scope. “Regional” is an area, such as the Southwest or Northeast, that must include at least two states. The regional organization must propose to use a significant amount of SHOP funds in at least two states. The states in the region need not be contiguous, and the service area of the organization need not precisely conform to state boundaries. Affiliates working under regional organizations must be located within the regional organization's service area.

“Consortium” is defined as two or more nonprofit organizations located in at least two states that individually have the capacity and experience to carry out self-help housing activities or fund affiliates that carry out self-help housing activities on a national or regional scope and enter into an agreement to submit a single application for SHOP funding on a national or regional basis. The consortium must propose to use a significant amount of SHOP funds in each state represented in the consortium. One organization must be designated as the lead entity. The lead entity must submit the application and, if selected for funding, execute the SHOP Grant Agreement with HUD and assume responsibility for the grant on behalf of the consortium in compliance with all program requirements.

A consortium agreement, executed, and dated by all consortium members, for the purpose of applying for and using FY2004 SHOP funds must be submitted with your application. All consortium members must be identified in your application. Your application must be one integrated document that demonstrates the consortium's comprehensive approach to self-help housing. If individual consortium members will use different program designs, your application must describe the program design of each consortium member. Upon being funded, the lead entity must enter into a separate agreement with each consortium member. The agreement must incorporate the requirements of the FY2004 SHOP Grant Agreement between HUD and the consortium and outline the individual consortium member's responsibilities for compliance with HUD's 2004 SHOP program.

“Affiliate” is defined as:

(1) A local public or private non-profit self-help housing organization which is a subordinate organization (i.e., chapter, local, post, or unit) of a central organization and covered by the group exemption letter issued to the central organization under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code;

(2) A local public or private non-profit self-help housing organization with which the applicant has an existing relationship (e.g., the applicant has provided technical assistance or funding to the local self-help housing organization); or

(3) A local public or private non-profit self-help housing organization with which the applicant does not have an existing relationship, but to which the applicant will provide necessary technical assistance and mentoring as part of funding under the application.

You must carry out eligible activities or you must fund affiliates to carry out eligible activities. If you are a consortium, each of your affiliates must be linked to an individual consortium member.

Your application may not propose to fund any affiliate or consortium member that is also included in another SHOP application. You must ensure that any affiliate or consortium member under your FY2004 application is not also seeking FY2004 SHOP funding from another SHOP applicant. If an affiliate applies for funds through more than one applicant, it may be disqualified for any funding.

B. Cost Sharing or Matching

There is no match requirement for the SHOP funds. However, you are expected to leverage resources for the construction of self-help housing assisted with SHOP. Failure to provide documentation of leveraged resources as described in rating factor 4 will result in a lower application score.

C. Other

1. Eligible Activities

Eligible activities are:

a. Land acquisition (including financing and closing costs), which may include reimbursing an organization, consortium, or affiliate, upon approval of any required environmental review, for non-grant amounts expended by the organization, consortium, or affiliate to acquire land before completion of the review;

b. Infrastructure improvements (installing, extending, constructing, rehabilitating, or otherwise improving utilities and other infrastructure, including removal of environmental hazards); and

c. Administration, planning, and management development, including the costs of general management, oversight, and coordination of the SHOP grant; staff and overhead costs of the SHOP grant; costs of providing information to the public about the SHOP grant; cost of providing civil rights training to local affiliates as well as any expenses involved in affirmatively furthering fair housing; and indirect costs (such as rent and utilities) of the grantee or affiliate in carrying out the SHOP activities.

2. Threshold Requirements

In addition to the statutory, regulatory, threshold, and public policy requirements listed in section III.C of the General Section of the SuperNOFA, each applicant must meet and comply with the following SHOP threshold requirements:

a. You must be eligible to apply under SHOP (see section III.A. of this program section).

b. The amount of funding you request must be sufficient to complete a minimum of 30 self-help housing units and may not exceed an average investment of $15,000 per unit of SHOP funding.

c. The population you propose to serve must be eligible for SHOP assistance. Eligible homebuyers are low-income individuals and families (i.e., those whose incomes do not exceed 80 percent of the median income for the area, as established by HUD). You must identify the definition of “annual income” to be used in your proposed program. You may use one of the following three definitions of “annual income” to determine whether a homebuyer is income eligible under SHOP:

(1) “Annual income” as defined at 24 CFR 5.609; or

(2) “Annual income” as reported under the Census long-form for the most recent available decennial Census; or

(3) “Adjusted gross income” as defined for purposes of reporting under Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Form 1040 series for individual Federal annual income tax purposes.

You may also adopt or develop your own definition of annual income for use in determining income eligibility under SHOP subject to review and approval by HUD.

d. You must demonstrate that you have successfully completed at least 30 self-help homeownership units in a national or regional area within the 24-month period immediately preceding the publication of this NOFA. To qualify as self-help homeownership units, the homebuyers must have contributed a significant amount of sweat-equity toward the construction of the dwellings as set forth in section III.C.2.e.

e. Your program must require homebuyers to contribute a minimum of 100 hours of sweat equity toward the construction or rehabilitation of their own homes. However, in the case of a household with only one adult, the requirement is 50 hours of sweat equity toward the construction of the home. This includes training for construction on the dwelling units, but excludes homebuyer counseling and home maintenance training. Reasonable accommodation must be permitted in the provision of sweat equity for persons with disabilities.

f. Your program must involve community participation in which volunteers assist in the construction of dwellings. Volunteer labor is work performed by an individual without promise, expectation or compensation for the work rendered. A homebuyer, who contributes sweat equity to his/her own home, counts as volunteer labor when working on other homes.

g. You must propose to use the SHOP funds for eligible activities (see sections III.C. and IV.E.). You must carry out the activities or you must fund affiliates to carry out the activities.

h. DUNS Number Requirement. All applicants must provide a DUNS number pursuant to the DUNS number requirement specified in section III.C.2.b. of the General Section. Failure to provide a DUNS number will be treated as a technical deficiency. Failure to correct the deficiency will result in your application not being eligible to receive funding.

3. Threshold Submission Requirements

You must describe how you qualify as an eligible applicant and provide evidence of your public or private non-profit status, such as a current Internal Revenue Service ruling that your organization is exempt from taxation under section 501(c)(3) or 501(c)(4) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986. If you are a consortium, each participant in your consortium must be a nonprofit organization. Each consortium member must submit evidence of its nonprofit status to the lead entity for inclusion in the consortium's application package. In addition, your consortium agreement must be submitted.

Threshold requirements (b) through (g) do not require separate submissions. In order for your application to be rated and ranked, these requirements must be addressed under the submission requirements for the rating factors listed below in section V, Application Review Information Criteria, of this SHOP NOFA.

4. Statutory and Program Requirements

The operation of SHOP is governed by the statute, Public L. 104-120, § 11, 110 Stat. 841 (March 28, 1996), as amended; 42 U.S.C. 12805 note, and this NOFA. There are no program regulations. You must comply with all statutory requirements applicable to SHOP as cited in section I., Funding Opportunity Description, of this SHOP NOFA and the program requirements cited in this SHOP NOFA. Pursuant to these requirements, you must:

a. Develop, through significant amounts of sweat-equity by each homebuyer and volunteer labor, at least 30 dwelling units at an average cost of no more than $15,000 per unit in SHOP funds for land acquisition and infrastructure improvements;

b. Use your grant to leverage other sources of funding, including private or other public funds, to complete construction of the housing units;

c. Develop quality dwellings that comply with local building and safety codes and standards, that will be made available to homebuyers at prices below the prevailing market price;

d. Schedule SHOP activities to expend all grant funds awarded and substantially fulfill your obligations under your grant agreement, including timely development of the appropriate number of dwelling units. Grant funds must be expended within 24 months of the date that grant funds are first made available for draw-down in a line of credit established by HUD for the Grantee, except that grant funds provided to affiliates that develop five or more units must be expended within 36 months; and

e. Not require a homebuyer to make an up-front financial contribution to a housing unit other than cash contributed for downpayment or closing costs at the time of acquisition.

IV. Application and Submission Information Back to Top

A. Address To Request Application Package

Application. There is no application kit. This notice contains all the information necessary for national and regional nonprofit organizations and consortia to submit an application for SHOP funding. Copies of the standard forms are located in the General Section of the SuperNOFA or you may request copies by calling HUD's NOFA Information Center at: 800-HUD-8929. If you have a hearing or speech impairment, please call the Center's TTY number at 800-HUD-2209. When requesting standard forms, you should refer to SHOP and provide your name and address (including ZIP code) and telephone number (including area code). See section IV.B.2., Assembly Format, for application submission requirements. You may also access the application requirements on the Internet through HUD's Web site at: http://www.grants.gov.

B. Content and Form of Application Submission

Your application should consist of the items listed in the section below called Assembly Format. The standard forms, certifications, and assurances applicable to this funding (collectively, referred to as the “standard forms”) can be found in the Appendices to the General Section of the SuperNOFA.

1. Page Limits. There are page limits for your responses to the five rating factors. A national or regional organization is limited to 60 pages of narrative for responding to the five rating factors. A consortium is permitted up to 10 additional pages total to accommodate the requirement to address the capacity and soundness of approach of its individual consortium members if they are different. All pages must be numbered sequentially from 1 through 60 or 70, for factors 1 through 5, and tabs must be inserted to separate each factor. Your application may contain only the narrative statements that address the five rating factors and the required forms, certifications, assurances, and appendices listed in Assembly Format below to be submitted for review. Any additional information provided outside the narrative statements to further explain information required in the five factors will not be considered in the scoring of the application. In responding to the five factors, information must be included in your narrative response to the factor, unless this NOFA states that it should be included as an appendix. Applicants are discouraged from submitting unnecessary documentation.

2. Assembly Format. Your FY2004 application should be assembled with tabs designating Application Overview, Narrative Statements (rating factors), Forms, and Appendices. In order to receive full consideration for funding, your application should be assembled according to the following checklist to ensure that all of the required items have been submitted.

a. Application Overview: (Not subject to the page limitations.)

___ SF-424, Application for Federal Assistance (signed by the authorized representative of the organization eligible to receive funds).

___ SF-424 Supplement, Survey on Ensuring Equal Opportunity for Applicants.

___ HUD-424B, Applicant Assurances and Certifications.

___ Narrative describing qualification as an eligible applicant and evidence of non-profit status.

___ Consortium Agreement, if applicable.

___ Program Summary.

b. Narrative Statements Addressing: (Subject to the page limitations described above.)

___ Factor 1—Capacity of the Applicant and Relevant Organizational Staff.

___ Factor 2—Need/Extent of the Problem.

___ Factor 3—Soundness of Approach.

___ Factor 4—Leveraging Resources.

___ Factor 5—Achieving Results and Program Evaluation. Program Outcome Logic Model, HUD-96010 (Evaluation Plan).

c. Forms, Certifications and Assurances: (Not subject to the page limitations.)

___ HUD-424CB, Grant Application Detailed Budget.

___ SF-LLL, Disclosure of Lobbying Activity, as applicable.

___ HUD-2880, Applicant/Recipient Disclosure/Update Report.

___ HUD-2990, Certification of Consistency with the RC/EZ/EC Strategic Plan.

___ HUD-2993, Acknowledgment of Application Receipt.

d. Appendices: (Not subject to the page limitations.)

___ Recent audit, if available.

___ A copy of your code of conduct and a narrative description of the methods you will use to ensure that all officers, employees and agents of your organization become aware of your code of conduct.

___ Leveraging documentation—firm commitment letters.

___ Survey of potential affiliates, if applicable (see Factor 2, element “a”).

___ Demonstration of past performance for new applicants (see Factor 1).

___ HUD-27300, Questionnaire for HUD's Initiative on Removal of Regulatory Barriers.

___ Evaluative criteria for Removal of Regulatory Barriers to Affordable Housing in affiliate selection process, if applicable.

3. Technical Deficiencies. Section V.B.4 of the General Section of the SuperNOFA provides the procedures for corrections to deficient applications.

C. Submission Dates and Times

To apply for SHOP funding, please follow these procedures and those noted in the General Section of this SuperNOFA.

1. Application Deadline. Applications for SHOP grants are due on or before 12 midnight eastern time on July 20, 2004. Please follow the specific Mailing and Receipt Procedures and Proof of Timely Submission located in section IV.F of the General Section as failure to comply with these procedures may disqualify your application.

2. Acceptance of Hand-Carried Submissions. Please follow the procedures for hand-carried submissions located in Section IV.F. of the General Section as failure to comply with these procedures may disqualify your application.

D. Intergovernmental Review

Executive Order 12372 review does not apply to SHOP.

E. Funding Restrictions

1. Administrative costs. Administrative costs may not exceed 20 percent of any SHOP grant. Indirect costs may only be charged to the SHOP grant under a cost allocation plan prepared in accordance with OMB Circular A-122.

2. Pre-agreement costs. After submission of the application, but before the effective date of the SHOP Grant Agreement, an applicant may incur costs which may be charged to its SHOP grant provided the costs are eligible (see section III.C.1.) and in compliance with the requirements of this NOFA (including environmental review requirements) and the application. Applicants incur costs at their own risk, because applicants that do not receive a SHOP grant cannot be reimbursed.

3. Ineligible Costs. Costs associated with the rehabilitation, improvement, or construction of dwellings and any other costs not identified in section III.C.1. are not eligible uses of program funds. Acquiring land for land banking purposes (i.e., holding land for an indefinite period) is an ineligible use of SHOP funds.

F. Other Submission Requirements

1. Application Mailing Procedures. Applicants must follow the specific Mailing and Receipt Procedures and Proof of Timely Submission located in section IV.F.1 and 2. of the General Section of this SuperNOFA.

2. Address for Submitting Applications. Submit one original and two copies of the application to: HUD Headquarters, Robert C. Weaver Federal Building, 451 Seventh Street, SW., Room 7251, Washington, DC 20410-7000, ATTN: Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP).

V. Application Review Information Criteria Back to Top

1. Rating Factor l: Capacity of the Applicant and Relevant Organizational Staff (30 points)

This factor examines the extent to which you, as a single applicant or consortium (including individual consortium members), have the experience and organizational resources necessary to carry out the proposed activities effectively and in a timely manner. Any applicant that does not receive at least 20 points under this factor will not be eligible for funding.

In evaluating this factor, HUD will consider your recent and relevant experience in carrying out the activities you propose, and your administrative and fiscal management capability to administer the grant, including the ability to account for funds appropriately. All applicants, including individual consortium members, must have capacity and experience in administering or facilitating self-help housing. If you are sponsoring affiliate organizations that do not have experience in developing self-help housing, HUD will assess your organization's experience in providing technical assistance and the ability to mentor new affiliates. For applicants that currently have open SHOP grants, HUD will assess your organization's past performance based upon performance reports that demonstrate your organization's completion of eligible SHOP activities, the number of families provided housing, financial status information focusing on timely use of funds, and other program outcomes. HUD will consider whether you have had funds deobligated for failure to meet your drawdown and construction schedules or funds were returned because of monitoring findings. HUD will also rely on monitoring reports, audit reports and other information available to HUD in making its determination under this factor. For applicants that currently have open SHOP grants from previous years, HUD will assess your pattern of meeting benchmarks in the most recent three years of participation in the program. If you are not a current recipient of SHOP funds, you must summarize your past performance in undertaking similar or the same activities during the past three years. You may supplement your narrative with existing internal or external performance reports or other information that will assist HUD in making this determination and submit it as an appendix. Failure to provide this information will result in a lower score.

Submission Requirements for Rating Factor 1

a. (10 points) Past Experience. You must describe your past experience in carrying out self-help housing activities (specify the time frame during which these activities occurred) that are the same as, or similar to, the activities you propose for funding, and demonstrate reasonable success in carrying out and completing those activities. You must include the average number of sweat-equity hours provided per family, and volunteer labor. You may demonstrate reasonable success by showing that your previous activities were carried out as proposed, consistent with the time frame you proposed for completion of all work. You must provide evidence regarding your performance in meeting established benchmarks for acquiring properties and completing housing construction and indicate that performance reports were submitted, as required. New applicants furnishing supplemental material should refer to the introduction to this rating factor. To the extent that you encountered delays that were beyond your control, please describe the circumstances causing the delays and the mitigating actions taken to overcome them to successfully complete your program.

b. (8 points) Management Structure. You must provide a description of your organization's or consortium's management structure. You must also describe your key staff and their specific roles and responsibilities for day-to-day management of your proposed SHOP program. If you elect to work with affiliates that do not have capacity and experience, you must describe how you will provide technical assistance and mentor these organizations to develop capacity either directly or indirectly.

c. (8 points) Financial Control. You must demonstrate your organization's ability to track financial resources with adequate financial control and accounting procedures. You must describe your financial control procedures for SHOP and how they meet 24 CFR 84.21, “Standards for Financial Management Systems.” Under 24 CFR 84.21, your financial management system must provide:

(1) Accurate, current, and complete disclosure of the financial results;

(2) Adequate identification of the source and application of funds including information pertaining to Federal awards, authorization, obligations, unobligated balances, assets, outlays, income and interest;

(3) Effective control over the accountability for all funds, property and other assets and adequately safeguards all such assets and assures they are used solely for authorized purposes;

(4) Written procedures to minimize the time elapsing between the transfer of funds to your organization from the U.S. Treasury and the issuance or redemption of checks, warrants, or payments by other means for program purposes by your organization;

(5) Written procedures for determining the reasonableness, allocability, and allowability of costs in accordance with the provisions of the applicable Federal cost principles and the terms and conditions of the award; and

(6) Accounting records including cost accounting records that are supported by source documentation.

You should submit a copy of your most recent audit, if one is required to be performed for your organization. A consortium only needs to submit an audit of the lead entity.

d. (4 points) Experience Developing Accessible Housing. You must demonstrate your experience in and ability to construct and alter homes by describing the kinds of features that you have used to design homes in accordance with universal design and visitability standards, or otherwise make homes accessible to the elderly or persons with disabilities. You must provide data on the number of accessible units you have completed and the timeframe during which units were constructed and/or altered.

2. Rating Factor 2: Need/Extent of the Problem (10 Points)

This factor examines the extent to which you demonstrate an urgent need for SHOP funds in your proposed target areas based on the need for affordable housing, and the quality of the data submitted to substantiate that need.

The purpose of this factor is to make sure that funding is provided where a need for funding exists. Under this factor, you must identify the community need or needs that your proposed SHOP activities are designed to address. If you plan to select some or all affiliates after application submission, you must demonstrate how the selection of affiliates will help to address the needs identified in the proposed target areas.

Submission Requirements for Rating Factor 2

a. (5 points) Extent of Need. Describe the extent of need for SHOP funds in the communities or areas in which your proposed activities will be carried out. You must specifically address the need for acquisition and/or infrastructure assistance for self-help housing activities in these areas. National and regional organizations and consortia that select affiliates after application submission must submit a list of affiliates surveyed upon which they are basing their need for SHOP funding and the specific criteria to be used to select communities or projects based on need.

b. (5 points) Documentation of Need. Information you submit to demonstrate the need or needs in the target areas must include, but is not limited to, the following:

(1) (3 points) Data describing:

(a) The housing market data in the proposed target areas including, but not limited to, low-income, minority, and disability populations; number of home sales and median sales price; and homeownership, rental and vacancy rates. This information can be obtained from state or regional housing plans, the American Housing Survey, the United States Census, Home Mortgage Disclosure Act data or other local data sources, such as Consolidated Plans, comprehensive plans, local tax assessor databases or relevant realtor information. Data included in your application must be specific to your proposed target areas.

(b) The housing problems in the proposed target areas such as overcrowding, cost burden, housing age or deterioration, low homeownership rate (especially among minority families, families with children, and families with members with disabilities) and lack of adequate infrastructure or utilities.

(2) (2 points) Data demonstrating:

(a) Need for accessible homes in the target area(s).

(b) Evidence of housing discrimination in the target area(s).

(c) Any need for housing shown in the local Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice, if addressed.

3. Rating Factor 3: Soundness of Approach (40 Points)

This factor examines the quality and soundness of your plan to carry out a self-help housing program. In evaluating this factor HUD will consider:

a. Your proposed use of SHOP funds, including the number of units and the type(s) of housing to be constructed, the use of sweat equity and volunteer labor; your schedule for expending funds and completing construction; including interim milestones; the appropriateness of proposed housing to the specific needs of target area(s); the proposed budget and cost effectiveness of your program; and your plan to reach all potentially-eligible homebuyers, including those with disabilities and others least likely to apply, and your criteria for selecting homebuyers.

b. How your planned activities further the Department's FY2004 policy priorities noted in section V.B.2 of the General Section. For FY2004, the four policy priorities that apply to SHOP are:

(1) Providing increased homeownership opportunities for low- and moderate-income persons, persons with disabilities, the elderly, minorities, and families with limited English proficiency.

(2) Encouraging accessible design features: Visitability in new construction and substantial rehabilitation and universal design.

(3) Providing full and equal access to grassroots faith-based and other community-based organizations in HUD program implementation; and

(4) Removal of regulatory barriers to affordable housing.

Submission Requirements for Factor 3

Activities. Describe the types of activities that you propose to fund with SHOP and the proposed number of units to be assisted with SHOP funding, the housing type(s) (single family or multifamily, or both) to be assisted and the form of ownership (fee simple, condominium, cooperative, etc.) you propose to use.

a. (5 points) Sweat Equity. Describe the individual sweat equity requirements (i.e., types of tasks and numbers of hours required of homebuyers) of your program, and describe how your program will provide reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities by identifying sweat equity assignments that can be performed by the homebuyer regardless of the disability, such as doing administrative, clerical, organization, or other office work or minor tasks on site. Reasonable accommodation can include sweat equity by the homebuyer that can be performed regardless of the disability or substitution of a non-homebuyer designee(s) to perform the sweat equity assignments on behalf of the homebuyer. Include the dollar value of the sweat equity and volunteer labor contribution and specify the amount by which this contribution will reduce the sales price to the homebuyer. Applicants showing a larger reduction of the sales price as a result of the homebuyer's sweat equity and volunteer labor contributions will receive a higher score.

b. (5 points) Funds Expenditure, Construction, and Completion Schedules. Submit a construction and completion schedule that expends SHOP funds and substantially fulfills your obligations. You must define “substantially fulfills” by stating the percentage or number of properties that you propose to be completed and conveyed to homebuyers at the time all grant funds are expended. Your construction schedule must include the number of dwelling units to be completed within 24 months, or in the case of affiliates that develop five or more units, within 36 months, and a time frame for completing any unfinished units.

Your schedule must also include milestones or benchmarks against which HUD can measure your progress in selecting local affiliates if they are not specifically identified in the application, expending funds, and completing acquisition, infrastructure, and housing construction activities within these schedules. These milestones or benchmarks should be established at reasonable intervals (e.g., monthly, quarterly).

c. (3 points) Need. Describe how your proposed SHOP activities address the need or needs you identified under Rating Factor 2 above.

d. (6 points) Budget. Provide a detailed budget including a break out for each proposed task and each budget category (acquisition, infrastructure improvements, and administration) funded by SHOP in the HUD-424C and 424CB. If SHOP funds will be used for administration of your grant, you must include the cost of monitoring consortium members and affiliates at least once during the grant period. Your budget must also include leveraged funding to cover costs of completing construction of the proposed number of units.

e. (3 points) Cost Effective. Describe how the cost of your proposed SHOP units compare to similar units in the target area(s) that are not funded with SHOP. You must demonstrate that your SHOP costs will not exceed an average of $15,000 per unit, and that your proposed self-help housing activities are cost effective. Applicants should address costs of land, infrastructure, and housing construction for non-SHOP units.

f. (5 points) Policy Priorities. Describe how each of the four Department's policy priorities identified specifically for SHOP is furthered by your proposed activities. You will receive one point for policy priorities (a), (b), and (c) above based on how well your proposed work activities address the specific policy. You will receive up to two points for addressing policy priority (d), Removal of Regulatory Barriers to Affordable Housing, for which you must submit form HUD-27300, Questionnaire for HUD's Initiative on Removal of Regulatory Barriers (see Section V.B.2.g. of the General Section). Applicants that identify affiliate organizations and jurisdictions to be served in their application to HUD should address the questions in Part A or Part B for the jurisdiction in which the majority of services will be performed. Applicants that do not identify affiliates and communities to be served in their application to HUD, but select affiliates competitively or through another method after application submission to HUD, may address this policy priority by including it as an evaluative criterion in their affiliate selection process. Such applicants may receive up to two points by either requiring affiliate applicants for the awarded SHOP funds to complete the questions in Part A or Part B, as appropriate. In order to receive points, applicants that identify affiliates after application submission must include their evaluative criterion as an appendix. This does not count against the page limits identified in section IV.B.1., Page Limits.

g. (3 points) Program Outreach. Describe materials or services that will be used to reach potential homebuyers in all protected classes. For example, what alternative formats will be used to reach persons with a variety of disabilities and what language accommodations will be made for persons with limited English proficiency.

h. (5 points) Homebuyer Selection. Describe your criteria for selecting homebuyers, including the income range of targeted homebuyers, and selection procedures. If the selection criteria used by individual consortium members or affiliates are different from your criteria, you must describe the differences. Specify the definition of annual income that you will use to determine the income eligibility of homebuyers as described in section III.C.2.c. of this NOFA. If a consortium member's or affiliate's definition of annual income is different from your income definition, you must identify the consortium member or affiliate and its definition. For organizations that select affiliates after application submission, you must specify how you will impose this requirement in your selection of affiliates.

i. (5 points) Performance and Monitoring. Describe your plan for overseeing the performance of consortium members and affiliates, including a plan for monitoring each consortium member and affiliate for program compliance at least once during the term of the grant. Your plan should address when and how you will shift funds among consortium members and affiliates to ensure timely and effective use of SHOP funds within the schedule submitted for item b. above.

4. Rating Factor 4: Leveraging Resources (10 Points)

This factor addresses your ability to secure other resources that can be combined with HUD's program resources to fully fund your proposed program. When combined with the SHOP grant funds, homebuyer sweat equity, and volunteer labor, your leveraged resources must be sufficient to develop the number of units proposed in your application. HUD will consider only those leveraging contributions for which current firm commitments as described in this Factor have been provided. A firm commitment means a written agreement under which the applicant, a partner, or an entity agrees to perform services or provide resources for an activity specified in your application. Firm commitments in the form of cash funding (e.g., grants or loans), in-kind contributions, donated land and construction materials, and donated services will count as leverage. Leveraging does not include the dollar value of sweat equity and volunteer labor for your proposed activities. Leveraging does not include financing of mortgages to homebuyers. Firm commitments must be substantiated by the documentation described below.

Submission Requirements for Factor 4

(10 points) Firm Commitments of Resources. Provide firm commitments (letters, agreements, pledges, etc.) of leveraged resources or services from the source of the commitment. In order to be considered, leveraged resources or services must be committed in writing and include your organization's name, the contributing organization's name (including designation as a Federal, state, local, or private source), the proposed type of commitment and dollar value of the commitment as it relates to your proposed activities. Each letter of commitment must be signed by an official of the organization legally able to make the commitment on behalf of the organization. Each letter of commitment must specifically support your FY2004 SHOP application or specific projects in your FY2004 application. If your organization depends upon fundraising and donations from unknown sources/providers you must submit a separate letter committing a specific amount of dollars in fundraising to your proposed FY2004 SHOP program. Likewise, if you have received funds from organizations and agencies from previous years that are not committed to another activity and you have the sole discretion to commit these funds to your FY2004 SHOP program, you must submit a separate letter committing these dollars to your FY2004 SHOP program. Letters of commitment may be contingent upon your receiving a grant award. Letters of commitment must be included as an appendix to your application, and do not count toward the page limitation noted in section IV.B. Letters only expressing support of your organization or its proposal, unsigned, undated, or outdated letters, or those not specifically linking the resources to your FY2004 SHOP application or specific projects in your FY2004 application do not count as firm commitments.

To receive full credit for leveraging, an applicant's leveraging resources must be clearly identified for your FY2004 SHOP application and must total at least 50 percent of the amount needed to complete all properties, minus the proposed SHOP grant amount, homebuyer sweat equity, and volunteer labor.

5. Rating Factor 5. Achieving Results and Program Evaluation (10 points)

This factor emphasizes HUD's determination to track whether applicants meet commitments made in their applications and grant agreements and assess their performance in realizing performance goals. HUD requires SHOP applicants to develop an effective, quantifiable, outcome-oriented evaluation plan for measuring performance and determining whether goals have been met using the Logic Model, Form HUD-96010, provided in the General Section. “Outcomes” are benefits accruing to the families and/or communities during or after participation in the SHOP program. The self-help housing units developed are outputs as described under this Factor, not outcomes. Applicants must clearly identify the outcomes to be achieved and measured. Examples of outcomes include increasing the homeownership rate in a neighborhood or among low-income families by a certain percentage, increasing financial stability (e.g., increasing assets of the low-income homebuyer households through additional savings, home equity) or increasing housing stability (e.g., whether persons and families assisted remain in the home one, two, or five or more years after completion).

In addition, applicants must establish interim benchmarks and outputs for their proposed programs that lead to the ultimate achievement of outcomes. “Outputs” are the direct products of the applicant's program activities. Examples of outputs include the number of the houses constructed, number of sweat-equity hours, or number of homes rehabilitated. Outputs should produce outcomes for your program. “Interim benchmarks” are steps or stages in your activities that, if reached or completed successfully, will result in outputs for your program. Examples of interim benchmarks include income-qualifying homebuyers, obtaining building permits, or securing construction materials and equipment.

Program evaluation requires that you identify program outcomes, outputs, benchmarks, and performance indicators that will allow you to measure your performance. Performance indicators should be objectively quantifiable and measure actual achievements against anticipated achievements. Your evaluation plan should identify what you are going to measure, how you are going to measure it, and the steps you have in place to make adjustments to your work plan if performance targets are not met within established timeframes. This factor reflects HUD's goal to embrace high standards of ethics, management, and accountability.

Submission Requirements for Factor 5

(10 Points) Program Evaluation Plan. Using Logic Model, Form HUD-96010, provided in the General Section, you must submit a program evaluation plan that demonstrates how you will measure your own program performance. Your plan must identify the interim benchmarks, outputs, and outcomes you expect to achieve over the term of your proposed grant including timeframes for accomplishing these goals. Your plan must demonstrate how interim benchmarks relate to outputs, and subsequently to outcomes in your proposed program. Your plan must include performance indicators to measure actual accomplishments against anticipated achievements. You must indicate how your plan will measure the performance of individual consortium members and affiliates, including the standards and measurement methods, and the steps you have in place or how you plan to make adjustments if you begin to fall short of established benchmarks and time frames.

B. Reviews and Selection Process

1. Factors for Award Used To Evaluate Applications

HUD will evaluate all SHOP applications that successfully complete technical processing and meet threshold and submission requirements for Factors 1 through 5. The maximum number of points for this program is 102, which includes two Empowerment Zones/Enterprise Communities/Urban Enhanced Enterprise Communities/or Renewal Communities (RC/EZ/EC) bonus points, as described in section V.A.1.a. of the General Section of the SuperNOFA.

2. Rating

Applications that meet all threshold requirements listed in Section III.C. will be rated against the criteria in Factors 1 through 5 and given a score. Applications that do not meet all threshold factors will be rejected and not rated.

3. Ranking and Selection Procedures

Applications that receive a total rating of 75 points or more (without the addition of RC/EZ/ECs bonus points) will be eligible for selection. RC/EZ/EC bonus points will be awarded as follows: Two points to an applicant with over 25 percent of its proposed units in RC/EZ/ECs; one point for 10 to 25 percent of units in RC/EZ/ECs, and 0 points below 10 percent of units in zones. After adding any bonus points for RC/EZ/ECs, HUD will place applications in rank order. HUD will consider rank order, funds availability, and past performance in the selection and funding of applications.

a. HUD reserves the right to:

(1) Fund less than the amount requested by any applicant based on the application's rank, the applicant's past performance, and the amount of funds requested relative to the total amount of available funds; and

(2) Fund less than the full amount requested by any applicant to ensure a fair distribution of the funds and the development of housing on a national, geographically-diverse basis as required by the statute; and/or

(3) Not award funds to an applicant with significant performance problems.

HUD will not fund any portion of an application that is ineligible for funding under program statutory requirements, or which does not meet the requirements of the General Section of this SuperNOFA or the requirements in this SHOP section of the SuperNOFA. The minimum grant award shall be the amount necessary to complete at least 30 units at an average investment of not more than $15,000 per unit or a lesser amount if lower costs are reflected in the application. If any funds remain after all selections have been made, these funds may be available for other competitions.

VI. Award Administration Information Back to Top

A. Award Notices

Upon selection and public announcement of grant award, successful applicants will receive an award letter stating that they were selected and the award amount. Following this award letter, grantees will receive a letter transmitting a grant agreement and financial documents to set up their lines of credit. The grant agreement must be signed and returned to HUD. Upon receipt of the executed grant agreement, HUD will establish a line of credit for the grantee. Grantees will be notified when they may begin to draw funds. The 24- and 36-month grant periods for grantees to expend funds begin at the time HUD makes funds available to grantees in their lines of credit.

B. Applicant Debriefing

In accordance with the requirements of Section VI.A.3. of the General Section of the SuperNOFA, applicants requesting a debriefing must send a written request to Ms. Lou Thompson, Office of Affordable Housing Programs, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 Seventh Street, SW., Room 7164, Washington, DC 20410-7000.

C. Administrative and National Policy Requirements

1. Environmental Requirements

The provisions contained in section 305(c) of the Multifamily Housing Property Disposition Reform Act of 1994, Environmental Review, implemented in the Environmental Review regulations at 24 CFR part 58, are applicable to properties assisted with SHOP funds. All SHOP assistance is subject to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and related Federal environmental authorities. SHOP grant applicants are cautioned that no activity or project may be undertaken, or Federal or non-Federal funds or assistance committed, if the project or activity would limit reasonable choices or could produce a significant adverse environmental impact until all required environmental reviews and notifications have been completed by a unit of general local government, tribe, or state and until HUD approves a recipient's request for release of funds under the environmental provisions contained in 24 CFR part 58. Not withstanding the preceding sentence, in accordance with section 11(d)(2)(A) of the Housing Opportunity Extension Act of l996 and HUD Notice CPD-01-09, an organization, consortium, or affiliate receiving SHOP assistance may advance non-grant funds to acquire land prior to completion of an environmental review and HUD's approval of a request for release of funds and environmental certification. Any advances to acquire land prior to such approval are made at the risk of the organization, consortium or affiliate and reimbursement from SHOP funds for such advances will depend on the result of the environmental review.

2. HUD Reform Act of 1989

The provisions of the HUD Reform Act of 1989 that apply to this NOFA are explained in the General Section of the SuperNOFA at Section VIII.F.

D. Reporting

Grantees are required to submit quarterly and annual reports providing data on the construction status, unit characteristics, and income and racial and ethnic composition of homeowners in SHOP-funded properties. For each reporting period, as part of the required report to HUD, grant recipients must include a completed Logic Model (form HUD 96010), which identifies output and outcome achievements.

VII. Agency Contact Back to Top

Further Information and Technical Assistance. You may contact Ms. Lou Thompson; Office of Affordable Housing Programs; U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; 451 Seventh Street, SW., Room 7164, Washington, DC 20410-7000; telephone (202) 708-2684 (this is not a toll-free number). This number can be accessed via TTY by calling the toll-free Federal Information Relay Service Operator at 800-877-8339.

Satellite Broadcast. HUD will hold an information broadcast via satellite for potential applicants to learn more about the program and preparation of the application. For more information about the date and time of the broadcast, you should consult the HUD Web site at: http://www.hud.gov/grants.

VIII. Other Information Back to Top

A. Paperwork Reduction Act

The information collection requirements contained in this document have been approved by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501-3520) and assigned OMB control number 2506-0157. In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act, HUD may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to, a collection of information unless the collection displays a currently valid OMB control number. Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 60 hours per annum per respondent for the application and grant administration. This includes the time for collecting, reviewing, and reporting the data for the application, quarterly, and annual report, and final report. The information will be used for grantee selection and monitoring the administration of funds. Response to this request for information is required in order to receive the benefits to be derived.

BILLING CODE 4210-32-P

Youthbuild Back to Top

Overview Information Back to Top

A. Federal Agency Name: Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Community Planning and Development.

B. Funding Opportunity Title: Youthbuild.

C. Announcement Type: Initial announcement.

D. Funding Opportunity Number: The OMB approval number for this program is 2506-0142.

The Federal Register number for this NOFA is FR-4900-N-20. Back to Top

E. Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number(s): 14.243, Youthbuild Program

F. Dates: The application due date is on or before July 2, 2004. Please see the General Section of the SuperNOFA for application submission, delivery, and timely receipt requirements.

G. Additional Overview Content Information:

1. Purpose of the Program. The purpose of the Youthbuild program is to assist disadvantaged young adults in distressed communities in completing their high school education, to provide on-site construction training experiences, which also result in the rehabilitation or construction of housing for homeless persons and low- and very low-income families, to foster leadership skills, to further opportunities for placement in apprenticeship programs, and to promote economic self-sufficiency.

2. Available Funds. Approximately $ 59,397,475 in appropriated funds and carry over is available for Fiscal Year (FY) 2004, plus any funds available through recapture, minus any amount needed to correct errors.

3. Eligible Applicants. Eligible applicants are public or private nonprofit agencies, including grassroots faith-based and other community-based organizations, State or local housing agencies or authorities, State or units of local government, or any entity eligible to provide education and employment training under other Federal employment training programs, as further defined in HUD's regulation at 24 CFR 585.4.

4. Match. None

If you are interested in applying for funding under this program, please carefully review the General Section of the SuperNOFA and the following additional information.

Full Text of Announcement Back to Top

I. Funding Opportunity Description Back to Top

A. Program Description

The purposes of the Youthbuild Program are to:

1. Provide economically disadvantaged young adults with opportunities to obtain an educational experience that will enhance their employment skills, as a means to achieving self-sufficiency;

2. Foster the development of leadership skills and commitment to community;

3. Expand the supply of permanent affordable housing for homeless and low- and very low-income persons by providing implementation grants for carrying out a Youthbuild program;

4. Provide disadvantaged young adults with meaningful on-site training experiences in housing construction and rehabilitation that will enable them to render a service to their communities by helping to meet the housing needs of homeless persons and low-income families; and

5. Give to the greatest extent possible, job training, employment, contracting and other economic opportunities to low-income young adults.

B. Desirable Elements of a Youthbuild Program

You should document the extent to which HUD's initiatives are furthered by the proposed activities. Such initiatives include:

1. Providing increased homeownership and rental opportunities for low- and moderate- income persons, persons with disabilities, the elderly, minorities, and families with limited English proficiency;

2. Improving our nation's communities;

3. Encouraging accessible design features;

4. Providing full and equal access to grassroots faith-based and other community based organizations in HUD program implementation; and

5. Ending chronic homelessness within ten years.

C. Authority

This program is authorized under subtitle D of title IV of the Cranston-Gonzalez National Affordable Housing Act, as added by section 164 of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1992 (102, 106 Stat. 3723, 42 U.S.C. 12899). The Youthbuild Program regulations are found in 24 CFR part 585.

II. Award Information Back to Top

A. Available Funds

Approximately $59,397,475 in Fiscal Year (FY) 2004 funding and carry over will be made available through this program section of this SuperNOFA for the Youthbuild program. The breakdown of funding is discussed below.

B. The FY2004 HUD Appropriations Act

The Department of Veterans Affairs and Housing and Urban Development, and Independent Agencies Appropriations Act, 2004 (the “FY 2004 HUD Appropriations Act”) made $64,616,500 available of which $59,397,475 is allocated for grants.

C. Funding Categories

HUD will award up to $59,397,475 on a competitive basis. Funds will be divided among three categories of grants as described below. In each fiscal year, the Secretary shall reserve five percent of the amounts available for technical assistance activities under this subtitle pursuant to section 402 to carry out subsections (b) and (c), (Subtitle D-Hope for Youth: Section 458 (42 U.S.C. 12899g).

1. Category 1 Grants. New Applicants. HUD will award up to $10,000,000 for new applicants that have not previously received implementation grants since the inception of the Youthbuild Program and that have elected not to apply under Category 2 or 3. The maximum amount that may be awarded to a successful applicant in this category is $400,000, for a period not to exceed 30 months.

2. Category 2 Grants. Grants up to $700,000. HUD will award up to $39,456,475 for grants up to $700,000 for a period not to exceed 30 months. The maximum amount that may be awarded to a successful applicant in this category is $700,000. Any eligible applicant can apply in Category 2.

3. Category 3 Grants. Underserved and Rural Areas. HUD will award up to $ 9,941,000 (includes $10,000,000 in appropriated funds, less .59 percent rescission) for grants to organizations serving clients in underserved and rural areas as defined in this NOFA for a period not to exceed 30 months. The maximum amount that may be awarded to a successful applicant in this category is $400,000. Rural and Underserved areas are defined as follows:

a. Rural Area. A rural area is defined in one of five ways:

(1) A place having fewer than 2,500 inhabitants (within or outside of metropolitan areas).

(2) A county with an urban population of 20,000 inhabitants or fewer.

(3) Rural portions of extended cities, as identified by the U.S. Census Bureau.

(4) Open country, which is not part of or associated with an urban area. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) describes “open country” as a site separated by open space from any adjacent densely populated urban area. Open space includes undeveloped land, agricultural land or sparsely settled areas but does not include physical barriers (such as rivers and canals), public parks, commercial and industrial developments, small areas reserved for recreational purposes, and open space set aside for future development.

(5) Any place with a population not in excess of 20,000 and not located in a Metropolitan Statistical Area.

b. Underserved Area. An underserved area is defined as an area comprised of census tracts with the following distress criteria:

(1) A census tract where the unemployment remains high (50 percent or more above the nation's unemployment rate) and

(2) A census tract where high rates of poverty (50 percent or more above the national average) persists.

Applicants must indicate on their transmittal/cover letter which funding category they are applying for.

4. Grant Period. You must expend funds awarded within 30 months of the effective date of the grant agreement.

5. Maximum Awards. Under the competition established by this Youthbuild program section of the SuperNOFA, the maximum award for a Youthbuild grant is $700,000.

III. Eligibility Information Back to Top

A. Eligible Applicants

Eligible applicants are public or private nonprofit agencies, including grassroots faith-based and other community-based organizations, State or local housing agencies or authorities, states or units of local government, or any entity eligible to provide education and employment training under other Federal employment training programs.

B. Cost Sharing or Matching

Under the Youthbuild program, there is no match required. Applicants that submit evidence of leveraging dollars under Rating Factor 4 “Leveraging Resources” will receive points under that factor.

C. Other

1. Eligible Activities

a. Work and activities associated with the acquisition, architectural and engineering work, rehabilitation or construction of housing, as defined in HUD's regulations at 24 CFR 585.309, 585.310, and 585.311.

b. Relocation payments and other assistance required to comply with HUD's regulation at 24 CFR 585.308;

c. Costs of ongoing training and technical assistance needs related to carrying out a Youthbuild program;

d. Education, job training, counseling, employment, leadership development services, and optional activities that meet the needs of the participants including entrepreneurial training, driver education, apprenticeship opportunities, financial literacy, credit counseling, assistance programs for those with learning disabilities, and in-house staff training;

e. Outreach to potential participants;

f. Wages, benefits, and need-based stipends for participants; and

g. Pursuant to the FY2004 HUD Appropriations Act, administrative costs must not exceed 10 percent of the grant award. HUD encourages you to use grant funds for outreach, recruitment, training, and other services for the participants that facilitate program implementation. Please refer to HUD's regulation at 24 CFR 585.305 for further details on eligible activities.

2. Threshold Requirements

a. Eligible Participants. Participants in a Youthbuild program must be very low-income high school dropouts between the ages of 16 and 24, inclusive, at the time of enrollment. Up to 25 percent of participants may be above very low-income, or may be high school graduates (or equivalent), but must have educational needs (such as lack of reading, writing, and communication skills) that justify their participation in the program.

b. Youthbuild Program Components. Applications that receive assistance under this Youthbuild program section of the SuperNOFA must contain the three components described as follows:

(1) Educational and job training services;

(2) Leadership training, counseling, and other support activities; and

(3) On-site training through actual housing rehabilitation and/or new construction work. (New construction may be subject to the accessible design and construction requirements of the Fair Housing Act (see the General Section of the SuperNOFA), including the provision of alternative training experiences that are necessary as a reasonable accommodation for students with disabilities.)

c. Identification of and Access to Property. Your application must identify the location of the site(s) or property(ies) (e.g., addresses, parcel numbers, etc.) that will be used for on-site construction. Your application MUST contain a letter from the property owner or property management company(ies) allowing access to the housing site(s) for on-site construction training. HUD may deem as ineligible any application that fails to specifically identify the location of the on-site construction. Guidance on evidence of site access is as follows:

(1) If the applicant or joint applicant has a contract or option to purchase the property, you should include a copy of the contract or option; and

(2) If a third party owns the property or has a contract or option to purchase, that third party must provide a letter to you stating the nature of the ownership and specifically providing you with access to the property for the purposes of the program and the time frame in which the property will be available. In the case of a contract or option, include a copy of the document.

d. Minimum Score. In order to be considered eligible for funding, your application must receive a minimum score of 75, including a minimum of 10 points in Factor 1.

3. Program Requirements

a. Locational Limitations. You may submit more than one application in the current competition if your program's participant recruitment and housing areas are in different jurisdictions. Each application you submit may only propose activities to carry out one Youthbuild program, i.e., to start a new Youthbuild program or to fund new classes of Youthbuild participants for an existing program.

b. Site Selection—In determining the site or the location of a federally assisted facility, the applicant may not select sites that will exclude qualified persons with disabilities, or otherwise subject them to discrimination under the Youthbuild program.

c. New Construction—Substantial Alterations—Other Alterations. If the applicant undertakes to participate in New Construction, Substantial Alterations, or Other Alterations, it must conform to the accessibility standards outlined in the regulations implementing the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 at 24 CFR part 8, §§ 8.22, 8.23(a) and § 8.23(b).

d. Training Requirement. Each program must be structured so that 50 percent of each participant's time is spent in on-site training and the other 50 percent in educational training.

e. Economic Opportunities for Low- and Very Low-Income Persons (Section 3). Section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968, (12 U.S.C. 1701u) is applicable to the Youthbuild program. Please see the General Section of the SuperNOFA.

f. Participation in Local Workforce Investment Act One-Stop Center. Youthbuild grantees are mandatory partners in one-stop centers authorized by the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (Public Law 105-220).

g. First time applicants. If you are a first-time applicant applying for funding under Category 1, you must have a graduating class of not more than 20 participants.

h. Potential Environmental Disqualification. HUD reserves the right to disqualify an application where one or more environmental thresholds are exceeded if HUD determines that it cannot conduct the environmental review and satisfactorily complete the review within the HUD application review period. (See 24 CFR 585.307.) Environmental thresholds are explained in Appendix A of this program section of the SuperNOFA. Complete form 2C13a, 2C13b or 2C13c and form 2C15 only if you are proposing to use Youthbuild funds for new housing construction or rehabilitation.

i. Environmental Reviews. Environmental procedures apply to HUD approval of grants when you propose to use Youthbuild funds to cover any costs for the lease, acquisition, rehabilitation, or new construction of real property proposed for housing project development. Environmental procedures do not apply to HUD approval of your application when you propose to use your Youthbuild funds solely to cover costs for classroom and/or on-the-job construction training and support services.

If you propose to use your Youthbuild funds to cover any costs of the lease, acquisition, rehabilitation, or new construction of real property, you must submit all relevant environmental information in your application to support HUD decisionmaking in accordance with the environmental procedures and standards set forth in HUD's regulation at 24 CFR 585.307.

j. DUNS Requirement. Refer the General Section of the SuperNOFA for information regarding the DUNS requirement. You will need to obtain a DUNS number to receive an award from HUD.

k. Consistency with Consolidated Plan. You must provide the required certification that the proposed activities are consistent with the HUD-approved Consolidated Plan in accordance with 24 CFR part 91 and referenced in the General Section of the SuperNOFA. Youthbuild applicants will be rated on this certification under Rating Factor 2, subfactor (d).

l. Category 3 applicants only. You must state that the proposed project to be established will be located in an underserved and rural area as defined in Section II.C. of this program section of the SuperNOFA.

m. Funding Restrictions. Administrative costs must not exceed 10 percent of the grant award.

IV. Application and Submission Information Back to Top

A. Addresses To Request Application Package

There is no application kit for the FY2004 Youthbuild NOFA. This SuperNOFA clearly describes the requirements for completing a successful application and all forms and certifications needed to complete the application are included in the General and Youthbuild Sections of the SuperNOFA.

B. Content and Form of Application Submission

1. Response to NOFA—Page Limitation. The total narrative response to all factors identified in Section V of this program NOFA must not exceed 15 pages, and must be submitted on 8.5 by 11 inch paper, using a standard 12 point font, with lines double-spaced and printed only on one side. Please note that submitting pages in excess of the page limit will not disqualify your application. However, HUD will not review or consider the information on any excess pages, which may result in a lower score or failure to meet a threshold.

2. Application Items. Your application must contain the items listed in this section. These items include the standard forms, certifications, and assurances listed in the General Section of the SuperNOFA that are applicable to this funding (collectively referred to as the “standard forms”). The standard forms can be found in Appendix A to the General Section of the SuperNOFA.

What to submit Required content Required form or format When to submit it
*These forms are required only if the applicant proposes to use Youthbuild funds for any part of acquisition, construction, or rehabilitation costs.
Transmittal Letter Category applying for Location of project; Number of participants; Number of houses to be constructed; Number of houses to be rehabbed; Major partners None On or before July 2, 2004.
Application SF-424  
Survey on Ensuring Equal Opportunity for Applicants SF-424 supplement  
Budget information Total Youthbuild Grant Budget Youthbuild Form 4A  
Rating Factors: Narrative plus Exhibit 4B plus Logic Model Form Described in Section V of this announcement    
Assurances (per required form) HUD-424B  
Applicant/Recipient Disclosure/Update Form (per required form) HUD-2880  
Disclosure of Lobby Activities (if necessary) SF-LLL  
Certification of Consistency with RC/EZ/EC Strategic Plan HUD-2990  
Certification of Consistency with Consolidated Plan HUD-2991  
Acknowledgment of Application Receipt HUD-2993  
Client Comments and Suggestions HUD-2994  
Youthbuild Program Specific Forms* HUD-40211  
Exhibit 2C (Housing Site Description)      
Exhibit 2C10 (Individual Housing Project Site Estimate)      
*Exhibit 2C13a (Housing Project Certifications for Residential Rental Units)      
*Exhibit 2C13b (Housing Project Certifications for Transitional Housing)      
*Exhibit 2C13c (Housing Project Certifications for Homeownership)      
*Exhibit 2C15 (Environmental Threshold Information for a Property Proposed for YB Funding)      
Exhibit 4B (Non-Housing Program Resources)      
Logic Model Form HUD-96010  
Site Access Letters      

C. Submission Dates and Times

The application due date shall be on July 2, 2004. Please see the General Section of the SuperNOFA for application submission, delivery, and timely receipt requirements.

D. Other Submission Requirements

1. Address for Submitting Applications. Completed applications (one original signed application and two copies) must be submitted to: HUD Headquarters, Robert C. Weaver Federal Building, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 Seventh Street, SW., Room 7251, Washington, DC 20410; Attention: Youthbuild Program. When submitting your application, please include your name, mailing address (including Zip code), telephone number, and fax number (including area code). Also, please submit one copy of your complete application to the Community Planning and Development office that has jurisdiction for your program project area (refer to Appendix C to find your appropriate CPD office and address).

2. Application and Submission Information. Please refer to General Section of the SuperNOFA for information.

V. Application Review Information Back to Top

The factors for rating and ranking applicants, and maximum points for each factor, are provided below. The maximum number of points for the program is 102. This includes two RC/EZ/EC bonus points, as described in the General Section of the SuperNOFA. The minimum fundable score is 75, including a minimum of 10 points in Factor 1.

Rating Factor 1: Capacity of the Applicant and Relevant Organizational Experience (20 Points, Minimum 10 Points)

This factor addresses the qualifications and experience of the applicant and participating parties to implement a successful young adult education training program in accordance with your work plan as further described in Factor 3. HUD will review and evaluate information provided documenting recent capability. Experience within the last 5 years will be considered recent. In addition, as described in the General Section of the SuperNOFA, HUD will take into account the applicant's past performance and may deduct points in this rating factor for previous inability to demonstrate performance. In reviewing this rating factor, HUD will evaluate the following sub-factors:

1. Team Member Composition and Experience (5 points). Your experience and the experience of your project director, core staff competencies including your day-to-day program manager, consultants, and contractors. You must demonstrate that your program manager has the background, experience, and capacity to implement all of the program components of the proposed work plan, as evidenced by recent work experience (within the last 5 years) in managing projects of the same or similar size, dollar amount, types of activities, and beneficiaries as those proposed in your work plan. If any gaps exist in your experience or organizational structure to carry out the program, describe how you will fill those gaps including the hiring of consultants or other outside parties.

2. Organizational Structure (5 points). The structure of your organization (include an organizational chart), management structure, including reporting relationships of key staff, a system for coordinating with outside contractors or third party service providers, a mechanism for an internal and external auditing relationship, and an accounting system which meets federal accounting system requirements. You should provide a clear description of how your organizational structure will operate to carry out your work plan.

3. Achievement of Performance Outcomes (10 points). The objectives and accomplishments of your past experience in conducting similar activities. You must describe your past project objectives and accomplishments that are similar to those of your proposed work plan to show your effectiveness and timeliness in managing similar projects. If you have received similar grants including previous Youthbuild grants, you must describe the effectiveness of your administration, including timeliness and meeting performance results from performance reports. In addressing timeliness of reports, you must compare when your reports were due with when they were actually submitted. You must describe your achievements, including specific measurable outcome objectives: number of youths recruited, trained, and received GEDs; number of youths obtaining jobs (i.e., those that are a part of a career path or apprenticeship program); number of youths participating in apprenticeships and number of housing units rehabilitated or constructed and made available for low- and very low-income persons (1) percent entered employment or enrolled in education and/or training first quarter after program exit, (2) percent of participants that earned a diploma, GED, or certificate, (3) percent that have attained literacy and numeracy skills by participants, (4) annual cost per participant.

Also, you must describe the extent to which you or participating partners have been successful in past education, training and employment programs and activities, including federally funded Youthbuild programs. If you have received a Youthbuild grant, you must submit copies of your last two progress reports or, if applicable, a closeout report. In applying the rating criteria, HUD will take into consideration your performance (including meeting target dates and schedules) as reported.

The more recent, relevant, and successful the experience of the proposed team members, organization and other participating entities in relation to the work plan, the greater the number of points that you will receive. For previous and existing Youthbuild grantees, applicants that can demonstrate a closer and greater linkage between the expected outcomes and the previously generated outcomes will receive a higher amount of points for this Factor. Previous and existing Youthbuild grantees' semi-annual reports will also be used to evaluate and score this subfactor.

Rating Factor 2: Need/Extent of the Problem (23 Points)

This Factor addresses the extent to which there is need for funding the proposed activities based on levels of distress and an indication of the urgency of meeting the need/distress in the applicant's target area. In responding to this Factor, applications will be evaluated on the extent to which the level of need for the proposed activity and the urgency in meeting the need are documented and compared to the target area and national data.

1. In applying this Factor, HUD will consider current levels of distress for the area (i.e., Census Tract(s) or Block Groups) immediately surrounding the project site or the target area to be served by the proposed project, and in the nation. This means that an application that provides data that show levels of distress in the target area expressed as a percent greater than the national average will be rated higher under this Factor.

Notwithstanding the above, an applicant proposing a project to be located outside the target area could still receive points under the Distress Factor if a clear rationale and linkage is provided linking the proposed project location and the benefits to be derived by persons living in more distressed area(s) of the applicant's target area.

2. Applicants should provide data that address indicators of distress, as follows:

a. Poverty (5 points)—data should be provided in both absolute and percentage form (i.e., whole numbers and percentages) for the target area(s); an application that compares the local poverty rate in the following manner to the national average at the time of submission will receive points under this section as follows:

(1) Less than the national average—0 points.

(2) Equal to but less than twice the national average—1 points.

(3) Twice but less than three times the national average—3 points.

(4) Three or more times the national average—5 points.

b. Unemployment (5 points)—for the project area;

(1) Less than the national average—0 points.

(2) Equal to but less than twice the national average —1 point.

(3) Twice but less than three times the national average— 2 points.

(4) Three but less than four times the national average—3 points.

(5) Four but less than five times the national average—4 points.

(6) Five or more times the national average—5 points.

c. High School Dropouts (10 points)—for the project area;

(1) Less than the national average—0 points.

(2) Equal to but less than twice the national average—2 points.

(3) Twice but less than three times the national average—4 points.

(4) Three but less than four times the national average—6 points.

(5) Four but less than five times the national average— 8 points.

(6) Five or more times the national average—10 points.

d. Concrete examples of social and/or economic decline that best capture the applicant's local situation (3 points). Examples that could be provided under this section are information on the community's stagnant or falling tax base, including recent commercial or industrial closings, housing conditions, such as the number and percentage of substandard and/or overcrowded units, rent burden (defined as average housing cost divided by average income) for the target area and urgency in addressing problems facing youth, local crime statistics, etc.

3. In rating applications under this Factor, HUD reserves the right to consider sources of available objective data, such as the U.S. Census, other than, or in addition to, those provided by applicants, and to compare such data to those provided by applicants and local crime statistics for the project site.

HUD requires use of sound and reliable data (e.g., U.S. Census data, state statistical reports, university studies/reports that are verifiable) to support distress levels cited in each application. A source for all information along with the publication or origination date must also be provided. Updated Census data are available as follows for the listed indicators:

a. Unemployment rate—estimated monthly, with a two-month lag;

b. High School Dropout rate;

c. Poverty rate—2001—data being the most recent available.

Rating Factor 3: Soundness of Approach (35 Points)

This factor addresses the extent to which your proposed program is coordinated with other ongoing and related activities in the area you propose to serve and how well your program outcomes result in increased independence and empowerment to your beneficiaries at the conclusion of the grant period. HUD will evaluate the extent to which your application meets the following three elements:

A. Coordination Elements—5 points as distributed below.

1. Coordination of activities (2 points). The extent to which you have coordinated your activities with other known organizations that are not directly in your proposed work activities, but with which you share common goals and objectives and are working toward meeting these objectives in a holistic and comprehensive manner. The goal of coordination is to ensure that programs do not operate in isolation. The more your activities are coordinated with other agencies in your service area, the more points you will receive. HUD will consider your signed Certification of Consistency with the Consolidated Plan in evaluating this subfactor. An example of coordination of activities would be the applicant's partnership with an existing child day care facility (which is not funded by program) that provides day care services to the Youthbuild participants during the hours they are being trained or receiving education.

2. Self-Sufficiency (1 point). The extent to which your application implements practical solutions within the grant term that result in assisting beneficiaries of grant program funds in achieving independent living, economic empowerment, educational opportunities, housing choice or improved environments which are free from environmental hazards such as lead hazards, brownfields, overcrowded housing, etc. Applicants that clearly describe the extent to which proposed activities result in increased independence and empowerment for their beneficiaries will receive higher points in this sub-factor.

3. Sustainability (2 points). The extent to which your program exhibits the potential to be financially self-sustaining by decreasing dependence on Youthbuild funding and relying more on state, local, and private funding so your activities can be continued after your grant award is complete. Applicants that demonstrate a reduced dependence on Youthbuild funds over the life of their award will receive a greater number of points for this sub-factor.

B. Youthbuild Program Work Plan. For each component, HUD will consider the overall quality and feasibility of your proposed work plan and budget that must be consistent with the Youthbuild program as measured by your specific activities and outcomes. You will receive a greater number of points if the program components are consistent with the purpose of the Youthbuild program and your project goals and the resources provided. Letters describing specific resources or services to be contributed by non-applicant organizations must be included in your application.

Specifically, HUD will consider the following categories when assessing your proposed work plan:

1. Program Components. (15 points)

a. Outreach strategy, recruitment strategy and selection activities. Points will be awarded based upon overall quality and feasibility of the outreach, recruitment and selection activities, the number and types of outreach activities, number of youths to be recruited including eligible participants who are harder to reach and comprehensiveness of the local selection process.

In evaluating this category, HUD will consider your selection strategies and your specific outreach efforts to recruit or contact:

(1) (Potential eligible participants who are unlikely to be aware of this program (because of race, color, national origin, religion, ethnicity, sex or disability);

(2) Young women, young women with dependent children, and persons receiving public assistance; and

(3) Public agencies, courts, homeless shelters, local school systems, local workforce development systems, one-stop centers and community-based organizations, etc.

b. Educational and job training services and activities.

Points will be awarded based upon the qualifications of instructors and proposed wages and stipends for youth participants. In evaluating this category, HUD will consider:

(1) The types of in-class academic and vocational instruction you will provide;

(2) The number and qualifications of program instructors and ratio of instructors to participants;

(3) Scheduling plan for classroom and on-the-job training needed to meet program requirements and ensure timely completion of your program; and

(4) Reasonable payments of participants' wages, stipends, and incentives. Amounts must be at least federal minimum wage.

c. Leadership development. Points will be awarded based upon your proposed leadership curriculum, qualifications of instructors, and the impact of the proposed leadership activities on the target area. You must describe the leadership development training you will offer to participants and strategies for providing the training to build group cohesion and peer support.

d. Support services.

You must assess the need for counseling and referral services during each stage of program implementation: Outreach strategy, recruitment strategy, youths interviewed and not selected for the program, program participants, youths who drop out of the program, and graduates of the program. Describe how the participant needs will be addressed, document counseling and referral services to be offered to participants, the type of counseling, social services, and/or need-based stipends you will provide.

e. Follow-up assistance and support activities to program graduates. You must describe the type of proposed assistance and support which should be based upon an assessment of the needs of the program graduates and should include continued linkage to the local Youthbuild program, counseling and social service referral services.

f. On-site training. Points will be awarded based upon the experience of proposed instructors, number of youth to be trained and wages or stipends for participants. HUD will consider:

(1) The housing construction or rehabilitation activities participants will undertake at the site(s) to be used for the on-site training component of the program as provided in the training curriculum and methodology for carrying out on-site training;

(2) The qualification and number of on-site supervisors;

(3) The ratio of trainers to participants;

(4) The number of participants per site; and

(5) The amounts, wages, and/or stipends you will pay to participants during on-site work.

Amounts must be at least federal minimum wage.

2. Strategy for Job Placement. (2 points). HUD will evaluate the quality and feasibility of your proposed strategy to place youth participants in permanent jobs.

You will be rated on the following factors: (a) Proposed number of youth to obtain jobs that promote economic self-sufficiency (i.e., those that are a part of career paths or apprenticeship programs); (b) proposed number of youths who will continue post-secondary or secondary education; and (c) proposed number of youths to receive entrepreneurship training. Two points of this factor will be awarded based upon the comprehensiveness and feasibility of your strategies and procedures to place youth participants in related apprenticeships and commitments from construction trade unions.

C. Housing Program Priority. (10 points). HUD will assign Housing Program Priority points to all applications that contain evidence that housing resources from other federal, state, local, or private sources are available and firmly committed to cover all costs, in full, for the following housing activities for the proposed Youthbuild program: acquisition, architect and engineering fees, construction, and rehabilitation. Applications that do not include proper documentation of firm financial commitments of non-Youthbuild resources or propose to use Youthbuild grant funds, in whole or in part, or do not evidence site control, for any one of the housing activities listed above will not be entitled to housing program priority points. For all applicants to receive the housing program priority points, each letter of commitment to cover the costs of the above activities must include the organization's name, the applicant's name, the proposed program, and the proposed level of commitment. The commitment letter must also be signed by an official of the organization legally able to make commitments on behalf of the organization and not earlier than the date that this NOFA is published. In documenting a firm commitment the applicant, the applicant's partner(s) or contributing entity (if the contribution is cash) must:

1. Specify the authority by which the commitment is made, the amount of the commitment and the use of funds. If the committed activity is to be self-financed, the applicant's partner or contributing entity must evidence its financial capability through a corporate or personal financial statement or other appropriate means. If any portion of the committed activity is to be financed through a lending institution, the participant must evidence the institution's commitment to fund the commitment.

2. State the amount and use of the commitment, and the relationship of the commitment to the proposed investment; and

3. Affirm that its investment is contingent only upon receipt of FY2004 Youthbuild funds and state a willingness on the part of the signatory to sign a legally binding commitment not earlier than the date this NOFA is published and (conditioned on HUD's environmental review and approval of a property, where applicable) upon award of the grant. Forms 2C, Housing Site Description, and 2C10, Youthbuild Grant Individual Housing Project Site Estimate, must be completed to receive the Housing Program Priority points.

D. Policy Priorities. (3 points). Policy Priorities are further defined in the General Section of the SuperNOFA. Applicants should document the extent HUD's policy priorities are enhanced by the proposed activities. Applicants that include activities that can result in the achievement of these departmental policy priorities, as described below and the General Section of this SuperNOFA, will receive higher rating points in evaluating their application for funding. Two departmental policy priorities are listed below. Policy Priorities include:

1. Ending chronic homelessness within ten years (1 point);

2. Removal of regulatory barriers to affordable housing (up to 2 points) (see the General Section of the SuperNOFA for further explanation);

Rating Factor 4: Leveraging Resources (10 Points)

(Exhibit 4B Non-Housing Program Resources must be completed and you must provide letters of firm commitment from the donor with the amount of cash or in-kind contribution). Applicants submitting letters of commitment without the Exhibit 4 completed, will not receive points for this Rating Factor. This factor addresses the ability of the applicant to secure non-HUD resources. This factor measures the extent to which you have established partnerships with other entities to secure resources for your proposed program. Each commitment described on Exhibit 4B for this Factor must have a firm commitment letter. Grantees who leverage significant resources will receive a greater number of points.

HUD will evaluate the extent to which firm commitments of resources are obtained from federal, state, local, private and nonprofit sources. HUD will award a greater number of points based upon a comparison of the extent of leveraged funds and the requested Youthbuild grant. The greater the amount of resources leveraged, the higher the points that will be awarded. In assigning points for this criterion, HUD will consider the level of resources obtained for cash or in-kind contributions to cover the following kinds of areas:

1. Social services (i.e., counseling and training);

2. Use of existing vocational, adult, and bilingual educational courses;

3. Donation of labor, resource personnel, supplies, teaching materials, classroom, and/or meeting space; and

4. Other commitments. Leveraging will only be counted if you have secured a current firm financial commitment. A firm commitment letter means an agreement by which an applicant, an applicant's partner or contributing entity agrees to perform an activity specified in the application and commits the resources to the activity either in cash, through in-kind services or contributions and is irrevocable, subject only to approval and receipt of a FY2004 Youthbuild grant.

For all applicants, each letter of commitment must include the organization's name, the applicant's name, the proposed program, the proposed total level of commitment, and responsibilities as they relate to the proposed program. The commitment letter must also be signed by an official of the organization legally able to make commitments on behalf of the organization and not earlier than the date that this NOFA is published.

5. Resources from other Federal, State, local governments or private entities. HUD encourages use of existing housing and homeless assistance programs administered by HUD or other Federal, State, local governments, or private and nonprofit housing programs as part of your Youthbuild program. In addition, HUD encourages use of other non-Youthbuild funds available for vocational, adult, and bilingual education programs, or for job training under the Workforce Investment Act and the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (48 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.).

Rating Factor 5: Achieving Results and Program Evaluation (12 Points)

This factor emphasizes HUD's commitment to ensuring that applicants keep promises made in their application to rigorously assess their performance and ensure performance goals are met. Achieving results means you, the applicant, have clearly identified the benefits, or outcomes of your program. Outcomes are ultimate goals. Benchmarks or outputs are interim activities or products that lead to the ultimate achievement of your goals. Performance measurement requires that you, the applicant, identify program outcomes, interim products or benchmarks, and performance indicators that will allow you to assess your performance. Performance indicators must be quantified and measure actual achievements against anticipated achievements. You should identify what you are going to measure, how you are going to measure it, and the steps you have in place to make adjustments to your work plan if performance targets are not met within established timeframes. Applicants are required to address this factor as a narrative as well as complete the Logic Model form (see appendix to the General Section). This rating factor reflects HUD's goal to embrace high standards of ethics, management and accountability.

An applicant should agree to cooperate with any HUD-approved evaluation by making staff available for interview, providing lists of participants and their contact information, and making available files under appropriate assurance of confidentiality of records.

At a minimum, your Logic Model must include the following program outcomes:

(1) Number of participants enrolled in the program;

(2) Number of participants that graduate;

(3) Number of housing units constructed;

(4) Number of housing units rehabilitated;

(5) Number and percent of GED's or certificates attained by participants (for percentage calculation, numerator: the number of participants who attain a diploma, GED or certificate; denominator: those who are participating in the Youthbuild program).

(6) Number and percent of participants placed in employment or education (for percentage calculation, numerator: the number of participants who have entered employment or enrolled in post secondary education; denominator: the number of graduates from the Youthbuild program); and

(7) Number and percentage of participants who made literacy and numeracy gains (measures the increase in literacy and numeracy skills of participants through a common assessment tool administered at program registration and regular intervals thereafter); for percentage calculation, numerator: the number of Youthbuild program participants who increase one or more education functioning levels; denominator: the number of Youthbuild program participants who have completed a year in the program).

(8) Efficiency or annual cost per participant (numerator: grant amount; denominator: number of Youthbuild participants.)

B. Reviews and Selection Process

1. Rating and Ranking. a. General. To review and rate applications, HUD may establish panels including officials from other Federal agencies and outside experts or consultants to obtain certain expertise and other outside points of view. In evaluating applications for funding, HUD will take into account an applicant's past performance in managing funds, including the ability to account for funds appropriately, timely use of funds received either from HUD or from other Federal, State or local programs and meeting performance targets for completion of activities and number of persons served or targeted for assistance. HUD may use information relating to these items based on information at hand or available from public sources such as newspapers, Inspector General, or Government Accounting Office Reports or Findings, hotline complaints that have been proven to have merit, or other such sources of information.

b. Rating. All applications for funding will be evaluated against the rating factors described in Section V. of this NOFA.

c. Ranking. Applications will be ranked separately within each of the three funding categories. Applications will be selected for funding in accordance with their rank order in each category.

2. Eligibility for Selection. To be eligible for funding, an application must have an overall minimum score of 75 points, including a minimum score of 10 points in Factor 1. If two or more applications are rated fundable and have the same score, but there are insufficient funds to fund all of them, HUD will select the application(s) with the highest score for Rating Factor 3 (Soundness of Approach). If two or more applications still have the same score, the highest score in the following factors will be selected sequentially until one highest score can be determined: Rating Factor 1 (Capacity of the Applicant and Relevant Organization); Rating Factor 4 (Leveraging of Resources) and Rating Factor 2 (Need/Extent of the Problem).

3. Adjustments to Funding. HUD reserves the right to utilize this year's funding to fund previous years' errors prior to rating and ranking this year's applications. HUD reserves the right to reallocate funds between categories to achieve the maximum allocation of funds. Any available funds that remain after all applications within funding range have been selected or obligated will be reallocated between categories 1 and 2 by rank order between applications at the discretion of the selecting official or designee.

4. Corrections to Deficient Applications. The General Section of the SuperNOFA provides the procedures for corrections to deficient applications.

C. Anticipated Announcement and Award Dates

HUD anticipates making award announcements no later than four months after the application submission deadline date.

VI. Award Administration Information Back to Top

A. Award Notices

1. Notification of Approval or Disapproval. HUD will notify you whether or not you have been selected for an award. If you are selected, HUD's notice to you of the amount of the grant award based on the approved application will constitute HUD's CONDITIONAL approval, subject to negotiation and execution of the grant agreement by HUD.

2. Application Debriefing. Applicants requesting to be debriefed must send a written or email request (see the General Section of the SuperNOFA) to: Mr. Marty Horwath, Director; Youthbuild Program; Office of Economic Development; Office of Community Planning and Development, 451 Seventh Street, SW., Room 7218, Washington, DC 20410-7000. Debriefing information can be found in the General Section of the SuperNOFA.

B. Administrative and National Policy Requirements

1. Applicable OMB Circulars. Please refer to the General Section of the SuperNOFA for information regarding applicable OMB Circulars.

2. Applicable Executive Orders. Please note that Executive Order 13202 may apply to your program (see the General Section of the SuperNOFA) and section 6002 of the Solid Waste Disposal Act covering the procurement of recovered materials may also be applicable (the General Section of the SuperNOFA. Also, refer to the General Section of the SuperNOFA for applicable Executive Orders.

VII. Agency Contact(s) Back to Top

For information concerning the HUD Youthbuild program, contact Ms. Phyllis Williams, Community Planning and Development Specialist, Office of Economic Development, Office of Community Planning and Development, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 Seventh Street, SW., Room 7218, Washington, DC 20410-7000; telephone (202) 708-2290 (this is not a toll-free number). Persons with speech or hearing impairments may access this number via TTY by calling the toll-free Federal Information Relay Service at 800-877-8339. For Technical Assistance. Prior to the application deadline, HUD's staff will be available to provide general guidance on the application submission process and location of information, but not guidance in preparing your application.

Satellite Broadcast. HUD will hold an information broadcast via satellite for potential applicants to learn more about the program and preparation of an application. For more information about the date and time of this broadcast, you should consult the HUD Web site at http://www.hud.gov.

Paperwork Reduction Act: The information collection requirements contained in this document have been approved by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501-3520) and assigned OMB control number 2506.0142. In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act, HUD may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to, a collection of information unless the collection displays a currently valid OMB control number. Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 45 hours per annum per respondent for the application and grant administration. This includes the time for collecting, reviewing, and reporting the data for the application, semi-annual reports, and final report. The information will be used for grantee selection and monitoring the administration of funds. Response to this request for information is required in order to receive the benefits to be derived.

Appendix A—Instructions for Completion of Youthbuild Environmental Requirements (Exhibit 2C(15)) Back to Top

A. Instructions to Applicants

1. If you propose to use Youthbuild funds to cover any costs of the lease, acquisition, rehabilitation, or new construction or real property, you shall submit all relevant environmental information in your application to support HUD decision making in accordance with the environmental procedures and standards described in 24 CFR 585.307. For each proposed Youthbuild property for which HUD environmental procedures apply, you are to prepare a separate Exhibit 2C(15) in which you supply HUD with environmental threshold information and letters from qualified data sources (see definition below) which support the information. HUD will review your submission and determine how, if necessary, HUD will comply with any federal laws and authorities that may be applicable to your property proposed for Youthbuild funding. If environmental procedures apply and Exhibit 2C(15) with supporting documentation is not included then the application will be deemed ineligible. You are to follow these instructions for preparing Exhibit 2C(15). The instructions advise you on how to obtain and document certain information to be supplied to HUD in this exhibit. Before selecting a property for Youthbuild funding, you should read these instructions and be advised that HUD encourages you to select, to the extent practicable, properties and locations that are free of environmental hazards and problems discussed in these instructions. The responses to the environmental criteria in Exhibit 2C(15) will be used to determine environmental approval or disapproval by HUD of proposals for physical development of properties.

2. After selecting a property for proposed Youthbuild funding, you are to determine the activities to be undertaken with your Youthbuild funds. You are to indicate in Section E whether the Youthbuild funds will be used for:

(a) Lease or purchase of a property;

(b) Minor rehabilitation;

(c) Major rehabilitation; or

(d) New construction of housing.

The activities proposed for Youthbuild funding will determine the kind of data that you will need to obtain from a qualified data source in order to complete Exhibit 2C(15).

3. Once you have selected a property and determined the activities for Youthbuild funding, you are advised to check with your city or county agency that administers HUD's Community Development Block Grant program and performs environmental reviews, or the local planning agency. This course of action is recommended in view of the fact that most, if not all of the data needed for preparing Exhibit 2C(15) is readily available from the local community development agency and the local planning agency. You are advised to ask the environmental staff of those agencies the following questions:

(a) Has the agency ever prepared an environmental review of the proposed Youthbuild property or the neighborhood in which the property is located, and if so, would it provide a copy to the applicant for use by HUD;

(b) Would the agency assist you in completing section G; or if the agency is not able to help complete any item in section G, would the agency advise you which local or state agency is the appropriate qualified data source for obtaining the information.

Also, you should check with the local planning agency before proceeding elsewhere for the information.

You are advised that the cost of preparing information and analyses needed for Exhibit 2C(15) is an eligible cost under the Youthbuild program and is reimbursable if you are approved for a grant.

4. Key terms used in these instructions are defined in the following section. Most of the other terms are technical and their definition would be known to qualified data sources.

(a) Qualified data source means any Federal, State or local agency with expertise or experience in environmental protection (e.g., the local community development agency; the land planning agency; the state environmental protection agency; the State Historic Preservation Officer) or any other source qualified to provide reliable information on the particular subject. Please attach a letter supporting the information from each qualified data source to Exhibit 2C(15).

(b) Minor rehabilitation refers to proposed repairs and renovations to

(1) A building for residential use (with one to four units):

A. Where the density is not increased beyond four units;

B. Where the land use is not changed; and

C. Where the footprint of the building is not increased in a floodplain or in a wetland; or

(2) A multifamily residential building (with more than four units):

A. Where the unit density is not changed more than 20 percent;

B. Where the land use is not changed to non-residential; and

C. Where the estimated cost of rehabilitation is less than 75 percent of the total estimated cost of replacement after rehabilitation.

(c) Major rehabilitation refers to proposed repairs and renovations to an existing building:

(i) Where the estimated cost of the work is 75 percent or more of the property value after completion;

(ii) That involves changes in land use from residential to nonresidential, or from nonresidential to residential;

(iii) That involves the demolition of one or more buildings, or parts of a building, containing the primary use served by the project; or

(iv) That increases unit density by more than 20 percent.

(d) Multifamily housing means any residential building that contains five or more apartments or rooming units.

(e) Single family housing means any residential building that contains one to four dwelling units.

Because each federal environmental law or authority has compliance requirements that differ according to the type of proposed activity to be funded, you are required to supply information in Exhibit 2C(15) only for the type of activity for which the Youthbuild grant will be used.

(f) If you propose new construction or major rehabilitation of multifamily housing, you must supply complete and reliable environmental threshold information for items 1 through 13 in section G.

(g) If you propose new construction of single family housing, you must supply complete and reliable environmental threshold information for items 1 through 12 in section G.

(h) If you propose minor rehabilitation of multifamily or single family housing, or the purchase or lease of a property, you must supply complete and reliable environmental threshold information for items 1 through 7 in section G.

5. Applicants subject to HUD's environmental procedures are to submit Exhibit 2C(15) and accompanying documentation to HUD with the applications for grant assistance. Such applicants are prohibited from committing or expending State, local or other funds in order to undertake property rehabilitation, construction (including demolition), or acquisition (including lease), until HUD and the grantee execute a grant agreement for the proposed Youthbuild project.

6. HUD reserves the right to disqualify any application where one or more environmental thresholds are exceeded if HUD determines that the compliance review cannot be conducted and satisfactorily completed within the HUD review period for Youthbuild applications.

B. Environmental Threshold and Documentation Requirements

The threshold and documentation requirements for each of the Federal environmental laws and authorities are described below, following the same order as they appear in section G.

1. Site within designated coastal barrier resources:

Threshold: Youthbuild applicants are prohibited by Federal law from using Federal financial assistance for properties if the properties are located within designated coastal barriers of the Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico, and the Great Lakes (Coastal Barrier Resources Act, 16 U.S.C. 3501).

*Documentation: You are to select either A or B for the condition that best describes the property and report the option selected in item 1 of section G.

A. Your program operates in a community that does not contain any shores along the Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico, or the Great Lakes.

B. Your program operates in a community that does contain shores along the Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico, or the Great Lakes. You must provide HUD with a finding made by a qualified data source stating that the proposed property is not located within a designated coastal barrier resource by citing the map panel number of the official maps issued by the Department of the Interior (DOI) on the basis of which the finding was made.

2. Site contaminated with toxic chemicals and radioactive materials:

Threshold: Under HUD policy, as described in 24 CFR 50.3 (i), HUD will not approve the provision of financial assistance to residential properties on sites where contamination could affect the health and safety of occupants or conflict with the intended utilization of the property. Sites known or suspected to be contaminated by toxic chemicals or radioactive materials include, but are not limited to, sites: (i) Listed on either an EPA Superfund National Priorities List (NPL) or CERCLA (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act) List, or equivalent state list; (ii) located within 3,000 feet of a hazardous or solid waste landfill site; or (iii) with an underground storage tank (which is not a residential fuel tank).

*Documentation: You are to select either A or B for the condition that best describes property and report the option selected in item 2 of section G.

A. You are providing HUD with a finding made by a qualified data source stating that the proposed Youthbuild property and any neighboring properties do not contain any sites known or suspected to be contaminated with toxic chemicals and radioactive materials.

B. You are providing any site contamination data by a qualified data source in your letter for HUD's evaluation of contamination and/or suspicion of any contamination of a proposed property or any neighboring properties.

3. Site affecting a floodplain:

Threshold: A property located within a floodplain and proposed for funding is subject to Executive Order 11988, Floodplain Management. The Executive Order directs HUD to avoid, where practicable, proposed financial support for any floodplain property, whenever HUD has options to approve properties in flood-free locations. The Order does not apply to existing single family properties proposed for purchase or lease except for: (a) Property that is located within a floodway or coastal high hazard area; and (b) substantial improvement. Substantial improvement for flood hazard purposes means any property rehabilitation which: (i) Increases the unit density of the property; or (ii) equals or exceeds 50 percent of the market value of the property before rehabilitation, but excluding the costs for correcting health, sanitary, and safety code violations. Note: Proposed funding for substantial improvement and new construction are subject to the Executive Order decision making process. This may result in a disqualification of your application (refer above to number 7 under “Instructions to Applicants”).

*Documentation: You are to select A or B for the condition that best describes your property and report the option selected in item 3 of section G.

A. You are providing HUD with a finding made by a qualified data source stating that the property is not located within the Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA).

B. You are providing HUD with a finding made by a qualified data source that the property is located within the Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA) and indicating if the property is located within a floodway or coastal high hazard area.

The information for A and B must provide HUD with the flood map panel number obtained either from the official maps issued for the National Flood Insurance Program or from the property appraisal report used to make the finding.

For all proposed rehabilitation of properties that are located within an SFHA, you must provide HUD with estimates of: (1) The property value before rehabilitation, and (2) the cost of the proposed rehabilitation. Provide the estimates in section F.

If the property is found to be located within a SFHA, proceed to item 4 on flood insurance protection. Otherwise proceed to item 5.

4. Building requiring flood insurance protection:

Threshold: HUD will estimate the amount and period of flood insurance coverage that is to be made a condition of approval of any HUD financial assistance for a building located within a Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA). The Flood Disaster Protection Act of 1973 requires owners of HUD-assisted buildings to purchase and maintain flood insurance protection as a condition of approval of any HUD financial assistance for the proposed purchase, rehabilitation, or new construction of any SFHA building. The law prescribes the coverage period and dollar amount of flood insurance protection.

Proof of Purchase of Flood Insurance Protection: You must provide HUD with proof of purchase of flood insurance protection for any proposed Youthbuild building located within the SFHA, whenever HUD funding is being used for property purchase, rehabilitation, or new construction. The standard documentation for compliance is the Policy Declarations form issued by the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) or issued by any property insurance company offering coverage under the NFIP. Whenever the requirement applies to coverage that extends to future years, the grant agreement will require that the insured have its insurer automatically forward to HUD, in the same manner as to the insured, an information copy of the Policy Declarations form, which is used to verify compliance. The Youthbuild applicant's responsibility ceases in cases where a mortgage loan is approved requiring flood insurance as condition of loan approval by a lender (other than the Youthbuild applicant), whose responsibility is to assure flood insurance coverage for the loan.

*Documentation: You are to select either A or B for the condition that best describes your property and report the option selected in item 4 of section G.

A. You already own the property and attach a copy of the Policy Declarations form confirming that a current flood insurance policy is in effect and the policy provides adequate coverage for the building proposed for the Youthbuild project located within the Special Flood Hazard Area.

B. After you have purchased (or constructed, in the case of proposed new construction) the Youthbuild property, you must obtain and maintain flood insurance protection. For the term and amount of coverage prescribed by law, you must provide HUD with a copy of the Policy Declarations form confirming that the flood insurance policy is in effect and the policy provides adequate coverage for the Youthbuild building located within the Special Flood Hazard Area.

5. Site within clear zones or accident potential zones of airports and airfields:

Threshold: HUD policy as described in 24 CFR part 51, subpart D applies to HUD approval of financial assistance to: (a) Properties located within clear zones; and (b) in the case of new construction or major rehabilitation, properties located within accident potential zones.

(a) Clear zones: New construction and major rehabilitation of a property that is located on a clear zone site is prohibited. HUD financial assistance in a clear zone is allowed only for the proposed lease, purchase, or minor rehabilitation of properties (24 CFR 51.302(a)). For HUD funding approval for any property in a clear zone: (a) HUD will give advance written notice to the prospective property buyer in accord with 24 CFR 51.303(a)(3); and (b) a copy of the HUD notice signed by the prospective property buyer will be placed in the property file. The written notice informs the prospective property buyer of: (i) the potential hazards from airplane accidents, which studies have shown more likely to occur within clear zones than in other areas around the airport/airfield; and (ii) the potential acquisition by airport or airfield operators, who may wish to buy the property at some future date as part of a clear zone acquisition program.

(b) Accident potential zones: For properties located within the accident potential zone (APZ), HUD shall determine whether the use of the property is generally consistent with Department of Defense “Land Use Compatibility Guidelines for Accident Potential Zones.”

*Documentation: You are to select either A or B for the condition that best describes your property and report the option selected in item 5 of section G.

A. The property is not located within 3,000 feet of a civil airport or military airfield.

B. If your property is located within 3,000 feet of a civil airport or military airfield, you must provide HUD with a finding from the airport operator stating whether or not the property is located within a runway clear zone at a civil airport, or a clear zone or accident potential zone at a military airfield.

For properties that are located within a runway clear zone or a clear zone or accident potential zone, if you propose to rehabilitate such a property you must provide HUD with estimates of: (i) the cost of the proposed rehabilitation, and (ii) the property value after completion of the rehabilitation. The estimates are to be provided in section F.

6. Site is or affects an historic property:

Threshold: Only if a property is proposed for rehabilitation or new construction must HUD in consultation with the State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO), and following the Department of the Interior's Standards and Guidelines for Evaluation, make a determination whether the property is:

(a) Listed on or formally determined to be eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places;

(b) Located within or directly adjacent to an historic district; or

(c) A property whose area of potential effects includes an historic district or property. Historic properties and districts are subject by law to special protection and historic preservation processing, which HUD must perform to comply with the regulations of the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP: 36 CFR part 800). Note: If you are using information from the SHPO as a qualified data source you need to allow sufficient time to obtain the information from the SHPO. You may wish to make special arrangements with the SHPO for rapid review of the proposed property where this is practicable. In addition, for properties determined to be historic properties, HUD will require 30 to 90 days in most cases for HUD to perform historic preservation compliance with the ACHP regulations. This may result in a disqualification of the application (refer above to number 7 under “Instructions to Applicants”).

* Documentation: You are to select one of the following options that best describes the condition of your property and report the option selected in item 6 of section G.

A. You propose financial assistance for rehabilitation or new construction, and are providing HUD with a SHPO's finding that the proposed Youthbuild activity:

1. Is located within an area where there are no historic properties; or

2. Will have no effect on historic properties; or

3. Will have an effect on historic properties not considered adverse.

B. You propose financial assistance for rehabilitation or new construction, and are providing HUD with a SHPO's finding that the proposed Youthbuild activity will have an adverse effect on historic properties.

C. You are providing HUD with a copy of a letter from the SHPO stating any reasons for not being able to provide you with the requested information and finding.

7. Site near hazardous industrial operations:

Threshold: Properties that are located near hazardous industrial operations handling fuels or chemicals of an explosive or flammable nature are subject to HUD safety standards (24 CFR 51, Subpart C). However, under the Youthbuild program, these standards would apply only if you propose: (a) Construction of a building; (b) conversion of a non-residential land use to a residential land use including making habitable a building condemned for habitation; or (c) rehabilitation that increases the density of a residential structure by increasing the number of dwelling or rooming units. In the case of tanks containing common liquid fuels, the requirement for an acceptable separation distance (ASD) calculation only applies to storage tanks that have a capacity of more than 100 gallons. * Documentation: You are to select one of the following options that best describes the condition of the property, and report the option selected in item 7 of section G.

A. The proposed project does not include: (1) Construction of a building; (2) conversion of a non-residential land use to a residential land use including making habitable a building condemned for habitation; or (3) rehabilitation that increases the density of a residential structure by increasing the number of dwelling or rooming units.

B. The proposed project includes: (1) Construction of a building; (2) conversion of a non-residential land use to a residential land use including making habitable a building condemned for habitation; or (3) rehabilitation that increases the density of a residential structure by increasing the number of dwelling or rooming units; and you are providing HUD with a finding by a qualified data source that the proposed property is not located within the immediate vicinity of hazardous industrial operations handling fuel or chemicals of an explosive or flammable nature by citing data used and the maps used.

C. The applicant proposes: (1) Construction of a building; (2) conversion of a non-residential land use to a residential land use including making habitable a building condemned for habitation; or (3) rehabilitation that increases the density of a residential structure by increasing the number of dwelling or rooming units. The grantee provides HUD a finding made by a qualified data source stating: (1) That the proposed property is located within the immediate vicinity of hazardous industrial operations handling fuel or chemicals of an explosive or flammable nature; (2) the type and scale of such hazardous industrial operations; (3) the distance of such operations from the proposed property; (4) a preliminary calculation of the acceptable separation distance (ASD) between such operations and the proposed property; and (5) a recommendation as to whether it is safe to use the property in accord with 24 CFR part 51, subpart C.

8. Site near high noise source:

Threshold: For new construction that is to occur in high noise areas (i.e., exceeding 65 decibels), applicants shall incorporate noise attenuation features to the extent required by HUD environmental criteria and standards contained in subpart B (Noise Abatement and Control) of 24 CFR part 51. Approvals in a Normally unacceptable noise zone require a minimum of 5 decibels additional sound attenuation for buildings having noise-sensitive uses if the day-night average sound level is greater than 65 decibels but does not exceed 70 decibels, or a minimum of 10 decibels of additional sound attenuation if the day-night average sound level is greater than 70 decibels but does not exceed 75 decibels.

Proposed housing sites with above 75 decibels are unacceptable and the noise attenuation measures require the approval of the Assistant Secretary for Community Planning and Development. In Unacceptable noise zones, HUD strongly encourages conversion of noise-exposed sites to non-housing land uses compatible with the high noise levels.

For major rehabilitation projects involving five or more dwelling units located in the “Normally Unacceptable” and “Unacceptable” noise zones, HUD actively seeks to have project sponsors incorporate noise attenuation features, given the extent and nature of the rehabilitation being undertaken and the level of exterior noise exposure.

* Documentation: You are to select A or B for the condition that best describes their project and report the option selected in item 8 of section G.

A. You are providing HUD with a finding made by a qualified data source stating that the property proposed by the applicant for a major rehabilitation or new construction project involving five or more dwelling units is not located within: (1) 1,000 feet of a major noise source, road, or highway; (2) 3,000 feet of a railroad; or (3) 1 mile of a civil or 5 miles of a military airfield.

B. The applicant provides HUD with a finding made by a qualified data source: (1) Stating that the plans for the property proposed by the applicant for a major rehabilitation or new construction project involving five or more dwelling units will incorporate noise attenuation features in accord with HUD environmental criteria and standards contained in subpart B (Noise Abatement and Control) of 24 CFR part 51; (2) stating whether the property is located within a “Normally Unacceptable” or “Unacceptable” noise zone; and (3) providing HUD plans and a statement of the anticipated interior noise levels.

9. Site affecting coastal zone management:

Threshold: Only for proposed activities involving new construction or major rehabilitation of multifamily housing does the Coastal Zone Management (CZM) authority apply. Projects that can affect the coastal zone must be carried out in a manner consistent with the approved state coastal zone management program under section 307 of the Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972, as amended.

* Documentation: You are to select either A or B for the condition that best describes the project and report the option selected in item 9 of section G.

A. You state that your project is not located within a coastal zone, as defined by the States Coastal Zone Management Plan.

B. If your project is located within a coastal zone, you are providing HUD with a finding made by the state coastal zone management agency that the project proposed by the applicant is consistent with the approved state coastal zone management program.

10. Site affecting a sole source aquifer:

Threshold: The sole source aquifer authority applies primarily to activities involving proposed new construction or conversion to housing of non-residential property. Projects that can affect aquifers designated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must be reviewed for impact on such designated aquifer sources. The Safe Drinking Water Act of 1974 requires protection of drinking water systems that are the sole or principal drinking water source for an area and which, if contaminated, would create a significant hazard to public health.

* Documentation: You are to select either A or B for the condition that best describes the project and report the option selected in item 10 of section G.

A. You are providing HUD with a finding made by a qualified data source stating that the proposed property is not located on nor does it affect a sole source aquifer designated by EPA.

B. If your project proposes new construction or conversion activities that are located on or may affect any sole source aquifer designated by the EPA, you are identifying the aquifer and providing HUD with an explanation of the effect on the aquifer from a qualified data source, and/or a copy of any comments on the proposed project that have been received from the EPA Regional Office as well as from any state or local agency with jurisdiction for protecting the drinking water system.

11. Site affecting endangered species:

Threshold: The Endangered Species Protection (ESP) authority applies primarily to activities involving proposed new construction or conversion to housing of a non-residential property. Projects which can affect listed or proposed endangered or threatened species or critical habitats require consultation with the Department of the Interior or the Department of Commerce in compliance with the procedure of section 7 of the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended.

* Documentation: You are to select either A or B for the condition that best describes the property and report the option selected in item 11 of section G.

A. If your project proposes new construction or conversion activities, you are providing HUD with a finding made by a qualified data source that the project is not likely to affect any listed or proposed endangered or threatened species or critical habitat. The finding shall indicate whether the project is located within a critical habitat, and if so, explain why the project is not likely to affect the species or habitat.

B. If your project proposes new construction or conversion activities that are likely to affect listed or proposed endangered or threatened species or critical habitat, you are providing HUD with a statement from a qualified data source explaining the likely effect, and/or a finding made by the Fish and Wildlife Service of the Department of the Interior or the National Marine Fisheries Service of the Department of Commerce stating as acceptable the proposed mitigation that you will provide to protect any affected endangered or threatened species or critical habitat.

12. Site affecting a designated wetland:

Threshold: New construction or conversion to housing of a non-residential property located within a designated wetland is subject to Executive Order 11990, Protection of Wetlands. This Executive Order directs HUD to avoid, where practicable, financial support for new construction on wetland property. Note: Proposed funding for new construction or conversion is subject to the Executive Order decision making process. This may result in a disqualification of the application (refer above to number 7 under “Instructions to Applicants”).

* Documentation: You are to select A or B for the condition that best describes the property and report the option selected in item 12 of section G.

A. You are providing HUD with a finding made by a qualified data source stating that the property is not located within a designated wetland where new construction or conversion is proposed.

B. You are providing HUD with a finding made by a qualified data source that the property is located within a designated wetland, which applies only to property where new construction or conversion is proposed.

The information for A and B must provide HUD with the wetland panel number obtained from official maps issued by the Department of the Interior on the basis of which the finding was made, or where the Department of the Interior has not mapped the area, a letter or other documentation from the Army Corps of Engineers or other federal agency.

13. Significant impact to the human environment:

Threshold: HUD must perform an environmental assessment of any property proposed for either:

(1) Major rehabilitation of:

1. Multifamily residential buildings (with more than four units) that would: increase unit density by more than 20 percent, change the land use, or cost 75 percent or more of the total estimated cost of replacement after rehabilitation; or

2. Buildings for residential use (with one to four units) that would increase density beyond four units, change the land use, or increase the footprint of the building in a floodplain or in a wetland;

(2) New construction except for (A) and individual action on up to four dwelling units where there is a maximum of four units on any one site (the units can be four one-unit buildings or one four-unit building or any combination in between); and (B) an individual action on a project of five or more housing units developed on scattered sites, when the sites are more than 2,000 feet apart and there are not more than four housing units on any one site. It is the policy of the Department to reject proposals that have significant adverse environmental impacts and to encourage the modification of projects in order to enhance environmental quality and minimize environmental harm. This policy is authorized by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the implementing regulations of the Council on Environmental Quality and HUD's Environmental regulations at 24 CFR part 50.

* Documentation: You are to provide HUD with any information on any adverse environmental impacts that affect the property or that the project would create. You are to report these data on a separate sheet and attach it to Exhibit 2C(15). Examples of adverse impacts are: soil instability and erodibility; natural or person-made hazards and nuisances; air pollution; inadequate infrastructure (e.g., water supply, waste water treatment, storm water management, solid waste collection), inadequate public services (i.e., fire, police, health care, social services, schools, parks) and transportation; and encroachment on prime farmlands and wild and scenic river areas. You are to identify any significant impacts to the human environment.

Appendix B Back to Top

The non-standard forms which follow are required for your Youthbuild application. The Youthbuild forms were approved under OMB Approval No. 2506-0142 (expiration 12/31/06).

BILLING CODE 4210-32-P

HOUSING CHOICE VOUCHER FAMILY SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM COORDINATORS Back to Top

Overview Information Back to Top

A. Federal Agency Name: Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Public and Indian Housing, Office of Public Housing and Voucher Programs.

B. Funding Opportunity Title: Housing Choice Voucher Family Self-Sufficiency (FSS) Program Coordinators.

C. Announcement Type: Initial announcement.

D. Funding Opportunity Number: The Federal Register number for this NOFA is FR-4900-N-30. The OMB approval number for this program is 2577-0178.

E. Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number: 14.871, Section 8 Housing Choice Vouchers.

F. Dates: Application Deadline: The application due date is June 22, 2004. Please see the General Section of the SuperNOFA for application submission, delivery, and timely receipt requirements.

G. Optional, Additional Overview Content Information: The purpose of the Housing Choice Voucher FSS program is to promote the development of local strategies to coordinate the use of assistance under the Housing Choice Voucher program with public and private resources to enable participating families to achieve economic independence and self-sufficiency. The FSS program and this FSS NOFA support the Department's strategic goals of increasing homeownership activities and helping HUD-assisted renters make progress toward self-sufficiency. The FSS program provides critical tools that can be used by communities to support welfare reform and help families develop new skills that will lead to economic self-sufficiency. As a result of their participation in the FSS program, many families have achieved stable, well-paid employment, which has made it possible for them to become homeowners. An FSS program coordinator assures that program participants are linked to the supportive services they need to achieve self-sufficiency.

FULL TEXT OF ANNOUNCEMENT Back to Top

I. Funding Opportunity Description Back to Top

A. Authority and Program Description

Title II of Division G of the Consolidated Appropriations Act 2004, (Pub. L. 108-199, approved January 23, 2004) allows funding for program coordinators under the Housing Choice Voucher FSS program. Through annual NOFAs, HUD has provided funding to public housing agencies (PHAs) that are operating Housing Choice Voucher FSS programs to enable those PHAs to employ program coordinators to support their Housing Choice Voucher FSS programs. In the Fiscal Year (FY) 2004 Housing Choice Voucher FSS Program Coordinator NOFA, HUD is again making funding available to PHAs to employ FSS program coordinators and FSS homeownership program coordinators for one year. Funding priority under this NOFA will be provided to applicants that demonstrate that their FSS families have participated in homeownership programs. HUD will accept applications from both new and renewal PHAs that have HUD approval to administer a Housing Choice Voucher FSS program. PHAs funded under an FSS NOFA in FY2002, or FY2003 are considered “renewal” PHAs in this NOFA. These renewal PHAs are invited to apply for funds to continue previously funded FSS program coordinator and FSS homeownership coordinator positions that they have filled. In addition, any renewal PHA that did not receive funding for a Housing Choice Voucher FSS homeownership coordinator under a previous FSS NOFA is invited to apply for funding for a coordinator position to support FSS homeownership activities. The maximum number of positions a renewal PHA may receive would be equal to the highest number of filled positions funded under the FY 2002 or FY2003 FSS NOFA, plus funding for an FSS homeownership coordinator if the PHA did not receive funding for a homeownership coordinator under a previous FSS NOFA.

Because of the importance of the FSS program in helping families increase earned income and develop assets, HUD will also accept applications from “new” PHAs; PHAs that do not qualify as renewal PHAs under this FSS NOFA. The maximum number of positions that a new applicant PHA, including new PHA joint applicants, may receive is one full-time FSS program coordinator. Preference in funding these “new” applicant PHAs will be given to applicants with qualifying existing homeownership programs serving FSS program participants and graduates. A definition of qualifying homeownership programs is listed below.

To support the Department's initiatives on Colonias, a selection preference is again included in this NOFA for “new” applicant PHAs that provide services and support to rural under-served communities in the Southwest Border regions of Arizona, California, New Mexico, and Texas. See section III.D.3.b. of this NOFA for requirements that must be met to qualify for the Colonias preference.

PHAs are encouraged to outreach to disabled Housing Choice Voucher program participants who might be interested in participating in the FSS program and to include agencies on their FSS Program Coordinating Committee (PCC) that work with and provide services for disabled families.

Applicants must administer the FSS program in accordance with HUD regulations and requirements in 24 CFR Part 984 which govern the Housing Choice Voucher FSS Program and must comply with the existing Section 8 Housing Choice Voucher program requirements, Notices and guidebooks.

B. Number of Positions for Which Eligible PHAs May Apply

Eligible PHAs may apply for funding for Housing Choice Voucher FSS program coordinator positions under this NOFA as follows:

1. Renewal PHAs. PHAs that qualify as eligible renewal PHAs under this NOFA, may apply for: (a) Continuation of each FSS coordinator position, including homeownership coordinator positions, most recently funded under an FSS NOFA in FY2002 or FY2003 that has been filled by the PHA. (b) New Position. Up to one initial full-time FSS homeownership program coordinator for renewal PHAs with qualifying homeownership programs that did not receive funding for an FSS homeownership coordinator under an earlier FSS NOFA.

2. New PHAs. A PHA that meets the requirements for a new PHA under this FSS NOFA, may apply for Housing Choice Voucher FSS program coordinator positions as follows: (a) Up to one full-time FSS coordinator position for a PHA with HUD approval to administer an FSS program of 25 or more FSS slots. (b) Up to one full-time position per application for joint PHA applicants that together have HUD approval to administer a total of at least 25 Housing Choice Voucher FSS slots.

C. Definitions

The following definitions apply to the funding available under this NOFA.

1. Renewal PHA Applicant. A PHA or PHAs that received funding under an FSS NOFA in FY2002 or FY2003.

2. New PHA Applicant. PHAs that did not receive funding under an FSS NOFA in FY 2002 or FY2003 that have HUD approval to administer a Housing Choice Voucher FSS program of at least 25 slots or that fulfill the 25 slot minimum by applying jointly with one or more other PHAs.

3. FSS Program Size. The total number of Housing Choice Voucher FSS program slots identified in the PHA's HUD-approved FSS Action Plan. The total may include both voluntary and mandatory Housing Choice Voucher FSS program slots.

4. Qualifying Homeownership Program. Qualifying programs include the Housing Choice Voucher program homeownership option or other programs that prepare Housing Choice Voucher program FSS participants for making the transition from renting to homeownership.

5. FSS Homeownership Percentage. A percentage that will be computed by HUD for the purpose of establishing the order of funding of eligible applicants under this NOFA. It is the total number of an applicant's Housing Choice Voucher FSS homeownership families as a percentage of the PHA's Housing Choice Voucher FSS program participants.

6. Total Number of FSS Homeownership Families. The total number of Housing Choice Voucher FSS homeownership families enrolled in the applicant's Qualifying Homeownership Program as of September 30, 2003, plus the number of its Housing Choice Voucher FSS graduates that moved to homeownership between October 1, 2000, and September 30, 2003. Homeownership participation of families is reported to HUD on the FSS program coordinator application and these numbers are subject to post audit.

7. The Number of Housing Choice Voucher FSS Program Participants. A number that is used to calculate the FSS Homeownership Percentage of the applicant. It is the total number of families shown in HUD's PIC data system as enrolled in the applicant's Housing Choice Voucher FSS program on September 30, 2003, plus the number of families that successfully completed their Housing Choice Voucher FSS contracts in the applicant's program between October 1, 2002, and September 30, 2003.

8. Percentage of Families with Positive FSS Escrow Balances. A percentage that will be computed by HUD and used to determine funding order under this NOFA. It is the number of Housing Choice Voucher FSS families with positive escrow balances as a percentage of Housing Choice Voucher FSS families with FSS progress reports submitted to HUD on the Form HUD-50058 FSS addendum. The data source is HUD's PIC data system records of Form HUD-50058 Housing Choice Voucher FSS program progress reports that were effective between October 1, 2002, and September 30, 2003.

9. Housing Choice Voucher Program Size. The number of Housing Choice Vouchers in a PHA's voucher program as determined by HUD using baseline data.

10. Local HUD Field Office. In this announcement, this means the local HUD field office Hub, not the local HUD field office Program Center. A listing of HUD field offices is included as an appendix to the General Section of the SuperNOFA.

II. Award Information Back to Top

A. Available Funds

This NOFA announces the availability of up to $47.7 million in FY2004 to employ FSS program and FSS homeownership coordinators for the Housing Choice Voucher FSS program. If additional funding becomes available during FY2004, HUD may increase the amount available for Housing Choice Voucher FSS Program coordinators and FSS homeownership coordinators under this NOFA. A maximum of $63,000 is available for each full-time coordinator position funded. Salaries are to be based on local comparables.

III. Eligibility Information Back to Top

A. Eligible Applicants

PHAs eligible to apply for funding under this NOFA are:

1. Renewal PHAs. Those PHAs that received funding under an FSS NOFA in FY2002 or FY2003. To continue to qualify as renewal PHAs, the FY2004 application of joint applicants must include at least one PHA applicant that meets this standard. Joint applicants can change the lead PHA in their FY2004 application. A PHA that was originally funded as part of a joint application, that wishes to now apply separately would continue to be considered a renewal PHA applicant for funding purposes, but must be able to meet the FSS minimum program size requirement of a HUD-approved Housing Choice Voucher program of at least 25 slots that applies to new applicant PHAs.

2. New PHAs. PHAs that were not funded under an FSS NOFA in FY2002 or FY2003. The new applicant PHA must be authorized through its HUD-approved FSS Action Plan to administer a Housing Choice Voucher FSS program of at least 25 slots, or be a PHA with HUD approval to administer Housing Choice Voucher FSS programs of fewer than 25 slots that applies jointly with one or more other PHAs so that together they have HUD approval to administer at least 25 Housing Choice Voucher FSS slots. Joint applicants must specify a lead co-applicant that will receive and administer the FSS program coordinator funding.

3. Moving to Work (MTW) PHAs. New and renewal PHAs that are under the MTW demonstration may qualify for funding under this NOFA if the PHA administers an FSS program. When determining the size of a MTW PHA's HUD-approved FSS program, the PHA may request that the number of FSS slots reflected in the PHA's MTW agreement be used instead of the number in the PHA's FSS Action Plan.

4. Troubled PHAs.

a. A PHA that has been designated by HUD as a troubled PHA under the Section 8 Management Assessment Program (SEMAP), or that has serious program management findings from Inspector General audits or serious outstanding HUD management review or Independent Public Accountant (IPA) audit findings for the PHA's Housing Choice Voucher or Moderate Rehabilitation programs that are resolved prior to application due date is eligible to apply under this NOFA. Serious program management findings are those that would cast doubt on the capacity of the PHA to administer its Housing Choice Voucher FSS program in accordance with applicable HUD regulatory and statutory requirements.

b. The requirements that apply to a PHA whose SEMAP troubled designation has not been removed by HUD or the major program management findings or other significant program compliance problems resolved by the due date are stated in Section III.C.3.e. of this NOFA.

B. Cost Sharing or Matching

None required.

C. Other

1. Eligible Activities

Funds awarded to PHAs under this FSS NOFA may only be used to pay salaries and fringe benefits of Housing Choice Voucher FSS program staff. Funding may be used to employ or otherwise retain for one year the services of Housing Choice Voucher FSS program coordinators and FSS homeownership coordinators. FSS Coordinator support positions funded under previous FSS NOFAs that made funding available for such FSS positions may be continued. A part-time program coordinator may be retained where appropriate.

2. Threshold Requirements

a. All Applicants.

(1) Each applicant must qualify as an eligible PHA under Section III.A. of this NOFA and must have submitted their FSS application by the application due date and in the format required in Section IV. of this NOFA.

(2) All applications must include a Dun and Bradstreet Universal Numbering System (DUNS) number. (See Section III.C.2.b. of the General Section of this SuperNOFA for further information about the DUNS number requirement.)

(3) Civil Rights Threshold, Non-discrimination, Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing, and Economic Opportunities for Low- and Very Low-Income Persons (Section 3) requirements. For detail on these requirements, please see the General Section of the SuperNOFA, Section III.C.2.c. and C.4.a, b. and c.

(4) The PHA must have a financial management system that meets federal standards. See Section III.C.2.f. of the General Section of the SuperNOFA regarding those applicants that may be subject to HUD's arranging for a pre-award survey of an applicant's financial management system.

(5) Applicants must comply with the requirements for funding competitions established by the HUD Reform Act of 1989 (42 U.S.C. 3531 et seq.) and other requirements as defined in the General Section of the SuperNOFA.

b. Renewal Applicants.

(1) Continued funding for existing coordinator positions. In addition to meeting the requirements of Section III.A.of this FSS NOFA, renewal PHA applicants must continue to operate a Housing Choice Voucher FSS program, have filled eligible FSS program coordinator positions for which they are seeking renewal funding, executed FSS contracts of participation with Housing Choice Voucher FSS program families and submitted reports on participant families to HUD via the form HUD-50058 FSS/WtW Voucher Addendum.

(2) New position. Renewal PHAs applying for a Housing Choice Voucher FSS Homeownership Coordinator must meet all requirements in Section III.A. and III.C.2.a and b. above, must not have received funding for an FSS homeownership coordinator under an earlier Housing Choice Voucher FSS Program Coordinator NOFA and must administer or participate in a qualifying homeownership program that serves Housing Choice Voucher FSS program participants or graduates. Qualifying homeownership programs include the Housing Choice Voucher program homeownership option and other programs that prepare Housing Choice Voucher program FSS participants for making the transition from rental to homeownership.

c. New Applicants. New applicants must meet the requirements of Section III.A. and Section III C.2.a of this FSS NOFA.

3. Program Requirements

a. Salary Comparables. For all positions requested under this NOFA, evidence of salary comparability to similar positions in the local jurisdiction must be kept on file in the PHA office

b. FSS Action Plan. The requirements for the FSS Action Plan are stated in 24 CFR 984.201. For a new PHA applicant to qualify for funding under this NOFA, the PHA's initial FSS Action Plan or amendment to change the number of Housing Choice Voucher FSS slots in the PHA's previously HUD-approved FSS Action Plan must be submitted to and approved by the PHA's local HUD field office prior to the application due date of this FSS NOFA. An FSS Action Plan can be updated by means of a simple one-page addendum that reflects the total number of FSS slots (voluntary and /or mandatory slots) the PHA intends to fill. New PHA applicants with previously approved Housing Choice Voucher FSS Action Plans may wish to confirm the number of HUD-approved slots their local HUD field office has on record for the PHA. A MTW PHA may request that the number of FSS slots reflected in its MTW agreement be used instead of the number of slots in the PHA's FSS Action Plan.

c. Colonias Preference. New applicant PHAs claiming the Colonias preference must meet the requirements of Section III.A. and Section III.C.2.a and III.C.2.c. of this FSS NOFA and must operate in a Southwest border area that contains Colonia communities and administer programs that include outreach to members of those Colonia communities. Attachment A of this NOFA provides a listing of PHAs in Arizona, California, New Mexico, and Texas that HUD has identified as operating in areas containing Colonia communities. PHAs not listed in Attachment A that are claiming the Colonias preference will be required to include in their application submission a written request that HUD determine their eligibility for the preference.

d. Homeownership Preference. To qualify for preference, a PHA must administer or participate in a Qualifying Homeownership Program. See definition at Section I.C.4.

e. Troubled PHAs. A PHA whose SEMAP troubled designation has not been removed by HUD or the major program management findings or other significant program compliance problems resolved by the application due date, may apply if the PHA submits an application that designates another organization or entity that is acceptable to HUD that:

(1) Includes an agreement by the other organization or entity to administer the FSS program on behalf of the PHA; and

(2) In the instance of a PHA with unresolved major program management findings, includes a statement that outlines the steps the PHA is taking to resolve the program findings.

Immediately after the publication of this NOFA, the Office of Public Housing in the local HUD field office will notify, in writing, those PHAs that have been designated by HUD as troubled under SEMAP, and those PHAs with unresolved major program management findings or other significant program compliance problems that are not eligible to apply without such an agreement. Concurrently, the local HUD field office will provide a copy of each such written notification to the Director of the Grants Management Center.

f. Conducting Business in Accordance with Core Values and Ethical Standards. To reflect core values, all PHAs shall develop and maintain a written code of conduct in the PHA administrative plan that:

(1) Requires compliance with the conflict of interest requirements of the Housing Choice Voucher Program at 24 CFR 982.161; and

(2) Prohibits the solicitation or acceptance of gifts or gratuities, in excess of a nominal value, by any officer or employee of the PHA, or any contractor, subcontractor, or agent of the PHA. The PHA's administrative plan shall state PHA policies concerning PHA administrative and disciplinary remedies for violation of the PHA code of conduct. The PHA shall inform all officers, employees, and agents of its organization of the PHA's code of conduct.

IV. Application and Submission Information Back to Top

A. Addresses to Request Application Package

1. Web site. A copy of this funding announcement for the Housing Choice Voucher FSS Program may be downloaded from the following HUD Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/adm/grants/fundsavail.cfm.

2. Application Kit. There is no application kit for this NOFA. This announcement contains all the information necessary for the submission of your application for Housing Choice Voucher FSS program coordinator funding.

3. Further Information. You may request general information, copies of the General Section and of a Program NOFA or NOFAs, from the NOFA Information Center (800-HUD-8929) or 800-HUD-2209 (TTY) between the hours of 9 a.m. and 8 p.m. (eastern time) Monday through Friday, except on Federal holidays. When requesting information, please refer to the name of the program you are interested in. Be sure to provide your name, address (including ZIP code), and telephone number (including area code). To ensure sufficient time to prepare your application, requests for copies of this NOFA can be made immediately following publication of the SuperNOFA. The NOFA Information Center opens for business simultaneously with the publication of the SuperNOFA. You can also obtain information on this SuperNOFA and download application information for this NOFA through the HUD Web site, www.hud.gov.

4. Technical Assistance. See Section VII. of this FSS funding announcement.

B. Content and Form of Application Submission

1. Content of Application. Each new and renewal PHA must complete the form SF-424, HUD-424B, the SF-LLL, if appropriate, and the Form HUD-52651, the new FSS application form. A copy of the HUD-52651 follows immediately after Attachment A of this NOFA. In completing the SF-424, renewal PHAs should select the continuation box on question 8, type of application. Both new and renewal PHA applicants should enter the proposed ACC amendment effective and ending dates for the FSS coordinator funding in 13 of the HUD-424. In section 15 of SF-424, estimated funding, complete only 15.a., which will be the amount requested from HUD in the FY2004 FSS application.

2. Forms, Certifications, and Assurances. Each applicant is required to submit signed copies of Assurances and Certifications. The Assurances and Certifications required for this FSS NOFA are on the Form HUD-424B, the new FSS application Form HUD-52651, and, if applicable, the SF-LLL, Disclosure of Lobbying Activities.

C. Submission Date and Time

Your completed application (an original and two copies) is due on or before June 22, 2004. See the paragraph titled “Addresses and Application Submission Procedures” in the General Section of the SuperNOFA regarding HUD's mailing, delivery and receipt procedures pertinent to the submission of your application.

D. Intergovernmental Review

Applicants submitting applications under this funding announcement are not subject to intergovernmental review; i.e., Executive Order (EO) 12372, Intergovernmental Review of Federal Program.

E. Funding Restrictions

1. Salary Cap. Awards under this NOFA are subject to a cap of $63,000 per year per full time coordinator position funded. Under this NOFA, if PHAs apply jointly, the $63,000 maximum amount that may be requested per position applies to up to one full time coordinator position for the application as a whole, not to each PHA separately.

2. Limitation on Renewal Funding Increases. For renewal coordinator positions, PHAs will be limited to a one percent increase above the amount of the most recent award for the position unless a higher increase is approved by the local HUD field office after review of the PHA's written justification and at least three comparables that must be submitted to the field office by the PHA with a copy of its FY2004 Housing Choice Voucher FSS Program Coordinator application. Examples of acceptable reasons for increases above one percent would be need for a coordinator with higher level of skills or to increase the hours of a part time coordinator to full time. Total positions funded cannot exceed the maximum number of positions for which the PHA is eligible under this NOFA.

3. Ineligible Activities.

a. Funds under this NOFA may not be used to pay the salary of an FSS coordinator for a public housing FSS program. In FY2004, funding for public housing FSS program coordinators is being made available through the Public Housing Resident Opportunities and Self-Sufficiency (ROSS) NOFA for Public Housing FSS Program Coordinators that is included in the FY2004 SuperNOFA.

b. Funds under this FSS NOFA may not be used to pay for services for FSS program participants.

F. Other Submission Requirements

1. Submission to the GMC. Submit your original application and one copy with an Acknowledgement of Receipt Form to: HUD Grants Management Center, 2001 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 703, Arlington, VA 22202, Attention: Housing Choice Voucher Family Self-Sufficiency Program Coordinators. The Grants Management Center is the official place of receipt for all applications in response to this announcement of funding availability. Applications not submitted to the Grants Management Center will not be considered.

2. Submission to Field Office. A copy of the application shall also be submitted to your local HUD field office by the application due date. Failure of the field office to receive the application by the due date will not automatically disqualify the application from further consideration. For ease of reference, the term “local HUD field office” as used in this announcement means the local HUD field office Hub, not the local HUD field office Program Center. A listing of HUD field office Hubs is in the General Section of the SuperNOFA.

V. Application Review Information Back to Top

A. Criteria

The funds available under this NOFA are not being awarded on a competitive basis. Applications are reviewed by the local HUD field office and GMC to determine whether or not they are technically adequate based on the NOFA requirements. Field offices will provide to the GMC in a timely manner, as requested, information needed by the GMC to make its determination, such as the HUD-approved Housing Choice Voucher FSS program size of new PHA applicants and information on the administrative capabilities of PHAs. Categories of applications that will not be funded are stated in Section V.B.6. of this FSS NOFA.

B. Reviews and Selection Process

1. Technically Acceptable Applications. All technically adequate applications will be funded to the extent funds are available.

2. Funding Priority Categories. If HUD receives applications for funding greater than the amount made available under this NOFA, HUD will divide eligible applications into priority categories as follows:

Funding Category 1—Applications from eligible renewal PHAs with qualifying homeownership programs for continuation of eligible positions where the PHA has hired a coordinator.

Funding Category 2—Eligible new applicant PHAs with qualifying homeownership programs.

Funding Category 3—Applications from eligible renewal PHAs for an initial coordinator position to support FSS homeownership activities.

Funding Category 4—Applications from renewal PHAs without qualifying homeownership programs.

Funding Category 5—Applications from new applicant PHAs without qualifying homeownership programs.

3. Order of Funding. Starting with Funding Category 1, HUD will first determine whether there are sufficient monies to fund all eligible positions requested in the funding category. If available funding is not sufficient to fund all positions requested in the category, HUD will fund applications in the following order:

(a) Funding Category 1. HUD will calculate for each eligible applicant, the PHA's FSS Homeownership Percentage and Positive Escrow Percentage and will use these percentages in making funding decisions. Definitions and a description of the calculation of the FSS Homeownership Percentage and the Positive Escrow Percentage are included in Section I.C. of this NOFA.

HUD will begin funding eligible renewal applicants with Qualifying Homeownership Programs starting with the PHAs with the highest FSS Homeownership Percentage first. If monies are not sufficient to fund all applicants with the same FSS Homeownership Percentage, HUD will fund eligible applicants in order starting with those that have the highest Positive Escrow Percentage first. If funding is not sufficient to fund all applicants with the same FSS Homeownership Percentage and/or Positive Escrow Percentage, HUD will select among eligible applicants by Housing Choice Voucher program size starting with eligible applicants with the smallest Housing Choice Voucher program size first.

(b) Funding Category 2. If funding remains after funding all Funding Category 1 applications, HUD will then process eligible Funding Category 2 applications. HUD will calculate the FSS Homeownership Percentage and Positive Escrow Percentage for Funding Category 2 applicants as it did for Funding Category 1 applicants. If there are not sufficient monies to fund all Funding Category 2 applications, HUD will first fund applications from Category 2 PHAs eligible for the Colonias preference, starting with PHAs with the smallest Housing Choice Voucher program size first. If monies are still available, HUD will begin funding Funding Category 2 applications from PHAs with Qualifying Homeownership programs starting with applicants with the highest FSS Homeownership Percentage first. If there is not enough funding for all applicants with the same FSS Homeownership Percentage, HUD will use Positive Escrow Percentage to determine selection order, starting with applicants with the highest Positive Escrow Percentage. If monies are not sufficient to fund all applicants with the same FSS Homeownership Percentage and Positive Escrow Percentage, HUD will select eligible applicants by Housing Choice Voucher program size starting with eligible applicants with the smallest Housing Choice Voucher program size first.

(c) Funding Category 3. If funding remains after funding all Funding Category 1 and 2 applications, HUD will then process requests of eligible renewal PHAs for an initial coordinator position to support FSS homeownership activities. If there are not sufficient monies to fund all eligible positions requested, HUD will begin funding positions starting with PHAs with the highest FSS Homeownership Percentage first. If there are not sufficient monies to fund all applications with the same FSS Homeownership Percentage, HUD will fund those eligible applicants with the highest Positive Escrow Percentage first. If monies are not sufficient to fund all eligible applicants with the same FSS Homeownership Percentage and Positive Escrow Percentage, HUD will select eligible applicants in order by Housing Choice Voucher program size starting with eligible applicants with the smallest Housing Choice Voucher program size first.

(d) Funding Category 4. If funding remains, HUD will calculate the Positive Escrow Percentage of PHAs in Category 4 and will begin funding eligible applications starting with applicants with the highest Positive Escrow Percentage first. If monies are not sufficient to fund all applicants with the same Positive Escrow Percentage, HUD will select eligible applicants by Housing Choice Voucher program size starting with eligible applicants with the smallest Housing Choice Voucher program size first.

(e) Funding Category 5. If funding remains after funding all Category 1 through 4 applicants, HUD will then process applications from eligible Category 5 applicants for an initial coordinator position. If there are not sufficient monies to fund all eligible Category 5 applicants, HUD will first fund applications from eligible Category 5 applicants qualifying for the Colonias preference. If monies are still available, HUD will calculate the Positive Escrow Percentage for the remaining Category 5 applications and will begin funding Category 5 applications starting with applicants with the highest Positive Escrow Percentage first. If monies are not sufficient to fund all applicants with the same Positive Escrow Percentage, HUD will select eligible applicants by Housing Choice Voucher program size starting with eligible applicants with the smallest Housing Choice Voucher program size first.

4. Based on the number of applications submitted, the GMC may elect not to process applications for a funding priority category where it is apparent that there are insufficient funds available to fund any applications within the priority category.

5. Corrections to Deficient Applications.

a. The General Section of the NOFA provides the procedures for corrections to deficient applications. Examples of correctable technical deficiencies include, but are not limited to: submission of a Form SF-424 or FSS application Form HUD-52651 with missing information or that lacks an original signature by an authorized official or an application package that is not received by the HUD field office Hub by the due date.

6. Unacceptable Applications. After the technical deficiency correction period (as provided in the General Section), the GMC will disapprove PHA applications that it determines are not acceptable for processing. Applications from PHAs that fall into any of the following categories are ineligible for funding under this NOFA and will not be processed:

a. An application submitted by an entity that is not an eligible PHA as defined under Section III.A. and Section III.C. of this FSS NOFA or an application that does not comply with the requirements of Section IV.B., IV.C. and IV.F. of this FSS NOFA.

b. An application from a PHA that does not meet the fair housing and civil rights compliance requirements of the General Section of the NOFA.

c. An application from a PHA that does not comply with the prohibition against lobbying activities of this NOFA.

d. An application from a PHA that as of the application due date has not made progress satisfactory to HUD in resolving serious outstanding Inspector General audit findings, or serious outstanding HUD management review or IPA audit findings for the Housing Choice Voucher program and/or Moderate Rehabilitation program or a “troubled” rating under SEMAP, and has not designated another contractor acceptable to HUD to administer the FSS program on behalf of the PHA as required in Section III.C.3.e. of this FSS NOFA.

e. An application from a PHA that has been debarred or otherwise disqualified from providing assistance under the program.

f. An application that did not meet the application due date and timely receipt requirements as specified in this NOFA and the General Section of the SuperNOFA.

g. Applications will not be funded which do not meet the Threshold requirements identified in this NOFA and the General Section of the SuperNOFA.

C. Anticipated Announcement and Award Dates

It is anticipated the announcement of Housing Choice Voucher FSS program coordinator awards will take place during either the month of September or October 2004.

VI. Award Administration Information Back to Top

A. Award Notices

Successful applicants will receive an award letter from HUD. Funding will be provided to successful applicants as an amendment to the Annual Contributions Contract (ACC) of the applicant PHA. In the case of awards to joint applicants, the funding will be provided as an amendment to the ACC of the lead PHA that was identified in the application.

Unsuccessful applicants will receive a notification of rejection letter from that GMC that will state the basis for the decision. The applicant may request an applicant debriefing. Beginning not less than 30 days after the awards for assistance are publicly announced in the Federal Register and for at least 120 days after awards for assistance are announced publicly, HUD will, upon receiving a written request, provide a debriefing to the requesting applicant. (See Section VI.A.3. of the General Section of the SuperNOFA for additional information regarding a debriefing.) Applicants requesting to be debriefed must send a written request to: Iredia Hutchinson, Director; Grants Management Center; U. S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, 501 School Street, SW., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20024.

B. Administrative and National Policy Requirements

1. Environmental Impact. No environmental review is required in connection with the award of assistance under this NOFA, because the NOFA only provides funds for employing a coordinator that provides public and supportive services, which are categorically excluded from environmental review under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321) and not subject to compliance actions for related environmental authorities under 24 CFR 50.19(b)(4) and (12).

2. HUD's Strategic Goals. HUD is committed to ensuring that programs result in the achievement of HUD's strategic mission. The FSS program and this FSS NOFA support the Department's strategic goals of increasing homeownership activities and helping HUD-assisted renters make progress toward self-sufficiency by giving funding preference to PHAs whose FSS programs show success in moving families to self-sufficiency and homeownership. You can find out about HUD's Strategic Framework and Annual Performance Plan at http://www.hud.gov/offices/cfo/reports/cforept.cfm.

3. HUD Policy Priorities. This NOFA supports the HUD policy priority of providing increased homeownership opportunities to program participants. In this NOFA, funding priority is given to those PHA applicants that demonstrate that their FSS families have participated in homeownership programs. See Section V.B.2. of the General Section of the SuperNOFA for a full discussion of HUD's policy priorities.

C. Reporting

Successful applicants must report activities of their FSS program participants through required submissions of the Form HUD-50058 FSS Addendum. HUD's assessment of the accomplishments of the FSS programs of PHAs funded under this NOFA will be based primarily on Public Housing Information Center (PIC) system data obtained from the Form HUD-50058. MTW PHAs that do not report to HUD on the Form HUD-50058 will be asked to submit an annual report to HUD with the same information on FSS program activities that is provided to HUD by non-MTW PHAs via the Form HUD-50058 FSS Addendum. In addition, HUD requires that funded recipients collect racial and ethnic beneficiary data. It has adopted the Office of Management and Budget's Standards for the Collection of Racial and Ethnic Data. In view of these requirements, funded recipients should use Form HUD-27061, Racial and Ethnic Data Reporting Form (found on http://www.HUDclips.org), a comparable program form, or a comparable electronic data system for this purpose.

VII. Agency Contacts Back to Top

A. For Technical Assistance

For answers to your questions, you may contact the Public and Indian Housing Resource Center at 800-955-2232. Persons with hearing or speech impairments may access this number via TTY (text telephone) by calling the Federal Information Relay Service at 800-877-8339. (These are toll-free numbers). Prior to the application deadline, staff at the numbers given above will be available to provide general guidance, but not guidance in actually preparing the application. Following selection, but prior to award, HUD staff will be available to assist in clarifying or confirming information that is a prerequisite to the offer of an award by HUD.

B. Satellite Broadcast

HUD will hold an information broadcast via satellite for potential applicants to learn more about the Housing Choice Voucher FSS program and preparation of an application. For more information about the date and time of this broadcast, you should consult the HUD website at www.hud.gov.

VIII. Other Information Back to Top

A. Electronic Application System

It is HUD's intention to move to a fully electronic application system in FY2005. Further information on this initiative can be found in the General Section of the SuperNOFA.

B. Paperwork Reduction Act

The information collection requirements contained in this document have been approved by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501-3520) and assigned OMB control number 2577-0178. In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act, HUD may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to, a collection of information unless the collection displays a currently valid OMB control number. Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average one hour per annum per respondent for the application and grant administration. This includes the time for collecting, reviewing, and reporting the data for the application and other required reporting. The information will be used for grantee selection and monitoring the administration of funds. Response to this request for information is required in order to receive the benefits to be derived.

C. Public Access, Documentation, and Disclosure

See Section VIII. F. of the General Section of the SuperNOFA.

BILLING CODE 4210-32-P

Public Housing Neighborhood Networks Program Back to Top

Overview Information Back to Top

A. Federal Agency Name: Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Public and Indian Housing.

B. Funding Opportunity Title: Public Housing Neighborhood Networks Program.

C. Announcement Type: Initial announcement.

D. Funding Opportunity Number: The Federal Register number for this NOFA is: FR-4900-N-32. The OMB approval number for this program is 2577-0229.

E. Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number(s): 14.870.

F. Dates: The application due date is June 17, 2004. Please see the General Section of the SuperNOFA for application submission, delivery, and timely receipt requirements.

G. Optional, Additional Overview Content Information:

1. Purpose of Program: The purpose of the Public Housing Neighborhood Networks program is to provide grants to public housing agencies (PHAs) to (a) update and expand existing Neighborhood Networks/community technology centers; or (b) establish new Neighborhood Networks (NN) community technology centers. Neighborhood Networks centers offer comprehensive services which are designed to help residents of public housing achieve long-term economic self-sufficiency.

2. Funding Available: The Department expects to award approximately $21.4 million under the Neighborhood Networks program in Fiscal Year 2004. This includes $14.9 million in Fiscal Year 2004 funds and approximately $6.5 million in carryover funds.

3. Award Amounts: Awards will range from $150,000 to $500,000.

4. Eligible Applicants. Eligible applicants are Public Housing Authorities (PHAs) only.

Tribes and tribally designated housing entities (TDHEs), nonprofit organizations, and resident associations are not eligible to apply for funding under the Public Housing Neighborhood Networks program.

5. Cost Sharing/Match Requirement: At least 25 percent of the requested grant amount is required as a match.

6. Grant term. The grant term for this funding category is three years from the execution date of the grant agreement.

Grant program Total funding Eligible applicants Maximum grant amount
Neighborhood Networks $21.4 million which includes $6.5 million in carryover funds PHAs—existing centers $150,000 for PHAs with 1-780 units. $200,000 for PHAs with 781-2,500 units. $300,000 for PHAs with 2,501-7,300 units. $400,000 for PHAs with 7,301 units or more.
PHAs—new centers $250,000 for PHAs with 1-780 units. $300,000 for PHAs with 781-2,500 units. $400,000 for PHAs with 2,501-7,300 units. $500,000 for PHAs with 7,301 units or more.

Full Text of Announcement Back to Top

I. Funding Opportunity Description Back to Top

A. Program Description

The Public Housing Neighborhood Networks program provides grants to PHAs to (1) update and expand existing Neighborhood Networks/community technology centers; or (2) establish new Neighborhood Networks (NN) community technology centers.

An existing computer center is: (1) A computer lab, or community technology center already owned and operated by a PHA which serves residents of public housing and which has not received prior Neighborhood Networks funding and therefore is not officially designated a HUD Public & Indian Housing (PIH) Neighborhood Networks center; (2) a computer lab officially designated a HUD PIH Neighborhood Networks center by virtue of prior funding received under this grant program, which seeks to expand its services; or (3) a computer lab in development which needs funding under this grant program to become fully operational and serve residents of public housing.

A new computer center is one that will be newly established (i.e., there is no infrastructure, space, or equipment currently in use for this purpose) with Neighborhood Networks grant funds.

Note:

An applicant previously funded under Neighborhood Networks may apply under the “New Computer Center” category only if it will develop a new center in a development which cannot be served by the applicant's existing NN center(s).

Neighborhood Networks centers should be located within a public housing development, on PHA land, or within reasonable walking distance to the PHA development(s) being served by the center.

HUD is looking for applications that implement comprehensive programs within the three year grant term which will result in improved economic self-sufficiency for public housing residents. HUD is looking for proposals that involve partnerships with organizations that will help supplement and enhance the services grantees offer to residents.

NN centers provide computer and Internet access to public housing residents and offer a full range of computer and job training services. Applicants should submit proposals that will incorporate computer and Internet use to: Provide job training for youth, adults and seniors; expand educational opportunities for residents; promote economic self-sufficiency and help residents transition from welfare to work; increase residents' use of the Internet and computer technology; assist school-age children and youth with homework; provide guidance and preparatory programming to high school students (or other interested residents) for post-secondary education (college or trade schools); and other services as deemed necessary by results obtained from resident surveys.

All applicants must complete a business plan (see sample HUD-52766 provided in the Appendix) covering the three-year grant term. Applicants' business plan and narrative must indicate how the centers will become self-sustaining after the grant term expires. Proposed grant activities should build on the foundation created by previous NN grants, Resident Opportunity and Self-Sufficiency (ROSS) grants, or other Federal, State and local self-sufficiency efforts.

Note

Any applicant that proposes one or more ineligible activity will not be funded.

B. Eligible Activities

1. Hiring of a Qualified Project Coordinator to Administer Grant Program. A qualified Project Coordinator must have two years of experience running a community technology center. The Project Coordinator should be hired for the entire term of your grant. The project coordinator should be responsible for ensuring that the center's programs achieve the proposal's goals and objectives. In addition, the project coordinator should be responsible for the following activities:

a. Marketing the program to residents;

b. Assessing participating residents' needs, interests, skills, and job-readiness;

c. Assessing participating residents' needs for supportive services, e.g. childcare, transportation;

d. Designing and coordinating grant activities based on residents' needs and interests; and

e. Monitoring the progress of program participants and evaluating the overall success of the program. For more information on how to measure performance, please see Rating Factor 5 in the “Application Review Information” section of this NOFA.

2. Literacy training and GED preparation;

3. Computer training, from basic to advanced;

4. College preparatory courses and information;

5. Job Training: Oral and written communication skills; work ethic; interpersonal and teamwork skills; resume writing; interviewing techniques, creating job training and placement programs with local employers and placement agencies; and post-employment follow-up to assist residents who are new to the workplace.

6. Physical improvements. Physical improvements must directly relate to providing space for a Neighborhood Networks center. Renovation, conversion, wiring, and repair costs may be essential parts of physical improvements. In addition, architectural, engineering, and related professional services required to prepare architectural plans or drawings, write-ups, specifications or inspections may also be part of the cost of implementing physical improvements.

a. Modifications to create a space that is accessible to persons with disabilities is an eligible use of funds. Refer to Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-87, “Cost Principles for State, Local and Indian Tribal Governments.”

b. The renovation, conversion, or joining of vacant dwelling units in a PHA development to create appropriate space for the equipment needs and activities of a NN center (computers, printers, and office space) are eligible activities for physical improvement.

c. The renovation, conversion of existing common areas in a PHA development to accommodate a NN center are eligible.

d. If renovation, conversion, or repair is done off-site, the PHA must provide documentation with its application that it has control of the proposed property for at least five years. Control can be demonstrated through a lease agreement, ownership documentation, or other appropriate documentation.

7. Maintenance and insurance costs. Includes installing and maintaining the hardware and software as well as insurance coverage for the space and equipment.

8. Purchase of computers, printers, software, and other peripheral equipment. Costs of computer hardware and software necessary to accommodate the needs of persons with disabilities are an eligible cost for this funding category;

9. Distance Learning Equipment. Distance learning equipment (including the costs for video casting and purchase/lease/rental of distance learning equipment) is an eligible use of funds provided your proposal indicates that the center will be working in a virtual setting with a college, university or other educational organization. If you operate more than one center, distance learning equipment can be used to link one or more centers so that residents using the different centers can benefit from courses being offered at only one site.

10. Security and related costs. Includes space and minor refitting, locks, and other equipment for safeguarding the center.

11. Hiring Residents. Grantees may hire residents to help with the implementation of this grant program.

12. Administrative costs. Administrative costs may include, but are not limited to, purchase of furniture, office equipment and supplies, local travel, and utilities. Administrative costs may not be used to pay for salaries of any kind. For both new and existing NN centers, administrative costs must not exceed 10 percent of the total grant amount requested from HUD. Administrative costs must adhere to OMB Circular A-87. Please use HUD-424-CBW to itemize your administrative costs. You may attach an additional sheet of paper to the HUD-424-CBW form if necessary in order to fully itemize your administrative costs.

C. Definition of Terms

1. Contract Administrator means an overall grant administrator or a financial management agent (or both) that oversees the implementation of the grant and/or the financial aspects of the grant. See the “Program Requirements” and “Threshold Requirements” sections for more information.

2. Senior person means a person who is at least 62 years of age.

3. Past Performance is a threshold requirement. Using Rating Factor 1, HUD's field offices will evaluate applicants for past performance to determine whether an applicant has the capacity to manage the grant for which they are applying. Field offices will evaluate the past performance of contract administrators for applicants required to have a contract administrator.

4. Person with disabilities means a person who:

a. Has a condition defined as a disability in section 223 of the Social Security Act;

b. Has a developmental disability as defined in section 102 of the Developmental Disabilities Assistance Bill of Rights Act; or

c. Is determined to have a physical, mental, or emotional impairment which:

(1) Is expected to be of long-continued and indefinite duration;

(2) Substantially impedes his or her ability to live independently; and

(3) Is of such a nature that such ability could be improved by more suitable housing conditions.

The term “person with disabilities” does not exclude persons who have acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) or any conditions arising from the etiologic agent for AIDS. In addition, no individual shall be considered a person with disabilities, for purposes of eligibility for low-income housing, solely on the basis of any drug or alcohol dependence.

The definition provided above for persons with disabilities is the proper definition for determining program qualifications. However, the definition of a person with disabilities contained in section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and its implementing regulations must be used for purposes of reasonable accommodations.

5. Project Coordinator is a person who is responsible for coordinating the grantee's approved activities to ensure that grant goals and objectives are met. A qualified project coordinator is someone with at least two years of experience working on supportive services designed specifically for typically underserved populations. The project coordinator and grantee are both responsible for ensuring that all federal requirements are followed.

6. Secretary means the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development.

D. Regulations Governing the Neighborhood Networks Grant

The Neighborhood Networks program is governed by regulations in 24 CFR parts 905 and 968.

II. Award Information Back to Top

A. Total Funding

The Department expects to award approximately $21.4 million under the Neighborhood Networks program in Fiscal Year 2004. Awards will be made as follows:

1. Fifty percent of available funding for Neighborhood Networks will provide grants for updating and expanding existing computer technology centers. The other 50 percent will provide grants to establish and operate new Neighborhood Networks centers.

2. PHAs must use the number of occupied conventional family public housing units as of September 30, 2003 per their budget to determine the maximum grant amount they are eligible for in accordance with the categories listed below. PHAs should clearly indicate on the Fact Sheet (HUD-52751) the number of units under management.

a. Funding Levels For Existing Centers:

Number of conventional units Maximum funding
1-780 units $150,000
781-2,500 units $200,000
2,501-7,300 units $300,000
7,301 or more units $400,000

b. Funding Levels For New Centers:

Number of conventional units Maximum funding
1-780 units $250,000
781-2,500 units $300,000
2,501-7,300 units $400,000
7,301 or more units $500,000

B. Grant Period

Three years. The grant period shall begin the day the grant agreement and the form HUD-1044, “Assistance Award/Amendment” are signed by both the grantee and HUD.

C. Grant Extensions

Requests to extend the grant term beyond the originally established grant term must be submitted in writing by the grantee to the local HUD field office. Such requests must be done prior to grant termination and with enough notice to give the field office a reasonable amount of time to fully evaluate the request. Requests must explain why the extension is necessary, what work remains to be completed, and what work and progress was accomplished to date.

D. Type of Award

Grant agreement.

E. Subcontracting

Subcontracting is permitted. Grantees must follow the HUD federal procurement regulations found at 24 CFR 85.36.

III. Eligibility Information Back to Top

A. Eligible Applicants

Public Housing Authorities are eligible to apply for this funding category. Tribes/TDHEs, nonprofit organizations, and resident associations are not eligible to apply for this funding category.

B. Cost Sharing or Matching

All applicants are required to obtain a 25 percent cash or in-kind match. The match is a threshold requirement. Applicants who do not demonstrate the minimum 25 percent match will fail the threshold requirement and will not receive further consideration for funding. Please see the section below on threshold requirements for more information on what is required for the match.

C. Other

1. Threshold Requirements: Applicants must respond to each threshold requirement clearly and thoroughly by following the instructions below. If your application fails one threshold requirement (regardless of the type of threshold) it will be considered a failed application and will not receive consideration for funding.

a. Match. All applicants are required to have in place a firmly committed 25 percent match in cash or in-kind donations as defined in this paragraph. Joint applicants must together have at least a 25 percent match. Applicants who do not demonstrate the minimum 25 percent match will fail this threshold requirement and will not receive further consideration for funding. If you are also applying for funding under the ROSS grant program, you must use different sources of match donations for each grant application and you must indicate which additional ROSS grant(s) you are applying for by attaching an additional page to HUD budget Form 424-CBW stating the sources and amounts of each of your match contributions for this application as well as any other HUD grant program to which you are applying. Match donations must be firmly committed. Firmly committed means that the amount of match resources and their dedication to Neighborhood Networks-funded activities must be explicit, in writing and signed by a person authorized to make the commitment. Letters of commitment and Memoranda of Understanding (MOU) must be on organization letterhead, and signed by a person authorized to make the stated commitment whether it be in cash or in-kind services. The letters of commitment/MOUs must indicate the total dollar value of the commitment, be dated within two months of the application deadline, and indicate how the commitment will relate to the proposed program. The commitment should be available at time of award. Applicants proposing to use their own, non-HUD grant funds to meet the match requirement in whole or in part, must also include a letter of commitment indicating the type of match (cash or in-kind) and how the match will be used. Grant awards shall be contingent upon letters of commitment being submitted with your application.

Leveraging in excess of the 25 percent of the grant amount will receive a higher point value.

(1) Volunteer time and services shall be computed by using the normal professional rate for the local area or the national minimum wage rate of $5.15 per hour. (Note: applicants may not count their staff time towards the match.) If grantees propose to use volunteers for development or operations work that would otherwise be subject to payment of Davis-Bacon or HUD-determined prevailing wage rates (including construction, rehabilitation or maintenance) their services must be computed using the appropriate Davis-Bacon or HUD-determined wage rates. More information on these wage rates can be found at: http://www.hud.gov, by contacting HUD Field Office Labor Relations staff, or from the PHA. Such volunteers must also meet the requirements of section 12(b) of the United States Housing Act of 1937 and 24 CFR part 70;

(2) In order for HUD to determine the value of any donated material, equipment, staff time, building, or lease, your application must provide a letter from the organization making the donation stating the value of the contribution.

(3) Other resources/services that can be committed include: in-kind services such as contributions of administrative services provided to the applicant; funds from federal sources as allowed by statute, including for example Community Development Block Grant (CDBG); funds from any state or local government sources; and funds from private contributions. Applicants may also partner with other program funding recipients to coordinate the use of resources in the target area.

b. Past Performance. HUD's field offices will evaluate data provided by applicants as well as applicants' past performance to determine whether applicants have the capacity to manage the grant for which they are applying. Field offices will evaluate the contract administrators' past performance for applicants required to have a contract administrator. Using Rating Factor 1, the field office will evaluate applicants' past performance. Applicants should carefully review Rating Factor 1 to ensure their application addresses each of the criteria requested therein. If applicants fail to address what is requested in Rating Factor 1, their application will fail this threshold and will not receive further consideration.

c. Contract Administrator Partnership Agreement. PHAs that are troubled at time of application are required to submit a signed Contract Administrator Partnership Agreement. The agreement must be for the entire grant term. Grant awards shall be contingent upon having a signed Contract Administrator Partnership Agreement included in the application. Applicants required to have a Contract Administrator Partnership Agreement that fail to submit one will fail this threshold requirement and will not receive further consideration for funding.

Troubled PHAs are not eligible to be contract administrators. Grant writers who assist applicants prepare their Neighborhood Networks applications are also ineligible to be contract administrators

For more information on contract administrators, see the section “Program Requirements.”

d. Minimum Score for All Fundable Applications. Applications that pass all threshold requirements and go through the ranking and rating process, must receive a minimum score of 75 in order to be considered for funding.

e. The Dun and Bradstreet Universal Numbering System (DUNS) Number Requirement. Refer to the General Section of the SuperNOFA for information regarding the DUNS requirement. You will need to obtain a DUNS number to receive an award from HUD. This threshold requirement is curable.

f. Ineligible Activities. Any application that proposes an ineligible activity will be disqualified and not considered for funding.

g. Applicants that request funding in excess of the maximum grant which they are eligible to receive will not receive funding consideration.

2. Program Requirements:

a. Program Evaluations. A portion of grant funds should be reserved to ensure that evaluations can be completed for all participants who received training through this program. Applicants may, for example, propose to reserve one percent of grant funds for every 10 students they train for the purpose of evaluating students' success in the program.

b. Physical Improvements. All renovations must meet appropriate accessibility requirements, including the requirements of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 at 24 CFR part 8, Architectural Barriers Act at 24 CFR part 40, the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Fair Housing Act. Compliance with the Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards shall be deemed to comply with the requirements of 24 CFR 8.21, 8.22, 8.232, and 8.25 with respect to buildings.

c. Contract Administrator. The contract administrator must assure that the financial management system and procurement procedures that will be in place during the grant term will fully comply with 24 CFR 85. CAs are expressly forbidden from accessing HUD's Line of Credit Control System (LOCCS) and submitting vouchers on behalf of grantees. Contract administrators must also assist PHAs meet HUD's reporting requirements, see Section VI.(C) “Reporting” for more information. Contract administrators may be: Local housing agencies; community-based organizations such as community development corporations (CDCs), churches, temples, synagogues, mosques; nonprofit organizations; state/regional associations and organizations. Troubled PHAs are not eligible to be contract administrators. Grant writers who assist applicants prepare their Neighborhood Networks applications are also ineligible to be contract administrators. Organizations that the applicant proposes to use as the contract administrator must not violate or be in violation of other conflicts of interest as defined in 24 CFR part 84 and 24 CFR part 85.

3. Number of Applications Permitted:

a. General. Applicants may submit only one application for a NN grant.

b. Joint applications. Two or more applicants may join together to submit a joint application for proposed grant activities. Joint applications must designate a lead applicant. Both lead and non-lead applicants are subject to threshold requirements. Applicants who submit joint applications may not also submit separate applications as sole applicants under this NOFA. NOTE: The lead applicant will determine the maximum funding amount the applicants are eligible to receive.

4. Eligible Participants: All program participants must be residents of conventional public housing. Participants in the Public Housing Family Self-Sufficiency (FSS) program (non Housing Choice Voucher FSS Program) are also eligible to participate in activities funded under Neighborhood Networks.

5. Eligible Developments: Only conventional public housing developments may be served by Neighborhood Networks grant funds. Other housing/developments, including, but not limited to: private housing, federally-insured housing, federally subsidized or assisted (i.e., assisted under Section 8, Section 202, Section 811, Section 236), and others are not eligible to participate in Neighborhood Networks.

6. Energy Star. HUD has adopted a wide-ranging energy action plan for improving energy efficiency in all program areas. As a first step toward implementing the energy plan, HUD, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Energy (DoE) have signed a joint partnership to promote energy efficiency in HUD's affordable housing efforts and programs. The purpose of the Energy Star partnership is to promote energy efficiency of the affordable housing stock, but also to help protect the environment. Applicants constructing, rehabilitating, or maintaining housing or community facilities are encouraged to promote energy efficiency in design and operations. They are urged especially to purchase and use Energy Star labeled products. Applicants providing housing assistance or counseling services are encouraged to promote Energy Star building by homebuyers and renters. Program activities can include developing Energy Star promotional and information materials, outreach to low- and moderate-income renters and buyers on the benefits and savings when using Energy Star products and appliances, and promoting the designation of community buildings and homes as Energy Star compliant. For further information about Energy Star, see http://www.energystar.gov or call 888-STAR-YES (888-782-7937) or for the hearing-impaired, 888-588-9920 TTY.

7. Environmental Impact. Some activities under this Neighborhood Networks program section will be categorically excluded and not subject to environmental review under 24 CFR 58.34(a)(3), (a)(8) or (a)(9), 58.35(b)(2) or (b)(3), 50.19(b)(3), (b)(8), (b)(9), (b)(12), or (b)(13) but some will be subject to environmental review. Any applicant proposing any long-term leasing or physical development activities, and its partners, are prohibited from constructing, rehabilitating, converting, leasing, repairing or constructing property, or committing or expending HUD or non-HUD funds for these types of program activities, until one of the following has occurred:

a. If the grantee is not a PHA or tribe/TDHE, HUD has completed an environmental review to the extent required by 24 CFR part 50, prior to grant award.

b. If the grantee is a PHA or tribe/TDHE, HUD has approved the grantee's Request for Release of Funds (HUD Form 7015.15) following a Responsible Entity's completion of an environmental review under 24 CFR part 58, where required, or if HUD has determined in accordance with § 58.11 to perform the environmental review itself under part 50, HUD has completed the environmental review.

8. Wage Rates. Laborers and mechanics employed in the development and operation of Neighborhood Networks facilities on property that is subject to an Annual Contributions Contract must be paid Davis-Bacon or HUD-determined prevailing wage rates, respectively, unless they meet the qualifications of a volunteer (see section III.C.1.a of this program section).

9. Compliance with Program Requirements. All applicants and grantees must comply with the program requirements contained in Section III (C) of the General Section of the SuperNOFA.

IV. Application and Submission Information Back to Top

A. Addresses to Request Application Package

There is no application kit this year. All forms and necessary information for applying are contained within this NOFA. Please refer to the General Section of the SuperNOFA for information on how to obtain hard copies of this NOFA. You may also visit http://www.hud.gov for this information.

B. Content and Form of Application Submission

1. Application Preparation: Before preparing an application for Neighborhood Networks funding, applicants should carefully review the program description, program requirements, ineligible activities, and threshold requirements, which are contained in this NOFA. Applicants should also review each rating factor found in the “Application Review Information” section before writing a narrative response. Applicants' narratives should be as descriptive as possible, ensuring that every requested item is addressed. Applicants should make sure to include all requested information, according to the instructions found in this NOFA and where applicable, in the General Section of the SuperNOFA. This will help ensure a fair and accurate review of your application.

2. Content and Format for Submission: In order to be funded, applicants must propose programs which meet all the requirements and objectives of the Neighborhood Networks program as described in this NOFA. Applicants are reminded that any application proposing ineligible activities will not be funded. Finally, applicants must submit their applications according to the “Format” section below.

a. Content of Application:

Applicants must write narrative responses to each of the rating factors which follow this section. Applicants will be evaluated on whether their responses demonstrate that they have the necessary capacity to successfully manage this grant program. Applicants should ensure that their narratives are written clearly and concisely so that HUD reviewers, who may not be familiar with the Neighborhood Networks program, may fully understand your proposal. HUD encourages applicants to carefully review each rating factor, the regulations governing the Neighborhood Networks program, 24 CFR parts 905 and 968, and the General Section of the SuperNOFA prior to responding to the rating factors.

b. Format of Application:

(1) Applications may not exceed 35 narrative pages. Narrative pages must be typed, double-spaced, numbered, use Times New Roman font style, and font size 12. Applications should be submitted in a three-ring binder with materials organized behind tabs according to the outline provided below. Supporting documentation, required forms, and certificates will not be counted toward the 35 narrative page limit. However, applicants should make every effort to submit only what is necessary in terms of supporting documentation.

(2) Format for submission of SuperNOFA forms, NN forms and narrative responses.

TAB 1: Required Forms from the General Section of the SuperNOFA and other NN forms:

1. Application for Federal Assistance (SF-424);

2. Supplement to SF-424—Survey on Ensuring Equal Opportunity for Applicants (SF-23004);

3. Questionnaire for HUD's Initiative on Removal of Regulatory Barriers (HUD-27300);

4. Fact Sheet (HUD-52751);

5. Applicant Assurances and Certifications (HUD-424B);

6. Grant Application Detailed Budget (HUD-424-CB);

7. Grant Application Detailed Budget Worksheet (HUD-424-CBW);

8. Applicant/Recipient Disclosure/Update Report (HUD-2880);

9. Certification of Consistency with RC/EZ/EC Strategic Plan (HUD-2990) if applicable;

10. Certification of Consistency with the Consolidated Plan (HUD-2991) if applicable;

11. Disclosure of Lobbying Activities (HUD-SF-LLL)—if applicable;

12. Disclosure of Lobbying Activities Continuation Sheet (HUD-SF-LLL-A)—if applicable;

13. Acknowledgment of Application Receipt (HUD-2993); and,

14. Client Comments and Suggestions (HUD-2994). (Optional)

TAB 2: Threshold Requirements:

1. Letters from Partners attesting to match;

2. Letter from Applicant's organization attesting to match (if applicant is contributing to match); and

3. Contract Administrator Partnership Agreement (required for troubled PHAs) (HUD-52755).

TAB 3: Narrative for Rating Factor 1 and NN Program Forms

1. Narrative

2. Chart A: Program Staffing (HUD-52756)

3. Chart B: Applicant/Administrator Track Record (HUD-52757)

4. Resumes/Position Descriptions

TAB 4: Narrative for Rating Factor 2

TAB 5: Rating Factor 3

1. Narrative

2. Business Plan (see sample) (HUD-52766)

TAB 6: Narrative for Rating Factor 4

TAB 7: Narrative for Rating Factor 5 and NN Program Forms

1. Narrative

2. Logic Model (HUD-96010);

3. Sample Performance measures/outcomes are attached for applicants' information

C. Submission Dates and Times

1. Due Dates: Applications are due on June 17, 2004. Please see the General Section of the SuperNOFA for application submission, delivery, and timely receipt requirements.

2. Proof of Timely Submission. Please see the General Section of the SuperNOFA for more information about how to mail in your application to HUD and how HUD will determine whether your application is received by the deadline. Applicants that fail to meet the deadline for application receipt will not receive funding consideration.

D. Intergovernmental Review

Not applicable.

E. Funding Restrictions

1. Reimbursement for Grant Application Costs: Applicants who receive an award under NN are prohibited from using NN grant funds to reimburse any costs incurred in conjunction with preparation of their NN grant application.

2. Covered Salaries:

a. Project Coordinator: All applicants may propose to hire a qualified project coordinator to run the grant program. The Neighborhood Networks program will fund up to $ 63,000 in combined annual salary and fringe benefits for a full-time project coordinator. The project coordinator's salary and fringe benefits may not exceed more than 30 percent of the total grant amount. For audit purposes, applicants must have documentation on file demonstrating that the salary they pay the project coordinator is comparable to similar professions in their local area.

b. Hiring Residents: Grantees may hire residents to help with the implementation of this grant program. No more than five percent of grant funds can be used for this purpose.

c. NN funds may only be used for the types of salaries described in this section according to the restrictions described herein. NN funds may not be used to pay for salaries of any other kind.

3. Administrative Costs. Administrative costs may include, but are not limited to, purchase of furniture, office equipment and supplies, local travel, and utilities. Administrative costs may not be used to pay for salaries of any kind. Administrative costs must not exceed 10 percent of the total grant amount requested from HUD. Administrative costs must adhere to OMB Circular A-87. Please use HUD-424-CBW to itemize your administrative costs.

4. Ineligible Activities/Costs. Grant funds may not be used for ineligible activities:

a. Payment of wages and/or salaries to participants for receiving supportive services and/or training programs;

b. Purchase, lease, or rental of land;

c. Purchase, lease, or rental of vehicles;

d. Entertainment costs;

e. Purchasing food;

f. Service Coordinator salary and fringe benefits;

g. Stipends;

h. Cost of application preparation;

i. Costs which exceed limits identified in the NOFA for the following: Project Coordinator, resident salaries, physical improvements (see below) and administrative expenses; and

j. Costs not eligible under section 9(d)(1)(E) of the U.S. Housing Act of 1937.

5. Physical Improvements. For new centers, expenses for physical improvements may not exceed 20 percent of the total grant amount requested from HUD. For existing centers, expenses for physical improvements may not exceed 10 percent of the total grant amount.

F. Other Submission Requirements

1. Mailing Applications. Applicants to the NN program should send their applications to: HUD Grants Management Center, Mail Stop: Neighborhood Networks, 2001 Jefferson Davis Hwy, Suite 703; Arlington, VA 22202. Please see the General Section of the SuperNOFA for detailed mailing and delivery instructions.

2. Number of Copies. Applications must be submitted in triplicate (one original and two identical copies). The original and one identical copy must be sent to the Grants Management Center by the deadline. The other identical copy must be submitted to your local HUD field office by the deadline.

V. Application Review Information Back to Top

A. Criteria

1. Factors for Award Used to Evaluate and Rate Applications to the Neighborhood Networks program: The factors for rating and ranking applicants and maximum points for each factor are provided below. The maximum number of points available for this program is 102. This includes two RC/EZ/EC bonus points. The SuperNOFA contains a certification that must be completed in order for the applicant to be considered for RC/EZ/EC bonus points. A listing of federally designated RCs, EZs, ECs, and EECs is included as an appendix to the General Section of the SuperNOFA and is also available from the NOFA Information Center, and the HUD Web site, http://www.hud.gov. The agency certifying to RC/EZ/EC status must be listed in the appendix of the SuperNOFA or on the http://www.hud.gov Web site.

Note:

Applicants should carefully review each rating factor before writing a response. Applicants' narratives should be as descriptive as possible, ensuring that every requested item is addressed. Applicants should make sure their narratives thoroughly address the Rating Factors below and include all requested information, according to the instructions found in this NOFA. This will help ensure a fair and accurate application review.

a. Rating Factor 1: Capacity of the Applicant and Relevant Organizational Staff (25 Points)

This factor addresses whether the applicant has the organizational resources necessary to successfully implement the proposed activities within the grant period. In rating this factor HUD will consider the extent to which the proposal demonstrates that the applicant will have qualified and experienced staff dedicated to administering the program.

(1) Proposed Program Staffing (12 Points).

(a) Staff Experience (4 Points). The knowledge and experience of the proposed project coordinator, staff, and partners in planning and managing programs for which funding is being requested. Experience will be judged in terms of recent, relevant and successful experience of proposed staff to undertake eligible program activities. In rating this factor, HUD will consider experience within the last 5 years to be recent; experience pertaining to the specific activities being proposed to be relevant; and experience producing specific accomplishments to be successful. The more recent the experience and the more experience proposed staff members who work on the project have in successfully conducting and completing similar activities, the greater the number of points applicants will receive for this rating factor. If proposed staff has experience both in providing community technology services and in delivering social service programs to typically underserved populations, applicants will receive a maximum score. If proposed staff has experience in only one area, applicants will receive two points. If proposed staff has experience in neither area, applicants will receive a score of 0 for this subfactor.

The following information should be provided in order to provide HUD an understanding of the proposed staff's experience and capacity:

(i) The number of staff years (one staff year = 2080 hours) to be allocated to the program by each employee or expert as well as each of their roles in the program;

(ii) The staff's relevant educational background and/or work experience;

(iii) Relevant and successful experience running programs whose activities include social services and computer programs that are similar to the eligible program activities described in this NOFA;

(b) Hiring Residents (3 points). Three points will be awarded if applicants commit to hiring one to three residents. Small PHAs should hire one person, medium PHAs should hire one to two people, and large PHAs should hire three people in order to get the maximum score.

(c) Organizational Capacity (5 Points). Applicants will be evaluated based on whether they have, and/or whether their partners have sufficient qualified personnel to deliver the proposed activities in a timely and effective fashion. In order to enhance or supplement capacity, applicants should provide evidence of partnerships with nonprofit organizations or other organizations that have experience providing community technology services to typically underserved populations. Applicants' narrative must describe their ability to immediately begin the proposed work program. Attach resumes and position descriptions (where staff is not yet hired) for all key applicant and partner personnel. (Resumes/position descriptions do not count toward the 35-page limit.)

(2) Past Performance of Applicant/ Contract Administrator (6 Points) Applicants' narrative must describe how they (or their Contract Administrator) successfully implemented grant programs (including those listed below) designed to promote resident self-sufficiency or moving from welfare to work. Applicants' past experience may include, but is not limited to, running programs aimed at assisting residents of low-income housing achieve economic self-sufficiency; i.e. ROSS grants and Youthbuild. Applicants' narrative must indicate the grants they received and managed, the grant amounts, and grant terms (years) of the grants which they are counting towards past experience. Applicants will be evaluated according to the following criteria:

(a) Achievement of specific measurable outcomes and objectives in terms of benefits gained by participating residents. Applicants should describe results their programs have obtained, (e.g. higher incomes, improved grades, higher rates of employment, increased savings, improved literacy, etc.);

(b) Description of timely grant expenditure throughout the term of past grants. Timely means regular drawdowns throughout the life of the grant, i.e. quarterly drawdowns, with all funds expended by the end of the grant term;

(c) Description of past leveraging. Applicants must describe how they have leveraged funding or in-kind services beyond that which was originally proposed to be used for past projects;

(3) Program Administration and Fiscal Management. (7 Points)

(a) Program Administration. (4 Points). Applicants should describe how they will manage the program; how HUD can be sure that there is program accountability; and provide a description of proposed staff's roles and responsibilities. Applicants should also describe how grant staff, and partners will report to the project coordinator and other senior staff.

(b) Fiscal Management. (3 Points) In rating this factor, applicants' skills and experience in fiscal management will be evaluated. If applicants have had any audit or material weakness findings in the past five years, they will be evaluated on how well they have addressed them. Applicants must provide the following:

(i) A complete description of their fiscal management structure, including fiscal controls currently in place including those of a Contract Administrator for applicants required to have a Contract Administrator (i.e., troubled PHAs);

(ii) Applicants must list any audit findings in the past five years (HUD Inspector General, management review, fiscal, etc.), material weaknesses and what has been done to address them;

(iii) For applicants who are required to have a Contract Administrator, describe the skills and experience the Contract Administrator has in managing federal funds.

b. Rating Factor 2: Need/Extent of the Problem (20 Points)

This factor addresses the extent to which there is a need for funding an applicant's proposed program. In responding to this factor, applicants will be evaluated on the extent to which they describe and document the level of need for their proposed activities and the urgency for meeting the need.

Applicants should use statistics and analyses contained in data source(s) that are sound and reliable. Data that describes socioeconomic conditions at the local level can be found by going to the following Web sites: http://www.bls.gov (Bureau of Labor Statistics) or http://www.census.gov (US Census). Other types of sources include socioeconomic studies or reports conducted by academic, State, and local organizations. To the extent possible, the data applicants use should be specific to the area where the proposed activities will be carried out. Applicants should document needs as they apply to the area where activities will be targeted, and not the entire region or state.

In responding to this factor, applicants must include:

(1) Socioeconomic Profile (5 points). A thorough socioeconomic profile of the eligible residents to be served by an applicant's program, including education levels, income levels, the number of single-parent families, economic statistics for the local area, etc.

(2) Local Training Program Information (5 points). Information on training programs currently available and easily accessible to residents either through the PHA or other local or state community organizations.

(3) Local Social Services Information (5 points). Information on social service programs currently available and easily accessible to residents either through the PHA or other local or state community organizations.

(4) Demonstrated Link Between Proposed Activities and Local Need (5 points). Applicants' narrative must demonstrate a clear relationship between proposed activities, community needs and the purpose of the program funding in order for points to be awarded for this factor.

c. Rating Factor 3: Soundness of Approach (25 Points)

This factor addresses both the quality and cost-effectiveness of applicants' proposed business plan. The business plan must indicate a clear relationship between proposed activities, the targeted population's needs, and the purpose of the program funding. Applicants' activities must address HUD's policy priorities outlined in this Rating Factor.

In rating this factor HUD will consider:

(1) Quality of the Business Plan (13 points). This factor evaluates both the applicants' business plan and budget which will be evaluated based on the following criteria:

(a) Specific Services and/or Activities (5 points). Applicants' narrative must describe the specific services, course curriculum, and activities they plan to offer and who will be responsible for each. In addition to the narrative, applicants must also provide a business plan which must list the specific services, activities, and outcomes they expect. The business plan must show a logical order of activities and progress and must tie to the outcomes and outputs applicants identify in the Logic Model (see Rating Factor 5). Please see a sample business plan in the Appendix (HUD-52766). Applicants' narrative must explain how their proposed activities will:

(i) Involve community partners in the delivery of services; and

(ii) Offer comprehensive services versus a small range of services geared toward enhancing economic opportunities for residents.

(b) Feasibility and Demonstrable Benefits (4 points). This factor examines whether applicants' business plan is logical, feasible and likely to achieve its stated purpose during the term of the grant. HUD's desire is to fund applications that will quickly produce demonstrable results and advance the purposes of the Neighborhood Networks program.

(i) Timeliness. This subfactor evaluates whether applicants' business plan demonstrates that their project is ready to be implemented shortly after grant award, but not to exceed three months following the execution of the grant agreement. The business plan must indicate timeframes and deadlines for accomplishing major activities.

(ii) Description of the problem and solution. The business plan will be evaluated based on how well applicants' proposed activities address the needs described in Rating Factor 2.

(c) Budget Appropriateness/Efficient Use of Grant. (4 Points) The score in this factor will be based on the following:

(i) Justification of expenses. Applicants will be evaluated based on whether their expenses are reasonable, well-explained, and support the objectives of their proposal.

(ii) Budget Efficiency. Applicants will be evaluated based on whether their application requests funds commensurate with the level of effort necessary to accomplish their goals and anticipated results.

(2) Addressing HUD's Policy Priorities (12 points). HUD wants to improve the quality of life for those living in distressed communities. HUD's grant programs are a vehicle through which long-term, positive change can be achieved at the community level. Applicants' narrative and business plan will be evaluated based on how well they meet the following HUD policy priorities:

(a) Improving the Quality of Life in Our Nation's Communities (5 points). In order to receive points in this category, applicants' narrative and business plan must indicate the types of activities, services, and training programs applicants will offer which can help residents successfully transition from welfare to work and earn higher wages, or for elderly/disabled residents, to continue to live independently.

(b) Providing Full and Equal Access to Grassroots Faith-Based and Other Community-Based Organizations in HUD Program Implementation (5 points). HUD encourages applicants to partner with grassroots organizations, e.g., civic organizations, grassroots faith-based and other community-based organizations that are not usually effectively utilized. These grassroots organizations have a strong history of providing vital community services such as developing first-time homeownership programs, creating economic development programs, providing job training and other supportive services. In order to receive points under this factor, applicants' narrative and business plan must describe how applicants will work with these organizations and what types of services they will provide.

(c) Policy Priority for Increasing the Supply of Affordable Housing Through the Removal of Regulatory Barriers to Affordable Housing. (up to 2 points)

Under this policy priority, higher rating points are available to (1) governmental applicants that are able to demonstrate successful efforts in removing regulatory barriers to affordable housing, and (2) nongovernmental applicants that are associated with jurisdictions that have undertaken successful efforts in removing barriers. For applicants to obtain the policy priority points for efforts to successfully remove regulatory barriers, applicants should complete Form HUD-27300, “Questionnaire for HUD's Initiative on Removal of Regulatory Barriers.” A copy of HUD's Notice entitled America's Affordable Communities Initiative, HUD's Initiative on Removal of Regulatory Barriers: Announcement of Incentive Criteria on Barrier Removal in HUD's 2004 Competitive Funding Allocations'' can be found on HUD's Web site at http://www.hud.gov/grants/index.cfm. A description of the policy priority and a copy of Form HUD-27300 can be found in the General Section to the SuperNOFA. Applicants are encouraged to read the Notice as well as the general section of the SuperNOFA to obtain an understanding of this policy priority and how it can impact their score. A limited number of questions expressly request the applicant to provide brief documentation with their response. Other questions require that for each affirmative statement made, the applicant must supply a reference, URL, or a brief statement indicating where the back-up information may be found, and a point of contact, including a telephone number or email address.

d. Rating Factor 4: Leveraging Resources (20 Points)

This factor addresses the applicant's ability to secure community resources that can be combined with HUD's grant resources to achieve program purposes. Applicants are required to create partnerships with organizations that can help achieve their program's goals. PHAs are required by section 12(d)(7) of the U.S. Housing Act of 1937 (entitled “Cooperation Agreements for Economic Self-Sufficiency Activities”) to make best efforts to enter into such agreements with relevant state or local agencies. In rating this factor, HUD will look at the extent to which applicants partner, coordinate and leverage their services and resources with other organizations serving the same or similar populations.

Additionally, applicants must have at least a 25 percent cash or in-kind match. The match is a threshold requirement. Joint applicants must together have at least a 25 percent match. Applicants who do not demonstrate the minimum 25 percent match will fail the threshold requirement and will not receive further consideration for funding. Leveraging in excess of the 25 percent of the grant amount will receive a higher point value. In evaluating this factor HUD will consider the extent to which applicants have partnered with other entities to secure additional resources which will increase the effectiveness of the proposed program activities. The additional resources and services must be firmly committed, must support the proposed grant activities and must, in combined amount (including in-kind contributions of personnel, space and/or equipment, and monetary contributions) equal at least 25 percent of the grant amount requested in this application. “Firmly committed” means that the amount of resources and their dedication to Neighborhood Networks-funded activities must be explicit, in writing, and signed by a person authorized to make the commitment. Please see the section on Threshold Requirements for more information.

Points for this factor will be awarded based on the documented evidence of partnerships and firm commitments and the ratio of requested Neighborhood Networks funds to the total proposed grant budget.

Points will be assigned based on the following scale:

Percentage of match Points awarded
25 5 points (with partnerships) 3 points (without partnerships).
26-50 10 points (with partnerships) 8 points (without partnerships).
51-75 15 points (with partnerships) 13 points (without partnerships).
76-99 or above 20 points (with partnerships) 18 points (without partnerships).

e. Rating Factor 5: Achieving Results and Program Evaluation (10 Points)

An important element in this year's NOFA is the development and reporting of performance measures and outcomes. This factor emphasizes HUD's determination to ensure that applicants meet commitments made in their applications and grant agreements and that they assess their performance so that they realize performance goals. Applicants must demonstrate how they propose to measure their success and outcomes as they relate to the Department's Strategic Plan. HUD requires NN applicants to develop an effective, quantifiable, outcome-oriented plan for measuring performance and determining that goals have been met. Applicants must use the Logic Model Form (HUD-96010) for this purpose.

Applicants must establish interim benchmarks, or outputs, for their proposed program that lead to the ultimate achievement of outcomes. “Outputs” are the direct products of a program's activities. Examples of outputs are: the number of eligible families that participate in supportive services, the number of new services provided, the number of residents receiving counseling, or the number of households using a technology center. Outputs should produce outcomes for your program.

“Outcomes” are benefits accruing to the residents, families and/or communities during or after participation in the NN program. Applicants must clearly identify the outcomes to be achieved and measured. Examples of outcomes are: increasing the homeownership rates among residents of a development or from a particular housing authority, increasing residents' financial stability (e.g. increasing assets of a household through savings), or increasing employment stability (e.g., whether persons assisted obtain or retain employment for one or two years after job training completion). Outcomes are not the actual development or delivery of services or program activities.

This rating factor requires that applicants identify program outputs, outcomes, and performance indicators that will allow applicants to measure their performance. Performance indicators should be objectively quantifiable and measure actual achievements against anticipated achievements. Applicants' narrative, business plan, and Logic Model should identify what applicants are going to measure, how they are going to measure it, and the steps they have in place to make adjustments to their business plan and management practices if performance targets begin to fall short of established benchmarks and timeframes. Applicants' proposal must also show how they will measure the performance of partners and affiliates. Applicants must include the standards, data sources, and measurement methods they will use to measure performance.

In order to respond to this factor, applicants should use the sample performance measures located in the Appendix (HUD-52758) as a guide. Applicants will be evaluated based on how comprehensively they propose to measure their program's outcomes.

B. Review and Selection Process

1. Review Process. Four types of reviews will be conducted: a screening to determine if you are eligible to apply for funding under the Neighborhood Networks category; whether your application submission is complete, on time and meets threshold; a review by the field office to evaluate past performance; and a technical review to rate your application based on the five rating factors provided in this NOFA.

2. Selection Process: The selection process is designed to achieve geographic diversity of grant awards throughout the country. HUD will first select the highest ranked application from each of the ten federal regions. After this “round,” HUD will select the second highest ranked application in each of the ten federal regions for funding (the second round). HUD will continue this process with the third, fourth, and so on, highest ranked applications in each federal region until the last complete round is selected for funding. If available funds exist to fund some but not all eligible applications in the next round, HUD will make awards to those remaining applications in rank order (by score) regardless of region and will fully fund as many as possible with remaining funds. If remaining funds are too small to make an award, they will be applied to funding the Fiscal Year 2005 Neighborhood Networks program, assuming new funding is made available.

3. Tie Scores. In the event of a tie between two applications, HUD will select the application that was received first.

4. Deficiency Period. Applicants will have fourteen calendar days in which to provide missing information requested from HUD. For other information on correcting deficient applications, please see the General Section of the SuperNOFA.

VI. Award Administration Information Back to Top

A. Award Notices

HUD will make announcements of grant awards after the rating and ranking process is completed. Grantees will be notified by letter and will receive instructions for what steps they must take to access funding and begin implementing grant activities.

Applicants who are not funded will also receive letters via U.S. postal mail. Applicants who are not funded may request a debriefing. Applicants requesting to be debriefed must send a written request to: Iredia Hutchinson, Director, Grants Management Center, 501 School Street, SW., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20024. Please refer to the General Section of the SuperNOFA for additional information on debriefings.

B. Administrative and National Policy Requirements

1. Applicable Requirements. Grantees are subject to regulations and other requirements found in:

a. 24 CFR part 85 “Administrative Requirements for Grants and Cooperative Agreements to State, Local, and Federally Recognized Indian Tribal Governments”.

b. 24 CFR part 905 “The Public Housing Capital Fund Program”.

c. 24 CFR part 968 “Public Housing Modernization”.

d. OMB Circular A-87 “Cost Principles for State, Local, and Indian Tribal Governments”.

e. OMB Circular A-133 “Audits of States, Local Governments, and Non-Profit Organizations”.

2. Economic Opportunities for Low- and Very Low-Income Persons (Section 3). Section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968 applies to the Neighborhood Networks Program. For further information see the General Section of the SuperNOFA.

3. Executive Order 13202, Preservation of Open Competition and Government Neutrality Towards Government Contractors' Labor Relations on Federal and Federally Funded Construction Projects. For further information see the General Section of the SuperNOFA.

4. Fair Housing and Civil Rights Laws. Applicants and their subrecipients must comply with all Fair Housing and Civil Rights laws, statutes, regulations, and Executive Orders as enumerated in 24 CFR 5.105(a), as applicable. Please see the General Section of the SuperNOFA for more information.

5. Procurement of Recovered Materials. State agencies and agencies of a political subdivision of a state that are using assistance under a HUD program NOFA for procurement, and any person contracting with such an agency with respect to work performed under an assisted contract, must comply with the requirements of Section 6002 of the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

6. Requirements Applicable to All Programs. Applicants should refer to “Requirements and Procedures Applicable to All Programs” of the General Section of the SuperNOFA for other requirements to which they may be subject.

C. Reporting

1. Semi-Annual Performance Reports. Grantees shall submit semi-annual performance reports to the local HUD field office. These progress reports shall include financial reports (SF-269A) and a narrative describing milestones, business plan progress, and problems encountered and methods used to address these problems. HUD anticipates that some of the reporting of financial status and grant performance will be through electronic or Internet-based submissions. Grantees shall use quantifiable data to measure performance against goals and objectives outlined in their business plan. Applicants that receive awards from HUD should be prepared to report on additional measures that HUD may designate at time of award. Performance reports are due to the field office on July 30 and January 31 of each year. If reports are not received by the due date, grant funds will not be advanced until reports are received.

2. Final Report. All grantees shall submit a final report to their local field office, which will include a financial report (SF-269A) and a narrative evaluating overall performance against their business plan. Grantees shall use quantifiable data to measure performance against goals and objectives outlined in their business plan. The financial report shall contain a summary of all expenditures made from the beginning of the grant agreement to the end of the grant agreement and shall include any unexpended balances. The final narrative and financial report shall be due to the field office 90 days after the termination of the grant agreement.

3. Racial and Ethnic Data. HUD requires that funded recipients collect racial and ethnic beneficiary data. It has adopted the Office of Management and Budget's Standards for the Collection of Racial and Ethnic Data. In view of these requirements, applicants should use HUD-27061, the Racial and Ethnic Data Reporting Form (instructions are included), which can be found at http://www.HUDclips.org; a comparable form; or a comparable electronic data system for this purpose.

4. Logic Model. For each reporting period, as part of your required report to HUD, you must include a completed Logic Model (Form HUD-96010), which identifies output and outcome achievements.

VII. Agency Contact(s) Back to Top

For questions and technical assistance, applicants may call the Public and Indian Housing Information and Resource Center at 800-955-2232. For the hearing or speech impaired, please call the Federal Relay Service at 800-877-8339.

VIII. Other Information Back to Top

A. Code of Conduct

See the General Section of the SuperNOFA for more information.

B. Transfer of Funds

HUD does not have the discretion to transfer funds for the Neighborhood Networks category to or from any other grant program.

C. Paperwork Reduction Act

The information collection requirements contained in this document have been approved by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501-3520) and assigned OMB control number 2577-0229. In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act, HUD may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to, a collection of information unless the collection displays a currently valid OMB control number. Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average ten hours per annum per respondent for the application and grant administration. This includes the time for collecting, reviewing, and reporting the data for the application, semi-annual reports and final report. The information will be used for grantee selection and monitoring the administration of funds. Response to this request for information is required in order to receive the benefits to be derived.

D. Appendix of Forms

The forms specific to the Neighborhood Networks Program follow.

BILLING CODE 4210-32-P

Resident Service Delivery Models-Family, Resident Service Delivery Models-Elderly/Persons with Disabilities, and Homeownership Supportive Services Under the Resident Opportunity and Self-Sufficiency (ROSS) Program; Overview Information Back to Top

A. Federal Agency Name: Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Public and Indian Housing.

B. Funding Opportunity Title: Resident Service Delivery Models-Family, Resident Service Delivery Models-Elderly/Persons with Disabilities, and Homeownership Supportive Services under the Resident Opportunity and Self-Sufficiency (ROSS) Program.

C. Announcement Type: Initial announcement.

D. Funding Opportunity Number: The Federal Register number for this NOFA is: FR-4900-N-31. The OMB approval number is: 2577-0229.

E. Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number(s): Resident Opportunity and Self Sufficiency, 14.870.

F. Dates: Resident Service Delivery Models-Elderly/Persons with Disabilities: The application due date is July 1, 2004. Please see the General Section of the SuperNOFA for application submission, delivery, and timely receipt requirements.

Resident Service Delivery Models-Family: The application due date is July 16, 2004. Please see the General Section of the SuperNOFA for application submission, delivery, and timely receipt requirements.

Homeownership Supportive Services: The application due date is August 10, 2004. Please see the General Section of the SuperNOFA for application submission, delivery, and timely receipt requirements.

G. Optional, Additional Overview Content Information:

1. Purpose of Program: The purpose of the Public and Indian Housing Resident Opportunity and Self Sufficiency (ROSS) program is to provide grants to public housing agencies (PHAs), tribes/tribally designated housing entities (TDHEs), Resident Associations (RAs), and nonprofit organizations, including grassroots, faith-based and other community-based organizations for the delivery and coordination of supportive services and other activities designed to help public and Indian housing residents attain economic self-sufficiency and elderly residents and residents with disabilities continue to live independently.

2. Funding Available: A total of approximately $56.6 million is available for ROSS in Fiscal Year 2004. This includes $54.6 million in FY2004 funding and approximately $2 million in carryover funding. Of this amount, approximately $16 million is available for the Public Housing Family Self-Sufficiency program, which is announced in a separate NOFA under this SuperNOFA.

3. Award Amounts: Awards, depending on the grant category, unit count and type of grantee, will range from $125,000 to $1,000,000. Please see each program description for more specific information about funding amounts.

4. Eligible Applicants. Eligible applicants are PHAs; tribes/TDHEs; nonprofit organizations including grassroots, faith-based and other community-based organizations that have resident support or the support of tribes; RAs; resident councils (RCs); resident organizations (ROs); City-Wide Resident Organizations (CWROs); Intermediary Resident Organizations (IROs); Jurisdiction-Wide Resident Organizations; Regional Resident Organizations; Resident Management Corporations (RMCs); Site-Based Resident Organizations; Statewide Resident Organizations (SRO); and Tribal/TDHE resident groups. The term “resident association” or “RA” will be used to refer to all types of eligible resident organizations. Please see the section on “Definition of Terms” for a complete definition of each type of eligible resident organization.

Resident Associations are not eligible for the Homeownership Supportive Services program.

See each program for more specific eligibility information.

5. Cost Sharing/Match Requirement: At least 25 percent of the requested grant amount is required as a match. The match may be in cash and/or in-kind donations. The match is a threshold requirement.

6. Grant term. The grant term for each funding category is three years from the execution date of the grant agreement.

Grant program Total funding Eligible applicants Maximum grant amount
Resident Service Delivery Models—Family $16 million PHAs $250,000 for PHAs with 1-780 units. $350,000 for PHAs with 781-2,500 units. $500,000 for PHAs with 2,501-7,300 units. $1,000,000 for PHAs with more than 7,301 units.
Resident Associations $125,000.
Non-profit entities $125,000 per RA; Maximum award is $375,000.
Tribes/TDHEs $250,000 for Tribes with 1-780 units. $350,000 for Tribes with 781-2,500 units. $500,000 for Tribes with 2,501-7,300 units. $1,000,000 for Tribes with more than 7,301 units.
Resident Service Delivery Models—Elderly and Persons with Disabilities $11.4 million PHAs $200,000 for PHAs with 1-217 units. $300,000 for PHAs with 218-1,155 units. $400,000 for PHAs with over 1,156 units.
Resident Associations $125,000.
Non-profit entities $125,000 per RA; Maximum award is $375,000.
Tribes/TDHEs $200,000 for Tribes with 1-217 units. $300,000 for Tribes with 218-1,155 units. $400,000 for Tribes with over 1,156 units.
Homeownership Supportive Services $13.2 million PHAs $250,000 for PHAs with 1-780 units. $350,000 for PHAs with 781-2,500 units. $500,000 for PHAs with 2,501-7,300 units. $1,000,000 for PHAs with more than 7,301 units.
Non-profit entities $125,000 per RA; Maximum award is $375,000.
Tribes/TDHEs $250,000 for Tribes with 1-780 units. $350,000 for Tribes with 781-2,500 units. $500,000 for Tribes with 2,501-7,300 units. $1,000,000 for Tribes with more than 7,301 units.

Full Text of Announcement Back to Top

I. Funding Opportunity Description Back to Top

A. Resident Services Delivery Models-Family (RSDM-Family)

The purpose is to provide funding to assist PHAs, tribes/TDHEs, RAs, nonprofit organizations including grassroots, faith-based or other community-based organizations create programs which will help residents achieve economic self-sufficiency. Applicants must submit proposals that will: Provide job training; expand educational opportunities for residents; promote economic self-sufficiency; provide access to the Internet and computer technology, and meet other needs and interests of residents.

B. Resident Services Delivery Models-Elderly/Persons with Disabilities (RSDM-Elderly)

This category is intended to provide PHAs, Indian tribes/TDHEs, RAs, and nonprofit organizations with the resources to provide and coordinate supportive services that will help elderly and/or disabled Public and Indian Housing residents continue to live independently.

C. Homeownership Supportive Services (HSS)

The HSS category provides funds for PHAs, tribes/TDHEs, and qualified nonprofit organizations to deliver homeownership training, counseling and supportive services for residents of Public and Indian housing who are participating or have participated in self-sufficiency programs, such as ROSS, Public Housing Family Self-Sufficiency (FSS) or other Federal, State, or local self-sufficiency programs. HSS is designed to enhance other self-sufficiency efforts by providing public housing residents with the necessary preparation and supportive services they need in order to move from rental housing to homeownership. PHAs, tribes/TDHEs, and nonprofit organizations specializing in homeownership training and counseling are eligible to apply. Resident participants in any HSS funding activity cannot be public housing residents and section 8 voucher holders concurrently.

D. Definition of Terms

1. City-Wide Resident Organization consists of members from Resident Councils, Resident Management Corporations, and Resident Organizations who reside in public housing developments that are owned and operated by the same PHA within a city.

2. Community Facility means a non-dwelling structure that provides space for multiple supportive services for the benefit of public or Indian housing residents and others eligible for the services provided. Supportive services may include but are not limited to:

a. Job-training;

b. After-school activities for youth;

c. Neighborhood Networks (formerly Twenty/20 Education Communities (TECs), Campus of Learners activities);

d. English as a Second Language (ESL) classes; and

e. Child care.

3. Contract Administrator means an overall grant administrator or a financial management agent (or both) that oversees the implementation of the grant and/or the financial aspects of the grant. (See the “Program Requirements” and “Threshold Requirements” sections for more information.)

4. Elderly person means a person who is at least 62 years of age.

5. Jurisdiction-Wide Resident Organization means an incorporated nonprofit organization or association that meets the following requirements:

a. Most of its activities are conducted within the jurisdiction of a single housing authority;

b. There are no incorporated resident councils or resident management corporations within the jurisdiction of the single housing authority;

c. It has experience in providing start-up and capacity-building training to residents and resident organizations; and

d. Public housing residents representing unincorporated resident councils within the jurisdiction of the single housing authority must comprise a majority of the board of directors.

6. Tribally Designated Housing Entity (TDHE) is an entity authorized or established by one or more Indian tribe to act on behalf of each such tribe authorizing or establishing the housing entity.

7. Indian Tribe means any tribe, band, nation, or other organized group of a community of Indians, including any Alaska native village, regional, or village corporation as defined in or established pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, and that is recognized as eligible for the special programs and services provided by the United States to Indians because of their status as Indians pursuant to the Indian Self Determination and Education Act of 1975.

8. Intermediary Resident Organizations means jurisdiction-wide resident organizations, city-wide resident organizations, statewide resident organizations, regional resident organizations, and national resident organizations.

9. NAHASDA-assisted resident means a resident of a tribe (as defined above) who has been assisted by the Native American Housing Assistance and Self-Determination Act (NAHASDA) of 1996.

10. National Resident Organization (NRO) is an incorporated nonprofit organization or association for public housing that meets each of the following requirements:

a. It is national (i.e., conducts activities or provides services in at least two HUD areas or two states);

b. It has the capacity to provide start-up and capacity-building training to residents and resident organizations; and

c. Public housing residents representing different geographical locations in the country are members of the board of directors.

11. Nonprofit organization is an organization that is exempt from federal taxation. A nonprofit organization can be organized for the following purposes: charitable, religious, educational, scientific, or other similar purposes in the public interest. In order to qualify, an organization must be a corporation, community chest, fund, or foundation. An individual or partnership will not qualify. To obtain nonprofit status, qualified organizations must file an application with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and receive designation as such by the IRS. For more information, go to http://www.irs.gov. Applicants who are in the process of applying for nonprofit status, but have not yet received nonprofit designation from the IRS, will not be considered nonprofit organizations. All nonprofit applicants must submit their IRS determination letter to prove their 501(c)(3) status. Please see the section on “Threshold Requirements” for more information. Nonprofit applicants must also provide letters of support as described in the “Threshold Requirements” section.

12. National nonprofit organizations work on a national basis and have the capacity to mobilize resources on both a national and local level. All nonprofit applicants must submit their IRS determination letter to prove their 501(c)(3) status. National nonprofit applicants must also provide letters of support as outlined in the “Threshold Requirements” section.

13. Past Performance is a threshold requirement. Using Rating Factor 1, HUD's field offices will evaluate applicants for past performance to determine whether an applicant has the capacity to manage the grant for which they are applying. The area Office of Native American Programs (ONAP) will review past performance for tribal/TDHE submissions. Field offices will evaluate the past performance of contract administrators for applicants required to have a contract administrator.

14. Person with disabilities means a person who:

a. Has a condition defined as a disability in section 223 of the Social Security Act;

b. Has a developmental disability as defined in section 102 of the Developmental Disabilities Assistance Bill of Rights Act; or

c. Is determined to have a physical, mental, or emotional impairment which:

(1) Is expected to be of long-continued and indefinite duration;

(2) Substantially impedes his or her ability to live independently; and

(3) Is of such a nature that such ability could be improved by more suitable housing conditions.

The term “person with disabilities” does not exclude persons who have acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) or any conditions arising from the etiologic agent for AIDS. In addition, no individual shall be considered a person with disabilities, for purposes of eligibility for low-income housing, solely on the basis of any drug or alcohol dependence.

The definition provided above for persons with disabilities is the proper definition for determining program qualifications. However, the definition of a person with disabilities contained in section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and its implementing regulations must be used for purposes of reasonable accommodations.

15. Project Coordinator is a person who is responsible for coordinating the grantee's approved activities to ensure that grant goals and objectives are met. A qualified project coordinator is someone with at least two years of experience working on supportive services designed specifically for typically underserved populations. The project coordinator and grantees are responsible for ensuring that all federal requirements are followed.

16. Resident Association (RA) means any or all of the forms of resident organizations as they are defined elsewhere in this Definitions section and includes Resident Councils (RC), Resident Management Corporations (RMC), Regional Resident Organizations (RRO), Statewide Resident Organizations (SRO), Jurisdiction-Wide Resident Organizations, and National Resident Organizations (NRO). The NOFA will use “Resident Association” or “RA” to refer to all eligible types of resident organizations. See 24 CFR 964.115 for more information.

17. Regional Resident Organization (RRO) means an incorporated nonprofit organization or association for public housing that meets each of the following requirements:

a. The RRO is regional (i.e., not limited by HUD Areas);

b. The RRO has experience in providing start-up and capacity-building training to residents and resident organizations; and

c. Public housing residents representing different geographical locations in the region must comprise the majority of the board of directors.

18. Resident Management Corporation (RMC) means an entity that proposes to enter into, or enters into a contract to conduct one or more management activities of a PHA and meets the requirements of 24 CFR 964.120.

19. Resident Organization (RO) for tribal entities means an incorporated or unincorporated nonprofit tribal organization or association that meets each of the following criteria:

a. It shall consist of residents only, and only residents may vote;

b. If it represents residents in more than one development or in all of the developments of the tribal/TDHE community, it shall fairly represent residents from each development that it represents;

c. It shall adopt written procedures providing for the election of specific officers on a regular basis; and

d. It shall have democratically elected governing board. The voting membership of the board shall consist solely of the residents of the development or developments that the tribal RO represents.

20. Secretary means the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development.

21. Site-Based Resident Associations means resident councils or resident management corporations representing a specific public housing development.

22. Statewide Resident Organization (SRO) is an incorporated nonprofit organization or association for public housing that meets the following requirements:

a. The SRO is statewide;

b. The SRO has experience in providing start-up and capacity-building training to residents and resident organizations; and

c. Public housing residents representing different geographical locations in the state must comprise the majority of the Board of Directors.

23. Tribal/TDHE Resident Group means tribal/TDHE resident groups that are democratically elected groups such as IHA-wide resident groups, area-wide resident groups, single development groups, or resident management corporations (RMCs).

E. Regulations Governing the ROSS Grant

Resident Service Delivery Models-Family, Resident Service Delivery Models-Elderly/Persons with Disabilities, and Homeownership Supportive Services are governed by 24 CFR part 964.

II. Award Information Back to Top

A. Information for All Grant Categories and All Applicants

1. Grant Period: Three years. The grant period shall begin the day the grant agreement and the form HUD-1044, “Assistance Award/Amendment” are signed by both the grantee and HUD.

2. Grant Extensions. Requests to extend the grant term beyond the originally established grant term must be submitted in writing by the grantee to the local HUD field office or area ONAP. Such requests must be done prior to grant termination and with enough notice to give the field office or area ONAP a reasonable amount of time to fully evaluate the request. Requests must explain why the extension is necessary, what work remains to be completed, and what work and progress was accomplished to date.

3. Type of Award: Grant agreement.

4. Subcontracting: Subcontracting is permitted. Grantees must follow federal procurement regulations found in HUD regulations at 24 CFR 84.40-84.48 and 24 CFR 85.36.

B. Resident Services Delivery Models-Family

1. Total Funding: The Department expects to award $16 million under this category. Awards will be made as follows:

a. PHAs must use the number of occupied conventional family public housing units as of September 30, 2003, per their budget to determine the maximum grant amount they are eligible for in accordance with the categories listed below. PHAs should clearly indicate on the Fact Sheet the number of units under management.

Number of conventional units Maximum funding
1-780 units $250,000
781-2,500 units 350,000
2501-7,300 units 500,000
7,301 or more units 1,000,000

b. The maximum grant award is $125,000 for each RA.

c. Nonprofit organizations that have resident support or the support of tribes or RAs are limited to $125,000 for each RA. A nonprofit organization may submit a single application for no more than three different RAs from the same PHA for a maximum grant award of $375,000. Nonprofit organizations may submit more than one application provided they target residents of distinct PHAs or tribes/TDHEs. In cases where nonprofit applicants are not able to obtain support from RAs, they may alternatively obtain letters of support from PHAs, Resident Advisory Boards (RABs), local civic organizations, or units of local government.

Note:

All nonprofit applicants that do not include letters of support from RAs must include a letter of support from PHAs or tribes/TDHEs (please see Threshold Requirements for more information).

Funding for nonprofit applicants that do not receive letters of support from RAs will be determined as follows (support letters from PHAs must indicate the developments to be served by the nonprofit organization as well as the number of occupied conventional family public housing units in those developments):

Number of conventional units Maximum funding
1-2,500 units $125,000
2501-7,300 units 250,000
7,301 or more units 375,000

d. Tribes/TDHEs should use the number of units counted as Formula Current Assisted Stock for Fiscal Year 2003 as defined in 24 CFR 1000.316. Tribes/TDHEs are eligible for the same amounts as PHAs within each category in (a) above. Tribes that have not previously received funds from the Department under the U.S. Housing Act of 1937 should count housing units under management that are owned and operated by the Tribe and are identified in their housing inventory as of September 30, 2003, for family units. Tribes should clearly indicate the number of units under management on the Fact Sheet.

C. Resident Services Delivery Models-Elderly/Persons with Disabilities

1. Total Funding: The Department expects to award $11,400,000 under this category. Awards will be made as follows:

a. PHAs must use the number of occupied elderly and disabled conventional public housing units as of September 30, 2003, per their budget to determine the maximum grant amount they are eligible for in accordance with the categories listed below. PHAs should clearly indicate the number of units under management on the Fact Sheet.

Number of conventional units Maximum funding
1-217 units $200,000
218-1,155 units 300,000
1,156 or more units 400,000

b. The maximum grant award is $125,000 for each RA.

c. Nonprofit organizations that have resident support or the support of tribes or RAs are limited to $125,000 for each RA. A nonprofit organization may submit a single application for no more than three different RAs from the same PHA for a maximum grant award of $375,000. Nonprofit organizations may submit more than one application provided they target residents of distinct PHAs or tribes/TDHEs. In cases where nonprofit applicants are not able to obtain support from RAs, they may alternatively obtain letters of support from PHAs, Resident Advisory Boards (RABs), local civic organizations, or units of local government.

Note:

All nonprofit applicants that do not include letters of support from RAs must include a letter of support from PHAs or tribes/TDHEs (please see Threshold Requirements for more information).

Funding for nonprofit applicants that do not receive letters of support from RAs will be determined as follows (support letters from PHAs must indicate the developments to be served by the nonprofit organization as well as the number of occupied conventional elderly/disabled public housing units in those developments):

Number of conventional units Maximum funding
1-217 units $125,000
218-1,155 units 250,000
1,156 or more units 375,000

d. Tribes/TDHEs should use the number of units counted as Formula Current Assisted Stock for Fiscal Year 2003 as defined in 24 CFR 1000.316. Tribes/TDHEs are eligible for the same amounts as PHAs within each category in (a) above. Tribes that have not previously received funds from the Department under the 1937 Housing Act should count housing units under management that are owned and operated by the Tribe and are identified in their housing inventory as of September 30, 2003, for elderly/disabled units. Tribes should clearly indicate the number of units under management on the Fact Sheet.

D. Homeownership Supportive Services

1. Total Funding: The Department expects to award $13,200,000 under this category. Awards will be made as follows:

a. PHAs must use the number of occupied conventional family public housing units as of September 30, 2003, per their budget to determine the maximum grant amount they are eligible for in accordance with the categories listed below. PHAs should clearly indicate the number of units under management on the Fact Sheet.

Number of conventional unitsx Maximum funding
1-780 units $250,000
781-2,500 units 350,000
2,501-7,300 units 500,000
7,301 or more units 1,000,000

b. Nonprofit organizations that have resident support or the support of tribes or RAs are limited to $125,000 for each RA. A nonprofit organization may submit a single application for no more than three different RAs from the same PHA for a maximum grant award of $375,000. Nonprofit organizations may submit more than one application provided they target residents of distinct PHAs or tribes/TDHEs. In cases where nonprofit applicants are not able to obtain support from RAs, they may alternatively obtain letters of support from PHAs, Resident Advisory Boards (RABs), local civic organizations, or units of local government. NOTE: All nonprofit applicants that do not include letters of support from RAs must include a letter of support from PHAs or tribes/TDHEs (please see Threshold Requirements for more information).

Funding for nonprofit applicants that do not receive letters of support from RAs will be determined as follows (support letters from PHAs must indicate the developments to be served by the nonprofit as well as the number of occupied conventional family public housing units in those developments):

Number of conventional units Maximum funding
1-2,500 units $125,000
2,501-7,300 units 250,000
7,301 or more units 375,000

RAs are not eligible to apply for funding under the HSS category.

c. Tribes/TDHEs should use the number of units counted as Formula Current Assisted Stock for Fiscal Year 2003 as defined in 24 CFR 1000.316. Tribes/TDHEs are eligible for the same amounts as PHAs within each category in (a) above. Tribes that have not previously received funds from the Department under the U.S. Housing Act of 1937 should count housing units under management that are owned and operated by the Tribe and are identified in their housing inventory as of September 30, 2003, for family units. Tribes should clearly indicate the number of units under management on the Fact Sheet.

III. Eligibility Information Back to Top

A. Eligible Applicants

1. RSDM-Family: This funding category provides grants to PHAs, tribes/TDHEs, RAs, and nonprofit organizations supported by resident organizations or tribes/TDHEs.

2. RSDM-Elderly/Persons with Disabilities: This funding category provides grants to PHAs, tribes/TDHEs, RAs, and nonprofit organizations supported by resident organizations or tribes/TDHEs. PHAs that are recipients of the Elderly/Disabled renewal Service Coordinator grant are not eligible to apply for this ROSS funding category.

3. Homeownership Supportive Services: This funding category provides grants to PHAs, tribes/TDHEs and qualified nonprofit organizations that have resident support. Resident Associations are not eligible to apply for funding under this category.

B. Cost Sharing or Matching

Information for All Grant Categories and All Applicants: The match is a threshold requirement. Applicants who do not demonstrate the minimum 25 percent match will fail the threshold requirement and will not receive further consideration for funding. Please see the section below on threshold requirements for more information on what is required for the match.

C. Other

1. Eligible Activities: a. RSDM-Family: HUD is looking for applications that implement comprehensive programs within the three year grant term which will result in improved economic self-sufficiency for Public and Indian housing residents. HUD is looking for proposals that involve partnerships with organizations that will enhance grantees' ability to provide educational programs, housing counseling, including fair housing counseling, job training and other supportive services for residents. All applicants must complete a work plan (see sample, HUD-52764, provided in the Appendix “ROSS Forms”) covering the three-year grant term.

The eligible activities are listed in four categories, from basic to advanced: Life-Skills Training, Job Training, Job Search and Placement Assistance; Post Employment Follow-up; and finally, Activities to Support Career Advancement and Long-term Economic Self-Sufficiency. Applicants are not limited to choosing one category of activity, but rather should design their programs to address the specific needs of the population they are targeting. Applicants are encouraged to pull from all categories and activities listed. Funds may be used for the activities described below.

(1) Hiring of a qualified project coordinator to run the grant program. A qualified project coordinator must have at least two years of experience working on supportive services programs designed for typically underserved populations. The project coordinator should be hired for the entire three-year term of the grant. The project coordinator should be responsible for:

(a) Marketing the program to residents;

(b) Assessing participating residents' skills and job-readiness;

(c) Assessing participating residents' needs for supportive services, e.g., child care, transportation costs, etc.

(d) Assisting a tribe or TDHE to create a resident group to promote self-sufficiency efforts on the reservation;

(e) Designing and coordinating grant activities based on residents' needs and the local labor market; and

(f) Monitoring the progress of program participants and evaluating the overall success of the program. A portion of grant funds should be reserved to ensure that evaluations can be completed for all participants who received training through this program. For more information on how to measure performance, please see Rating Factor 5 in the “Application Review Information” section of this NOFA.

(2) Life-skills Training (for Youth and Adults). Applicants' proposals can cover the following types of activities:

(a) Credit. The importance of having good credit and how to maintain good credit.

(b) Banking and Money Management. How to open a bank account; balance a checkbook; create a weekly spending budget and establish contingency plans for child care and transportation, etc.

(c) Real Life Issues. Information on tax forms; voter registration; leases; car insurance; health insurance; long-term care insurance; etc.

(d) Literacy training and GED preparation.

(e) College preparatory courses and information.

(f) Goal setting.

(g) Mentoring

(h) Hiring residents to help with the implementation of this grant program. NOTE: Stipends and salaries serve different purposes. Resident salaries can only be used to hire residents to help grant program staff with the implementation of grant activities.

(3) Job Training, Job Search and Placement Assistance. Eligible activities include:

(a) Skills Assessment of participating residents.

(b) Applying for a job. How to complete employment forms; highlighting skills employers are looking for; researching job opportunities in the area; calculating net wages.

(c) Soft skills training including problem solving and other cognitive skills; oral and written communication skills; workplace norms (appropriate dress, punctuality, respectful communication, etc.), work ethic; interpersonal and teamwork skills.

(d) Creating job training and placement programs.

(e) Resume writing.

(f) Interviewing techniques.

(g) Employer linkage and job placement. Working with local employers and job placement providers to design and offer training that addresses local employers' needs, create a job placement program that refers trained residents to participating employers and other local area employers.

(h) Career advancement and planning programs. Such programs should be designed to:

(i) Help residents identify a career goal and a timeline for achieving it;

(ii) Provide strategies such as finding a strong professional mentor within an organization residents may be working for and focusing on the organization's priorities.

(iii) Reinforce welfare-to-work programs and focus efforts on increasing residents' earning capacity. Activities can include job counseling, helping residents secure better paying jobs or jobs in better work environments, preparing for work in a new job category, obtaining additional job skills and other job-related or educational training.

(iv) Working with local employers, to create opportunities that combine education and skills training with jobs. Strategies that promote work-based learning can offer the most effective method for giving new workers the tools they need to move on to a career ladder and achieve upward mobility.

(4) Post-employment follow-up. After placing residents in jobs, providing follow-up and ongoing support to newly hired residents can have a significant positive impact on long-term job retention.

(5) Activities to Support Career Advancement and Long-term Economic Self-Sufficiency.

(a) Individual Savings Accounts (ISAs). Applicants may create programs that encourage residents to save and contribute to match savings accounts such as Individual Development Accounts (IDAs). The programs should include financial counseling and education activities. ISAs may only be used for three purposes: (1) To purchase a first home that is existing or under construction when the purchase contract is signed; (2) to receive post-secondary education or training; or (3) to start a local business (other than acquiring, leasing, constructing, or rehabilitating real property in connection with the business). Applicants are encouraged to leverage RSDM funds by working with local financial organizations, which can also contribute to residents' ISAs. FSS escrow accounts may not be used as a match for RSDM-funded ISAs. Grantees shall consult the Internal Revenue Service regarding possible tax consequences of the ISAs to participating residents.

(b) Housing Counseling. This can include information to help residents move to market rate rental housing and/or “pre-purchase” homeownership counseling and training. This may include training on such subjects as credit and financial management; credit repair; housing search; how to finance the purchase of a home; fair housing; Individual Savings Accounts, Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act (RESPA); and home maintenance.

(6) Stipends. Stipends are an eligible use of grant funds. Stipends may be used for reasonable out-of-pocket costs. Stipends may be used to reimburse such things as local transportation to and from job training and job interviews, supplemental educational materials, and child care expenses. Stipends must be tied to residents' successful performance and regular attendance.

(7) Hiring of Residents. Grant funds may also be used to hire a resident(s) as program staff.

(8) Supportive Services.

(a) After school programs for school-age children to include tutoring, remedial training, educational programming using computers.

(b) Provision of information on the Earned Income Tax Credit Program, Food Stamps, Child Tax Credit Program, Medicaid, the State Child Health Insurance Program (S-CHIP), Student Loan Interest Deduction, tribal welfare programs, and other benefit programs that can assist individuals and families make a successful transition from welfare to work.

(c) Transportation costs as necessary to enable participating families to receive services or commute to training or employment.

(d) Child-care provision for ROSS-RSDM-Family program participants.

(e) Parenting courses.

(f) Nutrition courses.

(g) Healthcare information and services including referrals to mental health providers, alcohol and other drug abuse treatment programs.

(h) English as a second language (ESL) classes.

(i) Creating and maintaining linkages to local social service agencies, such as employment agencies, health departments, transportation agencies, economic/community development agencies, community colleges, recreational and cultural services, and other community organizations such as Boys & Girls Clubs, 4H-Clubs, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, etc.

b. RSDM-Elderly/Persons with Disabilities: HUD is looking for applications that implement comprehensive programs within the three-year grant term, which will result in improved living conditions for the elderly/persons with disabilities population. HUD is also looking for proposals that involve partnerships with organizations that will help grantees provide enhanced services to the elderly/persons with disabilities they will serve. All applicants must complete a work plan (see sample provided in the Appendix “ROSS Forms”) covering the three-year grant term.

Proposed grant activities should build on the foundation created by previous ROSS grants or other federal, state, and local efforts to assist this population. Eligible activities include the following:

(1) Hiring of a qualified project coordinator to run the grant program. A qualified project coordinator must have at least two years of experience working on supportive services programs designed for elderly and/or disabled people. The project coordinator will be responsible for:

(a) Assessing participating residents' needs for supportive services (e.g. Medicaid, Medicare, physician care, food stamps, rehabilitation services, veterans disability, state-funded programs such as nurse case management, housekeeping, Meals-on-Wheels; transportation etc.);

(b) Designing and coordinating grant activities based on residents' needs;

(c) Monitoring the progress of program participants and evaluating the overall success of the program. A portion of grant funds should be reserved to ensure that evaluations can be completed for all participants who received assistance through this program. For more information on how to measure performance, please see Rating Factor 5 in the “Application Review Information” section of this NOFA.

(2) Coordination and set up of meal services;

(3) Coordination and set-up of transportation services;

(4) Wellness programs including, health and nutrition programs, preventive health education, referral to rehabilitation services, and services for the disabled and other community resources;

(5) Personal emergency response;

(6) Congregate services—includes supportive services that are provided in a congregate setting at a conventional public housing development; and

(7) Case management.

c. Homeownership Supportive Services: HUD is looking for applications that implement comprehensive programs within the three year grant term which will result in increased rates of homeownership for residents of Public and Indian housing. Applicants should create linkages with HUD homeownership programs such as: the Housing Choice Voucher Homeownership Program, the PHA Homeownership Program also known as Section 32 (formerly the Section 5(h) Homeownership Program) and homeownership programs and resources offered by other organizations or state or local homeownership programs.

Tribes/TDHEs should create linkages with programs such as the Mutual Help Homeownership Opportunity Program, the Section 184 Program, and homeownership programs developed under the Indian Housing Block Grant Program such as mortgage assistance.

All applicants must complete a work plan (see sample provided in the Appendix “ROSS Forms”) covering the three-year grant term.

HUD is also looking for proposals that involve partnerships with organizations that will enhance the services grantees will offer. Applicants are strongly encouraged to partner with HUD-approved housing counseling agencies. For a list of HUD-approved housing counseling agencies, go to: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/hccprof14.cfm. Applicants' programs should build on the foundation created by previous ROSS grants, or other state and local self-sufficiency efforts in which their target population may have participated.

Under this funding category, applicants must develop homeownership training programs and supportive services based on needs assessments of the residents they intend to serve. NOTE: any applicant that proposes an ineligible activity will not be funded. Eligible activities include the following:

Eligible activities include, but are not limited to:

(1) Hiring of a qualified project coordinator to run the grant program. A qualified project coordinator must have at least two years of experience working on homeownership and supportive services programs designed for typically underserved populations. The project coordinator should be responsible for:

(a) Assessing participating residents' needs;

(b) Designing and coordinating grant activities based on residents' needs;

(c) Monitoring the progress of program participants and evaluating the overall success of the program. A portion of grant funds should be reserved to ensure that evaluations can be completed for all participants who received assistance through this program. For more information on how to measure performance, please see Rating Factor 5 in the “Application Review Information” section of this NOFA.

(2) Training to include:

(a) Asset building;

(b) Credit counseling and credit scoring;

(c) Financial literacy and management;

(d) Selecting a real estate broker;

(e) Choosing a lender;

(f) Appraisals;

(g) Home inspections;

(h) Avoiding delinquency and predatory lending;

(i) Foreclosure prevention;

(j) Home maintenance and financial management for first-time homeowners;

(k) Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act (RESPA); and

(l) Fair Housing Counseling.

(3) Individual Savings Accounts (ISAs). You may create programs that encourage residents to save and contribute to match savings accounts such as Individual Development Accounts (IDAs). ISAs may be used only for (a) escrow accounts, (b) down payment assistance and (c) closing costs to assist the resident to purchase an existing dwelling unit or a dwelling unit under construction. You are encouraged to leverage HSS funds by working with local financial organizations, which can also contribute to residents' ISAs. FSS escrow accounts may not be used as a match for HSS-funded ISAs. FSS residents are not eligible to participate in the ISA provision.

2. Threshold Requirements. The criteria below apply to all grant categories and all applicants unless otherwise indicated:

Applicants must respond to each threshold requirement clearly and thoroughly by following the instructions below. If your application fails one threshold requirement (regardless of the type of threshold) it will be considered a failed application and will not receive consideration for funding.

a. Match. All applicants are required to have in place a firmly committed 25 percent match in cash or in-kind donations as defined in this NOFA. Joint applicants must together have at least a 25 percent match. Applicants who do not demonstrate the minimum 25 percent match will fail this threshold requirement and will not receive further consideration for funding. If you are applying for more than one ROSS grant, you must use different sources of match donations for each grant application and you must indicate which additional ROSS grant(s) you are applying for by attaching an additional page to HUD budget form 424-CBW stating the sources and amounts of each of your match contributions for this application as well as any other HUD programs to which you are applying. Match donations must be firmly committed which means that the amount of match resources and their dedication to ROSS-funded activities must be explicit, in writing, and signed by a person authorized to make the commitment. Letters of commitment, memoranda of understanding (MOU), or tribal resolution must be on organization letterhead, and signed by a person authorized to make the stated commitment whether it be in cash or in-kind services. The letters of commitment/MOUs/tribal resolutions must indicate the total dollar value of the commitment and be dated within two months of the application deadline, and indicate how the commitment will relate to the proposed program. The commitment should be available at time of award. Applicants proposing to use their own, non-ROSS grant funds to meet the match requirement in whole or in part, must also include a letter of commitment indicating the type of match (cash or in-kind) and how the match will be used.

Leveraging in excess of the 25 percent of the grant amount will receive a higher point value.

(1) Volunteer time and services shall be computed by using the normal professional rate for the local area or the national minimum wage rate of $5.15 per hour (Note: applicants may not count their staff time toward the match);

(2) In order for HUD to determine the value of any donated material, equipment, staff time, building, or lease, your application must provide a letter from the organization making the donation stating the value of the contribution.

(3) Other resources/services that can be committed include: in-kind services such as contributions of administrative services provided to the applicant; funds from federal sources (not including ROSS funds) as allowed by statute, including for example Community Development Block Grant (CDBG); funds from any state or local government sources; and funds from private contributions. Applicants may also partner with other program funding recipients to coordinate the use of resources in the target area.

b. Past Performance. HUD's field offices will evaluate data provided by applicants as well as applicants' past performance to determine whether applicants have the capacity to manage the grant for which they are applying. The area Offices of Native American Programs (ONAP) will review past performance for tribal and TDHE submissions. Field offices will evaluate the contract administrators' past performance for applicants required to have a contract administrator. Using Rating Factor 1, the field office/area ONAP will evaluate applicants' past performance. Applicants should carefully review Rating Factor 1 to ensure their application addresses each of the criteria requested therein. If applicants fail to address what is requested in Rating Factor 1, their application will fail this threshold and will not receive further consideration.

c. Contract Administrator Partnership Agreement. All nonprofit applicants, all resident organizations, and PHAs that are troubled at time of application are required to submit a signed Contract Administrator Partnership Agreement. The agreement must be for the entire grant term. Grant awards shall be contingent upon having a signed partnership agreement included in your application. Applicants required to have a Contract Administrator Partnership Agreement that fail to submit one will fail this threshold requirement and will not receive further consideration for funding.

Troubled PHAs are not eligible to be contract administrators. Grant writers who assist applicants prepare their ROSS applications are also ineligible to be contract administrators. For more information on contract administrators, see the section “Program Requirements.”

d. Letters of Support for Nonprofit Applicants. All nonprofit applicants must include letters of support from resident associations (RAs), Resident Advisory Boards (RABs), local civic organizations, or units of local government. In the event that RAs are inactive, or that applicants submit letters of support from other organizations such as RABs, nonprofit applicants must also submit letters from PHAs indicating support for their application. All letters of support must be signed by an authorized representative of the supporting organization and dated within two months of the application deadline.

Nonprofit applicants that do receive support from resident associations must submit Form HUD-52754 “List of Resident Associations Supporting Nonprofit Applicants.” Submitting this form is not applicable where RAs are inactive or where applicants do not submit letters of support from RAs.

In cases where nonprofit organizations are applying to serve tribes/TDHEs, nonprofit applicants must submit letters of support from tribes/TDHEs. Nonprofit organizations must also use Form HUD-52754 to list which tribes/TDHEs support their application.

Letters of support from RAs must describe to what extent they are familiar with the nonprofit applicant and indicate their support and understanding of the nonprofit organization's proposal/application. Letters from RAs must include contact information and the name and title of the person authorized to sign for the organization and should, whenever possible, be on RA letterhead.

Letters of support from RABs must describe to what extent the RAB is familiar with the nonprofit applicant and indicate its support and understanding of the nonprofit organization's proposal/application. Letters from RABs must include contact information and the name and title of the person authorized to sign for the organization, and should be on RAB or PHA letterhead.

Letters of support from civic organizations or units of local government must describe to what extent they are familiar with the nonprofit applicant and which programs the nonprofit applicant has operated or managed in the community that are similar to the applicant's proposal. Such letters of support must include contact information and the name and title of the person authorized to sign for the organization. The letter should be on organization letterhead.

All nonprofit applicants that do not provide letters of support from resident associations must provide letters of support from PHAs or tribes/TDHEs with jurisdiction over the developments the applicant proposes to serve. Letters from PHAs or tribes/TDHEs must describe the extent to which the nonprofit applicant is familiar with the needs of the community to be served, which programs the nonprofit applicant has operated or managed in the community that are similar to the applicant's proposal, and whether the nonprofit organization has the capacity to implement its proposed program. Letters from PHAs or tribes/TDHEs must also list the names of the developments to be served, the number of occupied conventional family or elderly/disabled public housing units (depending on the grant category) in those developments, certify that the units are conventional public housing, and identify the ROSS grant category to which the nonprofit organization is applying. PHA or tribe/TDHE letters of support must be signed by the Executive Director, tribal leader, or authorized designee and must be on PHA or tribe/TDHE letterhead.

Applications from nonprofit organizations, which do not submit the information requested in this section will fail this threshold requirement and will not be considered for funding.

e. Nonprofit status. All nonprofit applicants must submit their IRS determination letter to prove their 501(c)(3) status. Applicants that fail to submit this letter will fail this threshold requirement and will not be considered for funding.

f. Minimum Score for All Fundable Applications. Applications that pass all threshold requirements and go through the ranking and rating process, must receive a minimum score of 75 in order to be considered for funding.

g. Ineligible Activities. Any application that proposes an ineligible activity will be disqualified and not considered for funding.

h. Funding Requests in Excess of Maximum Grant Amount. Applicants that request funding in excess of the maximum grant amount which they are eligible to receive will not receive funding consideration.

i. PHA applicants to the Homeownership Supportive Services program. PHA applicants to the Homeownership Supportive Services program that administer a Homeownership Voucher Program will be required to provide 10 Homeownership Vouchers per year to eligible families who successfully complete training under the Homeownership Supportive Services grant program. Those PHAs which administer a Housing Choice Voucher program but have not elected to provide assistance under the Homeownership Voucher option and receive funding under this category, will be required to implement the Homeownership Voucher Program and make 10 Homeownership Vouchers available on an annual basis to eligible families who successfully complete training under this ROSS activity. PHA applicants as described in this section must provide a letter certifying that they will comply with this requirement.

j. Tribal/TDHE applicants. Tribal/TDHE applicants to the HSS program must have a Low-income Homeownership Program outlined in their current Indian Housing Plan. Tribes/TDHEs will also be required to provide homeownership assistance to a minimum of 10 eligible families as described above.

k. The Dunn and Bradstreet Universal Numbering System (DUNS) Number Requirement. Refer to the General Section of the SuperNOFA for information regarding the DUNS requirement. You will need to obtain a DUNS number to receive an award from HUD. This threshold requirement is curable.

3. Program Requirements:

a. Program Evaluations. A portion of grant funds should be reserved to ensure that evaluations can be completed for all participants who received training through this program. Applicants may, for example, propose to reserve one percent of grant funds for every 10 students they train for the purpose of evaluating students' success in the program.

b. Contract Administrator. The contract administrator must assure that the financial management system and procurement procedures that will be in place during the grant term will fully comply with either 24 CFR part 84 or part 85, as appropriate. CAs are expressly forbidden from accessing HUD's Line of Credit Control System (LOCCS) and submitting vouchers on behalf of grantees. Contract administrators must also assist PHAs meet HUD's reporting requirements, see Section VI.C. “Reporting” for more information. Contract administrators may be: Local housing agencies; community-based organizations such as community development corporations (CDCs), churches, temples, synagogues, mosques; nonprofit organizations; state/regional associations and organizations. Troubled PHAs are not eligible to be contract administrators. Grant writers who assist applicants prepare their applications are also ineligible to be contract administrators. Organizations that the applicant proposes to use as the contract administrator must not violate or be in violation of other conflicts of interest as defined in 24 CFR part 84 and 24 CFR part 85.

4. Number of Applications Permitted. Except as otherwise noted, the criteria below apply to all grant categories and all applicants.

a. General. Applicants including PHAs, tribes/TDHEs, RAs, and nonprofit organizations that have support from the resident associations they propose to serve or the support of tribes/TDHEs may submit one application for each ROSS funding category, however applicants must submit separate applications for each funding category. Nonprofit organizations may submit more than one application per funding category provided that they will be serving residents of distinct PHAs or Tribes/TDHEs.

b. More than one application per development. Applications from PHAs, tribes/TDHEs, RAs, and nonprofit organizations targeting the same public housing development/population will not all be funded. HUD suggests that in these cases, applicants work together to submit one application. Otherwise, the highest scoring application will be funded.

c. Joint applications. Two or more applicants may join together to submit a joint application for proposed grant activities. Joint applications must designate a lead applicant. Both lead and non-lead applicants are subject to threshold requirements. Joint applications may include PHAs, RAs, Tribes/TDHEs, and nonprofit organizations on behalf of resident organizations. Joint applications involving nonprofit organizations must also provide evidence of resident support or support from local civic organizations or from units of local government. PHAs, tribes/TDHEs, and resident organizations that are part of a joint application may not also submit separate applications as sole applicants under this NOFA.

Note:

The lead applicant will determine the maximum funding amount the applicants are eligible to receive.

5. Eligible Participants: All program participants must be residents of conventional public housing or NAHASDA-assisted housing. Participants in the Public Housing Family Self-Sufficiency (FSS) program (non-Housing Choice Voucher FSS Program) are also eligible to participate in activities funded under ROSS.

6. Eligible Developments: Only conventional Public and Indian housing developments may be served by ROSS grant funds. Other housing/developments, including, but not limited to private housing, federally insured housing, federally subsidized or assisted (i.e., assisted under Section 8, Section 202, Section 811, Section 236), and others are not eligible to participate in ROSS.

7. Energy Star. HUD has adopted a wide-ranging energy action plan for improving energy efficiency in all program areas. As a first step toward implementing the energy plan, HUD, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Energy (DoE) have signed a joint partnership to promote energy efficiency in HUD's affordable housing efforts and programs. The purpose of the Energy Star partnership is to promote energy efficiency of the affordable housing stock, but also to help protect the environment. Applicants constructing, rehabilitating, or maintaining housing or community facilities are encouraged to promote energy efficiency in design and operations. They are urged especially to purchase and use Energy Star labeled products. Applicants providing housing assistance or counseling services are encouraged to promote Energy Star building by homebuyers and renters. Program activities can include developing Energy Star promotional and information materials, outreach to low- and moderate-income renters and buyers on the benefits and savings when using Energy Star products and appliances, and promoting the designation of community buildings and homes as Energy Star compliant. For further information about Energy Star, see http://www.energystar.gov or call 888-STAR-YES (888-782-7937) or for the hearing-impaired, 888-588-9920 (TTY).

IV. Application and Submission Information Back to Top

A. Addresses to Request Application Package

There is no application kit this year. All forms and necessary information are contained within this NOFA. Please refer to the General Section of the SuperNOFA for information on how to obtain hard copies of this NOFA, or visit http://www.hud.gov for this information.

B. Content and Form of Application Submission

1. Application Format Information for All Grant Categories and All Applicants: Before preparing an application to any ROSS funding program, applicants should carefully review the program description, ineligible activities, program and threshold requirements, and the General Section of the SuperNOFA. Applicants should also review each rating factor found in the “Application Review Information” section before writing a narrative response. Applicants' narratives should be as descriptive as possible, ensuring that every requested item is addressed. Applicants should make sure to include all requested information, according to the instructions found in this NOFA and where applicable, in the General Section of the SuperNOFA. This will help ensure a fair and accurate review of your application.

2. Content and Format for Submission: In order to be funded, applicants must propose programs which meet all the requirements and objectives of the ROSS program to which they are applying to, as described in this NOFA. Applicants are reminded that any application proposing ineligible activities will not be funded. Finally, applicants must submit their applications according to the format provided in the “Format” section below.

a. Content of Application: Applicants must write narrative responses to each of the rating factors, which follow this section. Applicants will be evaluated on whether their responses demonstrate that they have the necessary capacity to successfully manage this grant program. Applicants should ensure that their narratives are written clearly and concisely so that HUD reviewers, who may not be familiar with the ROSS program, may fully understand your proposal.

b. Format of Application: (1) Applications may not exceed 35 narrative pages. Narrative pages must be typed, double-spaced, numbered, use Times New Roman font style, and font size 12. Applications should be submitted in a three-ring binder with materials organized behind tabs according to the outline provided below. Supporting documentation, required forms, and certificates will not be counted toward the 35 narrative page limit. However, applicants should make every effort to submit only what is necessary in terms of supporting documentation.

(2) Format for submission of SuperNOFA forms, ROSS forms, and narrative responses.

TAB 1: Required Forms from the General Section of the SuperNOFA and other ROSS forms:

1. Application for Federal Assistance (SF-424);

2. Supplement to SF-424—Survey on Ensuring Equal Opportunity for Applicants (SF-23004);

3. Questionnaire for HUD's Initiative on Removal of Regulatory Barriers (HUD-27300);

4. Fact Sheet (HUD-52751);

5. Applicant Assurances and Certifications (HUD-424B);

6. Grant Application Detailed Budget (HUD-424-CB);

7. Grant Application Detailed Budget Worksheet (HUD-424-CBW);

8. Applicant/Recipient Disclosure/Update Report (HUD-2880);

9. Certification of Consistency with RC/EZ/EC Strategic Plan (HUD-2990) if applicable;

10. Certification of Consistency with the Consolidated Plan (HUD-2991) if applicable;

11. Certification of Consistency with the Indian Housing Plan if applicable (HUD-52752);

12. Certification of Resident Council Board of Election (not required for tribes/nonprofit organizations working on behalf of tribes) (HUD-52753);

13. Disclosure of Lobbying Activities (HUD-SF-LLL)—if applicable;

14. Disclosure of Lobbying Activities Continuation Sheet (HUD-SF-LLL-A)—if applicable;

15. Acknowledgment of Application Receipt (HUD-2993); and,

16. Client Comments and Suggestions (HUD-2994). (Optional)

TAB 2: Threshold Requirements:

1. Letters from Partners attesting to match;

2. Letter from Applicant's organization attesting to match (if applicant is contributing to match);

3. Letters of Support from Resident Associations/ PHAs/tribes/TDHEs/ Resident Advisory Boards/local civic organizations and/or units of local government (Threshold requirement for all nonprofit applicants);

4. Chart of Resident Associations Participating (required for nonprofit applicants but not applicable to applications from tribes/TDHEs.) (HUD-52754);

5. IRS nonprofit determination letter proving 501(c)(3) status (Threshold requirement for all nonprofit applicants); and

6. Contract Administrator Partnership Agreement (required for nonprofit organizations, resident associations, and troubled PHAs) (HUD-52755).

TAB 3: Narrative for Rating Factor 1 and ROSS Program Forms:

1. Narrative

2. Chart A: Program Staffing (HUD-52756)

3.Chart B: Applicant/Administrator Track Record (HUD-52757)

4. Resumes/Position Descriptions

TAB 4: Narrative for Rating Factor 2.

TAB 5: Rating Factor 3:

1. Narrative

2. Work plan (see sample) (HUD-52764)

TAB 6: Narrative for Rating Factor 4.

TAB 7: Narrative for Rating Factor 5 and ROSS Program Forms:

1. Narrative

2. Logic Model (HUD-96010)

3. Sample Performance measures/outcomes are attached for applicants' information

C. Submission Dates and Times

1. Due Dates: Resident Service Delivery Models-Elderly/Persons with Disabilities: The application due date is July 1, 2004. Please see the General Section of the SuperNOFA for application submission, delivery, and timely receipt requirements.

Resident Service Delivery Models-Family: The application due date is July 16, 2004. Please see the General Section of the SuperNOFA for application submission, delivery, and timely receipt requirements.

Homeownership Supportive Services: The application due date is August 10, 2004. Please see the General Section of the SuperNOFA for application submission, delivery, and timely receipt requirements.

2. Proof of Timely Submission. Please see the General Section of the SuperNOFA for more information about how to mail in your application to HUD and how HUD will determine whether your application is received by the deadline. Applicants that fail to meet the deadline for application receipt will not receive funding consideration.

D. Intergovernmental Review

Not applicable.

E. Funding Restrictions

1. Reimbursement for Grant Application Costs: Applicants who receive an award under any ROSS funding category are prohibited from using ROSS grant funds to reimburse any costs incurred in conjunction with preparation of their ROSS grant application.

2. Covered Salaries: Applicable to all grant categories and all applicants:

a. Project Coordinator: All applicants may propose to hire a qualified project coordinator to run the grant program. The ROSS program will fund up to $63,000 in combined annual salary and fringe benefits for a full-time project coordinator. The project coordinator's salary and fringe benefits may not exceed 30 percent of the total grant amount. For audit purposes, applicants must have documentation on file demonstrating that the salary of the project coordinator is comparable to similar professions in their local area.

b. Resident Salaries. Only the RSDM-Family category permits grantees to use grant funds for this purpose. No more than five percent of RSDM-Family funds may be used to pay for resident salaries.

c. Types of Salaries. ROSS funds may only be used for the types of salaries described in this section according to the restrictions described herein. ROSS funds may not be used to pay for salaries of any other kind.

3. Administrative Costs. Administrative costs may include, but are not limited to, purchase of furniture, office equipment and supplies, local travel, and utilities. Administrative costs may not be used to pay for salaries of any kind. Nonprofit organizations only may use administrative funds to pay for rental of space. Administrative costs must not exceed 10 percent of the total grant amount requested from HUD. Administrative costs must adhere to OMB Circular A-87 or A-122 as appropriate. Please use HUD-424-CBW to itemize your administrative costs.

4. Individual Savings Accounts (ISAs). ROSS RSDM-Family and Homeownership Supportive Services funds can be used as matching funds for ISAs but no more than 20 percent of total grant funds may be used for this purpose.

5. Stipends. This applies to RSDM-Family only. No more than $200 of the grant award may be used per participant per month for stipends for active trainees and program participants. Stipends may only be used to reimburse reasonable out-of-pocket expenses related to participation in training and other program-related activities. Receipts for such expenses must be provided by the resident in order to obtain reimbursement. Stipends are not considered an administrative expense and therefore are not subject to the 10 percent limitation on administrative costs.

6. Ineligible Activities/Costs. Grant funds may not be used for ineligible activities:

a. Payment of wages and/or salaries to participants for receiving supportive services and/or training programs;

b. Purchase, lease, or rental of land;

c. New construction, costs for construction materials;

d. Rehabilitation or physical improvements;

e. Purchase, lease, or rental of vehicles;

f. Entertainment costs;

g. Purchasing food;

h. Elderly/Disabled Service Coordinator salary and fringe benefits;

i. Payment of wages and/or salaries to doctors, nurses or other staff (including health aids or companions) in relation to medical services provided to residents;

j. Purchase of non-prescription or prescription medications;

k. Stipends (Stipends are only allowed under RSDM-Family)

l. Down payment assistance (Note: Participants may use their ISAs under the RSDM-Family and Homeownership Supportive Services program for this purpose);

m. Revolving loan funds;

n. Costs, which exceed limits, identified in the NOFA for the following: Project Coordinator, resident salaries, ISAs, stipends, and administrative expenses; and

o. Cost of application preparation.

7. Other Budgetary Restrictions. Applicable to all grant categories and all applicants: Some long distance travel may be necessary during the term of the grant in order for professional grant staff to attend HUD-sponsored training conferences for ROSS grantees. Long distance travel costs for grant program staff may not exceed $5,000 for the life of the grant and must receive prior approval from the grantee's local HUD field office or area ONAP.

F. Other Submission Requirements

1. Mailing Applications. Applicants to the ROSS program should send their applications to: HUD Grants Management Center, Mail Stop: Insert Name of ROSS Funding Category, 2001 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 703, Arlington, VA 22202. Please see the General Section of the SuperNOFA for detailed mailing and delivery instructions.

In the case of tribes and TDHEs, please submit your original completed application to: Denver Program Office of Native American Programs (DPONAP), 1999 Broadway, Suite 3390, Denver, CO 80202, by mail using the United States Postal Service (USPS) or it may be delivered only via the following four carrier services: United Parcel Service (UPS), FedEx, DHL, or Falcon Carrier.

2. Number of Copies. Applications must be submitted in triplicate (one original and two identical copies). The original and one identical copy must be sent to the Grants Management Center by the deadline. The other identical copy must be submitted to your local HUD field office by the deadline. For tribal and TDHE applicants, the original and one copy must be sent to the Denver Program Office of Native American Programs (DPONAP), the other identical copy should be sent to the GMC by the deadline. Copies of applications from tribes/TDHEs should not be sent to the Area ONAP.

V. Application Review Information Back to Top

A. Criteria

1. Factors for Award Used to Evaluate and Rate Applications to the ROSS program: The factors for rating and ranking applicants and maximum points for each factor are provided below. The maximum number of points available for this program is 102. This includes two RC/EZ/EC bonus points. The SuperNOFA contains a certification that must be completed in order for the applicant to be considered for RC/EZ/EC bonus points. A listing of federally designated RCs, EZs, ECs, and EECs is included as an appendix to the General Section of the SuperNOFA and is also available from the NOFA Information Center, and the Grants.gov Web site, http://www.grants.gov. The agency certifying to RC/EZ/EC status must be listed in the appendix of the SuperNOFA or on the http://www.grants.gov Web site.

Note:

Applicants should carefully review each rating factor before writing a response. Applicants' narratives should be as descriptive as possible, ensuring that every requested item is addressed. Applicants should make sure their narratives thoroughly address the Rating Factors below. Applicants should include all requested information, according to the instructions found in this NOFA. This will help ensure a fair and accurate application review.

a. Rating Factor 1: Capacity of the Applicant and Relevant Organizational Staff (20 Points)

This factor addresses whether the applicant has the organizational resources necessary to successfully implement the proposed activities within the grant period. In rating this factor HUD will consider the extent to which the proposal demonstrates that the applicant will have qualified and experienced staff dedicated to administering the program.

(1) Proposed Program Staffing (7 Points).

(a) Staff Experience (4 Points). The knowledge and experience of the proposed project coordinator, staff, and partners in planning and managing programs for which funding is being requested. Experience will be judged in terms of recent, relevant and successful experience of proposed staff to undertake eligible program activities. In rating this factor, HUD will consider experience within the last 5 years to be recent; experience pertaining to the specific activities being proposed to be relevant; and experience producing specific accomplishments to be successful. The more recent the experience and the more experience proposed staff members who work on the project have in successfully conducting and completing similar activities, the greater the number of points applicants will receive for this rating factor. The following information should be provided in order to provide HUD an understanding of proposed staff's experience and capacity:

(i) The number of staff years (one staff year = 2080 hours) to be allocated to the proposed program by each employee or expert as well as each of their roles in the program;

(ii) The staff's relevant educational background and/or work experience; and

(iii) Relevant and successful experience running programs whose activities are similar to the eligible program activities described in the grant category to which you are applying.

(b) Organizational Capacity (3 Points). Applicants will be evaluated based on whether they have, or their partners have sufficient qualified personnel to deliver the proposed activities in a timely and effective fashion. In order to enhance or supplement capacity, applicants should provide evidence of partnerships with nonprofit organizations or other organizations that have experience providing supportive services to typically underserved populations. Applicants' narrative must describe their ability to immediately begin the proposed work program. Attach resumes and position descriptions (where staff is not yet hired) for all key personnel. (Resumes/position descriptions do not count toward the 35-page limit.)

(2) Past Performance of Applicant/Contract Administrator (6 Points).

Applicants' past experience may include, but is not limited to, running and managing programs aimed at:

RSDM-Family: assisting residents of low-income housing achieve economic self-sufficiency;

RSDM-Elderly: assisting elderly/persons with disabilities who reside in low-income housing to live independently;

Homeownership: assisting residents of low-income housing achieve economic self-sufficiency and homeownership.

Applicants' narrative must indicate past grants they received and managed, the grant amounts, and grant terms (years) of the grants, which they are counting toward past experience.

Applicants' narrative must describe how they (or their Contract Administrator) successfully implemented past grant programs designed to:

RSDM-Family—promote resident self-sufficiency, moving from welfare to work, and/or helping residents move to market rate rental housing;

RSDM-Elderly—assist elderly/persons with disabilities meet their daily living needs and enhance their access to needed services so they can continue to reside comfortably and productively in their current living environment;

Homeownership—promote moving from subsidized housing to homeownership. Applicants will be evaluated according to the following criteria:

(a) Achievement of specific measurable outcomes and objectives in terms of benefits gained by participating residents. Applicants should describe results their programs have obtained, such as:

RSDM-Family: reduced welfare dependency, higher incomes, higher rates of employment, increased savings, moving from subsidized housing to market rate rental housing;

RSDM-Elderly: less emergency care, improved health conditions of assisted population, access to greater number of social services;

Homeownership: number of families in homeownership counseling pipeline, rates of homeownership achieved through training programs.

(b) Description of success in attracting and keeping residents involved in past grant-funded training programs. HUD wants to see that applicants' grant-funded programs benefited a significant number of residents;

(c) Description of timely expenditure of program funding throughout the term of past grants. Timely means regular drawdowns throughout the life of the grant, i.e., quarterly drawdowns, with all funds expended by the end of the grant term;

(d) Description of Past Leveraging. Applicants must describe how they have leveraged funding or in-kind services beyond amounts which were originally proposed for past projects;

(3) Program Administration and Fiscal Management. (7 Points).

(a) Program Administration and Accountability. (4 Points) Applicants should describe how they will manage the program; how HUD can be sure that there is program accountability; and provide a description of proposed staff's roles and responsibilities. Applicants should also describe how grant staff and partners shall report to the project coordinator and other senior staff.

(b) Fiscal Management. (3 Points) In rating this factor, applicants' skills and experience in fiscal management will be evaluated. If applicants have had any audit or material weakness findings in the past five years, they will be evaluated on how well they have addressed them. Applicants must provide the following:

(i) A complete description of their fiscal management structure, including fiscal controls currently in place including those of a Contract Administrator for applicants required to have a Contract Administrator, (i.e., troubled PHAs, resident associations, and nonprofit applicants);

(ii) Applicants must list any audit findings in the past five years (HUD Inspector General, management review, fiscal, etc.), material weaknesses, and what has been done to address them;

(iii) For applicants who are required to have a Contract Administrator, describe the skills and experience the Contract Administrator has in managing federal funds.

b. Rating Factor 2: Need/Extent of the Problem (20 Points)

This factor addresses the extent to which there is a need for funding the proposed program. In responding to this factor, applicants will be evaluated on the extent to which they describe and document the level of need for their proposed activities and the urgency for meeting the need.

Applicants should use statistics and analyses contained in data source(s) that are sound and reliable. Data that describes socioeconomic conditions at the local level can be found by going to the following Web sites: http://www.bls.gov (Bureau of Labor Statistics) or http://www.census.gov (U.S. Census). Other types of sources include socioeconomic studies or reports conducted by academic, State, and local organizations. To the extent possible, the data applicants use should be specific to the area where the proposed activities will be carried out. Applicants should document needs as they apply to the area where activities will be targeted, and not the entire region or State.

In responding to this factor, applicants must include:

(1) Socioeconomic Profile (5 points). A thorough socioeconomic profile of the eligible residents to be served by the program, including education levels, income levels, the number of single-parent families, economic statistics for the local area, etc.

(2) Local Training Programs Information (For RSDM-Family and Homeownership Applicants only) (5 points). Information on training programs currently available and easily accessible to residents either through the PHA, tribe/TDHE, or other local or state community organizations.

(3) Local Social Services Information (For RSDM-Elderly Applicants only) (5 points). Information on social service programs currently available and easily accessible to residents either through the PHA, tribe/TDHE, or other local or State community organizations.

(4) Demonstrated Link Between Proposed Activities and Local Need (5 points). Applicants' narrative must demonstrate a clear relationship between proposed activities, community needs and the purpose of the program funding in order for points to be awarded for this factor.

c. Rating Factor 3: Soundness of Approach (30 Points)

This factor addresses both the quality and cost-effectiveness of applicants' proposed work plan. The work plan must indicate a clear relationship between proposed activities, the targeted population's needs, and the purpose of the program funding. Applicants' activities must address HUD's policy priorities outlined in this Rating Factor.

In rating this factor HUD will consider:

(1) Quality of the Work Plan (18 points). This factor evaluates both the applicant's work plan and budget, which will be evaluated based on the following criteria:

(a) Specific Services and/or Activities (8 points). Applicants' narrative must describe the specific services, course curriculum, and activities they plan to offer and who will be responsible for each. In addition to the narrative, applicants must also provide a work plan, which must list the specific services, activities, and outcomes they expect. The work plan must show a logical order of activities and progress and must tie to the outcomes and outputs applicants identify in the Logic Model (see Rating Factor 5). Please see a sample work plan in the Appendix. Applicants' narrative must explain how their proposed activities will:

(i) Involve community partners in the delivery of services (4 points);

(ii) Offer comprehensive services versus a small range of services geared toward achieving the following (2 points):

RSDM-Family: enhancing economic opportunities for residents;

RSDM-Elderly: enhancing residents' quality of life;

Homeownership: enhancing homeownership opportunities for residents; and

(iii) Link to other ROSS-funded self-sufficiency programs (2 points).

(b) Feasibility and Demonstrable Benefits (4 points). This factor examines whether applicants' work plan is logical, feasible and likely to achieve its stated purpose during the term of the grant. HUD's desire is to fund applications that will quickly produce demonstrable results and advance the purposes of the ROSS program.

(i) Timeliness. This subfactor evaluates whether applicants' work plan demonstrates that their project is ready to be implemented shortly after grant award, but not to exceed three months following the execution of the grant agreement. The work plan must indicate timeframes and deadlines for accomplishing major activities.

(ii) Description of the problem and solution. The work plan will be evaluated based on how well applicants' proposed activities address the needs described in Rating Factor 2.

(c) Budget Appropriateness/Efficient Use of Grant. (6 Points) The score in this factor will be based on the following:

(i) Justification of expenses. Applicants will be evaluated based on whether their expenses are reasonable and thoroughly explained, and support the objectives of their proposal.

(ii) Budget Efficiency. Applicants will be evaluated based on whether their application requests funds commensurate with the level of effort necessary to accomplish their goals and anticipated results.

(2) Addressing HUD's Policy Priorities (12 points). HUD wants to improve the quality of life for those living in distressed communities. HUD's grant programs are a vehicle through which long-term, positive change can be achieved at the community level. Applicants' narrative and work plan will be evaluated based on how well they meet the following HUD policy priorities:

(a) Improving the Quality of Life in Our Nation's Communities (For RSDM-Family and RSDM-Elderly Applicants only) (5 points). In order to receive points in this category, applicants' narrative and work plan must indicate the types of activities, service, and training programs applicants will offer which can help residents successfully transition from welfare to work and earn higher wages, or for elderly/disabled residents, to continue to live independently.

Providing Increased Homeownership and Rental Opportunities for Low- and Moderate-Income Persons, Persons with Disabilities, the Elderly, Minorities, and Families with Limited English Proficiency (For Homeownership Applicants only) (5 points). In order to receive points in this category, applicants' narrative and work plan must indicate the types of activities and training programs they will offer which can help residents successfully transition from subsidized housing to market-rate rental housing or homeownership.

(b) Providing Full and Equal Access to Grassroots Faith-Based and Other Community-Based Organizations in HUD Program Implementation (For all applicants) (5 points). HUD encourages applicants to partner with grassroots organizations, e.g., civic organizations, grassroots faith-based and other community-based organizations that are not usually effectively utilized. These grassroots organizations have a strong history of providing vital community services such as developing first-time homeownership programs, creating economic development programs, providing job training and other supportive services. In order to receive points under this factor, applicants' narrative and work plan must describe how applicants will work with these organizations and what types of services they will provide.

(c) Policy Priority for Increasing the Supply of Affordable Housing Through the Removal of Regulatory Barriers to Affordable Housing (up to 2 points).

Under this policy priority, higher rating points are available to (1) governmental applicants that are able to demonstrate successful efforts in removing regulatory barriers to affordable housing, and (2) nongovernmental applicants that are associated with jurisdictions that have undertaken successful efforts in removing barriers. For applicants to obtain the policy priority points for efforts to successfully remove regulatory barriers, applicants would have to complete form HUD 27300, “Questionnaire for HUD's Initiative on Removal of Regulatory Barriers.” A copy of HUD's Notice entitled America's Affordable Communities Initiative, HUD's Initiative on Removal of Regulatory Barriers: Announcement of Incentive Criteria on Barrier Removal in HUD's 2004 Competitive Funding Allocations' can be found on HUD's Web site at http://www.hud.gov/grants/index.cfm. A description of the policy priority and a copy of form HUD-27300 can be found in the General Section to the SuperNOFA. Applicants are encouraged to read the Notice as well as the General Section of the SuperNOFA to obtain an understanding of this policy priority and how it can impact their score. A limited number of questions expressly request the applicant to provide brief documentation with their response. Other questions require that for each affirmative statement made, the applicant must supply a reference, URL, or a brief statement indicating where the back-up information may be found, and a point of contact, including a telephone number and/or email address.

d. Rating Factor 4: Leveraging Resources (20 Points)

This factor addresses the applicant's ability to secure community resources that can be combined with HUD's grant resources to achieve program purposes. Applicants are required to create partnerships with organizations that can help achieve their program's goals. PHAs are required by section 12(d)(7) of the U.S. Housing Act of 1937 entitled “Cooperation Agreements for Economic Self-Sufficiency Activities”) to make best efforts to enter into such agreements with relevant state or local agencies. In rating this factor, HUD will look at the extent to which applicants partner, coordinate and leverage their services with other organizations serving the same or similar populations.

Additionally, applicants must have at least a 25 percent cash or in-kind match. The match is a threshold requirement. Joint applicants must together have at least a 25 percent match. Applicants who do not demonstrate the minimum 25 percent match will fail the threshold requirement and will not receive further consideration for funding. Leveraging in excess of the 25 percent of the grant amount will receive a higher point value. In evaluating this factor HUD will consider the extent to which applicants have partnered with other entities to secure additional resources, which will increase the effectiveness of the proposed program activities. The additional resources and services must be firmly committed, must support the proposed grant activities and must, in combined amount (including in-kind contributions of personnel, space and/or equipment, and monetary contributions) equal at least 25 percent of the grant amount requested in this application. “Firmly committed” means that the amount of resources and their dedication to ROSS-funded activities must be explicit, in writing and signed by a person authorized to make the commitment. Please see the section on Threshold Requirements for more information.

Points for this factor will be awarded based on the documented evidence of partnerships and firm commitments and the ratio of requested ROSS funds to the total proposed grant budget.

Points will be assigned based on the following scale:

Percentage of match Points awarded
25 5 points (with partnerships) 3 points (without partnerships).
26-50 10 points (with partnerships) 8 points (without partnerships).
51-75 15 points (with partnerships) 13 points (without partnerships).
76-99 or above 20 points (with partnerships) 18 points (without partnerships).

e. Rating Factor 5: Achieving Results and Program Evaluation (10 Points)

An important element in this year's NOFA is the development and reporting of performance measures and outcomes. This factor emphasizes HUD's determination to ensure that applicants meet commitments made in their applications and grant agreements and that they assess their performance so that they realize performance goals. Applicants must demonstrate how they propose to measure their success and outcomes as they relate to the Department's Strategic Plan.

HUD requires ROSS applicants to develop an effective, quantifiable, outcome-oriented plan for measuring performance and determining that goals have been met. Applicants must use the Logic Model form HUD-96010 for this purpose.

Applicants must establish interim benchmarks, or outputs, for their proposed program that lead to the ultimate achievement of outcomes. “Outputs” are the direct products of a program's activities. Examples of outputs are: The number of eligible families that participate in supportive services, the number of new services provided, the number of residents receiving counseling, or the number of households using a technology center. Outputs should produce outcomes for your program.

“Outcomes” are benefits accruing to the residents, families and/or communities during or after participation in the ROSS program. Applicants must clearly identify the outcomes to be achieved and measured. Examples of outcomes are: Increasing the homeownership rates among residents of a development or from a particular housing authority, increasing residents' financial stability (e.g., increasing assets of a household through savings), or increasing employment stability (e.g., whether persons assisted obtain or retain employment for one or two years after job training completion). Outcomes are not the actual development or delivery of services or program activities.

This rating factor requires that applicants identify program outputs, outcomes, and performance indicators that will allow applicants to measure their performance. Performance indicators should be objectively quantifiable and measure actual achievements against anticipated achievements. Applicants' narrative, work plan, and Logic Model should identify what applicants are going to measure, how they are going to measure it, and the steps they have in place to make adjustments to their work plan and management practices if performance targets begin to fall short of established benchmarks and time frames. Applicants' proposal must also show how they will measure the performance of partners and affiliates. Applicants must include the standards, data sources, and measurement methods they will use to measure performance.

In order to respond to this factor, applicants should use the sample performance measures HUD-52758 located in the Appendix as a guide. Applicants will be evaluated based on how comprehensively they propose to measure their program's outcomes.

B. Review and Selection Process

1. Review Process for All Grant Categories and All Applicants. Four types of reviews will be conducted: a screening to determine if you are eligible to apply for funding under the ROSS grant category to which you are applying; whether your application submission is complete, on time and meets threshold; a review by the field office to evaluate past performance; and a technical review to rate your application based on the five rating factors provided in this NOFA.

2. Selection Process for All Grant Categories and All Applicants: The selection process is designed to achieve geographic diversity of grant awards throughout the country. For each grant category, HUD will first select the highest ranked application from each of the ten federal regions and DPONAP for funding. After this “round,” HUD will select the second highest ranked application in each of the ten federal regions and DPONAP for funding (the second round). HUD will continue this process with the third, fourth, and so on, highest ranked applications in each federal region and DPONAP until the last complete round is selected for funding. If available funds exist to fund some but not all eligible applications in the next round, HUD will make awards to those remaining applications in rank order (by score) regardless of region and DPONAP and will fully fund as many as possible with remaining funds. If remaining funds in one grant category are too small to make an award, they may be transferred to another category under the ROSS program.

3. Tie Scores. In the event of a tie between two applications in the same category which target the same developments, HUD will select the application that was received first.

4. Deficiency Period. Applicants will have 14 calendar days in which to provide missing information requested from HUD. For other information on correcting deficient applications, please see the General Section of the SuperNOFA.

VI. Award Administration Information Back to Top

A. Award Notices

HUD will make announcements of grant awards after the rating and ranking process is completed. Grantees will be notified by letter and will receive instructions for what steps they must take in order to access funding and begin implementing grant activities.

Applicants who are not funded will also receive letters via U.S. postal mail. Applicants who are not funded may request a debriefing. Applicants requesting to be debriefed must send a written request to: Iredia Hutchinson, Director, Grants Management Center, 501 School Street, SW., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20024. For applications submitted to the DPONAP, requests for a debriefing should be sent to Deborah Lalancette, Director, Grants Management, DPONAP, 1999 Broadway, Suite 3390, Denver, CO 80202. Please refer to the General Section of the SuperNOFA for additional information on debriefings.

B. Administrative and National Policy Requirements:

1. Environmental Impact. In accordance with24 CFR 58.34(a)(3) or (a)(9), 58.35(b)(2), (b)(4) or (b)(5), 50.19(b)(3), (b)(9), (b)(12), (b)(14), or (b)(15) activities under this ROSS program are categorically excluded from the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and are not subject to environmental review under related laws and authorities.

2. Applicable Requirements. Grantees are subject to regulations and other requirements found in:

a. 24 CFR 84 “Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Agreements with Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals, and Other Nonprofit Organizations”

b. 24 CFR 85 “Administrative Requirements for Grants and Cooperative Agreements to State, Local, and Federally Recognized Indian Tribal Governments”

c. 24 CFR 964 “Tenant Participation and Tenant Opportunities in Public Housing”

d. OMB Circular A-87 “Cost Principles for State, Local, and Indian Tribal Governments”

e. OMB Circular A-110 “Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Other Agreements with Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals and Other Non-Profit Organizations”

f. OMB Circular A-122 “Cost Principles for Non-Profit Organizations”

g. OMB Circular A-133 “Audits of States, Local Governments, and Non-Profit Organizations”

3. Economic Opportunities for Low- and Very Low-Income Persons (Section 3). For further information see the General Section.

4. Fair Housing and Civil Rights Laws. Applicants and their subrecipients must comply with all Fair Housing and Civil Rights laws, statutes, regulations, and Executive Orders as enumerated in 24 CFR 5.105(a), as applicable. Please see the General Section of the SuperNOFA for more information.

5. Requirements Applicable to All Programs. Applicants should refer to “Requirements and Procedures Applicable to All Programs” of the General Section of the SuperNOFA for requirements pertaining specifically to procurement of recovered materials and for information regarding other requirements to which they may be subject.

C. Reporting

1. Semi-Annual Performance Reports. Grantees shall submit semi-annual performance reports to the field office or area ONAP. These progress reports shall include financial reports (SF-269A) and a narrative describing milestones, work plan progress, and problems encountered and methods used to address these problems. HUD anticipates that some of the reporting of financial status and grant performance will be through electronic or Internet-based submissions. Grantees shall use quantifiable data to measure performance against goals and objectives outlined in their work plan. Applicants that receive awards from HUD should be prepared to report on additional measures that HUD may designate at time of award. Performance reports are due to the field office on July 30 and January 31 of each year. If reports are not received by the due date, grant funds will be suspended until reports are received.

2. Final Report. All grantees shall submit a final report to their local field office or area ONAP that will include a financial report (SF-269A) and a narrative evaluating overall performance against its work plan. Grantees shall use quantifiable data to measure performance against goals and objectives outlined in their work plan. The financial report shall contain a summary of all expenditures made from the beginning of the grant agreement to the end of the grant agreement and shall include any unexpended balances. The final narrative and financial report shall be due to the field office 90 days after the termination of the grant agreement

3. Final Audit. Grantees are required to obtain a complete final close-out audit of the grant's financial statements by a Certified Public Accountant (CPA), in accordance with generally accepted government audit standards. A written report of the audit must be forwarded to HUD within 60 days of issuance. Grant recipients must comply with the requirements of 24 CFR part 84 or 24 CFR part 85 as stated in OMB Circulars A-87, A-110, and A-122, as applicable.

4. Racial and Ethnic Data. HUD requires that funded recipients collect racial and ethnic beneficiary data. It has adopted the Office of Management and Budget's Standards for the Collection of Racial and Ethnic Data. In view of these requirements, you should use HUD-27061, the Racial and Ethnic Data Reporting Form (instructions are included), which can be found at: http://www.HUDclips.org; a comparable form; or a comparable electronic data system for this purpose.

5. Logic Model. For each reporting period, as part of your required report to HUD, you must include a completed Logic Model (Form HUD-96010), which identifies output and outcome achievements.

VII. Agency Contact(s) Back to Top

For questions and technical assistance, you may call the Public and Indian Housing Information and Resource Center at 800-955-2232. For persons with hearing or speech impairments, please call the toll-free Federal Relay Service at 800-877-8339. In the case of tribes/TDHEs, please contact DPONAP at 800-561-5913 or (303) 675-1600 (this is not a toll-free number).

VIII. Other Information Back to Top

A. Code of Conduct

Please see the General Section of the SuperNOFA for more information.

B. Transfer of Funds

If transfer of funds from any of the ROSS programs does become necessary, HUD will give first priority to Homeownership Supportive Services, second priority to Family Self-Sufficiency, third priority to RSDM-Family, and fourth priority to RSDM-Elderly.

C. Paperwork Reduction Act

The information collection requirements contained in this document have been approved by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501-3520) and assigned OMB control number 2577-0229. In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act, HUD may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to, a collection of information unless the collection displays a currently valid OMB control number. Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average ten hours per annum per respondent for the application and grant administration. This includes the time for collecting, reviewing, and reporting the data for the application, semi-annual reports and final report. The information will be used for grantee selection and monitoring the administration of funds. Response to this request for information is required in order to receive the benefits to be derived.

D. Appendix of Forms

The forms specific to the ROSS Program follow.

BILLING CODE 4210-32-P

Public Housing Family Self-Sufficiency Program Under the Resident Opportunities and Self-Sufficiency (ROSS) Program; Overview Information Back to Top

A. Federal Agency Name: Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Public and Indian Housing.

B. Funding Opportunity Title: This NOFA is for the Public Housing Family Self-Sufficiency program under the Resident Opportunities and Self-Sufficiency (ROSS) Program.

C. Announcement Type: Initial announcement.

D. Funding Opportunity Number: The Federal Register number for this NOFA is: FR-4900-N-33. The OMB approval number is: 2577-0229.

E. Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number(s): Resident Opportunity and Self Sufficiency, 14.870.

F. Dates: The application due date is July 28, 2004. Please see the General Section of the SuperNOFA for application submission, delivery, and timely receipt requirements.

G. Optional, Additional Overview Content Information:

1. Purpose of Program: The purpose of the Family Self-Sufficiency (FSS) program for Public Housing is to provide funding for Public Housing Authorities (PHAs) to hire a program coordinator to link participating families to the supportive services they need to achieve self-sufficiency.

2. Funding Available: The Department expects to award a total of $16 million under the FSS program in Fiscal Year 2004.

3. Award Amounts: Award amounts will range based on locality pay rates for professions similar to that of an FSS program coordinator. Individual award amounts will not exceed $63,000 to pay for the annual salary and fringe benefits of the program coordinator plus an additional 10 percent of such amount to pay a portion of the cost of paying for the services of a Contract Administrator who will act on behalf of a troubled PHA to carry out activities described in this NOFA.

4. Eligible Applicants. Eligible applicants are PHAs that administer public housing programs. Renewal applicants and new applicants to the program must have an approved Public Housing FSS Action Plan on file with their local HUD field office prior to this NOFA's application deadline. Please see the Threshold Requirements section for more information.

Nonprofit organizations, resident associations, and tribes/tribally designated housing entities (TDHEs) are not eligible for funding under this program.

5. Cost Sharing/Match Requirement: There is no match requirement under this funding program.

6. Grant term. The grant term for FSS is one year from the execution date of the grant agreement.

Grant program Total funding Eligible applicants Maximum Grant Amount
Public Housing Family Self-Sufficiency $16 million PHAs only $63,000 maximum salary amount plus 10% of requested amount for troubled PHAs to use towards the services of a contract administrator.

Full Text of Announcement

I. Funding Opportunity Description Back to Top

A. Program Description

The FSS program provides funding for PHAs to pay for the salary and fringe benefits of a program coordinator who will work with participating families to link them to the supportive services they need to achieve self-sufficiency and, for troubled PHAs only, a portion of the cost of obtaining the services of a contract administrator.

A PHA administering the FSS program must use a Program Coordinating Committee (PCC) to assist the PHA to secure the resources necessary to implement the FSS program. A PCC is made up of representatives of businesses, local government, job training and employment agencies, local welfare agencies, educational institutions, childcare providers, and nonprofit service providers, including faith-based and other community organizations. See 24 CFR 984.202 for more information.

HUD is looking for applications that either build on existing Public Housing FSS programs or propose to implement a new Public Housing FSS program. Applicants who propose to link to other ROSS-funded self-sufficiency programs will receive five additional points (see Rating Factor 3 1(a)(i)).

B. Definition of Terms

1. Action Plan describes the policies and procedures of the PHA for operation of a local FSS program, and contains the following information (for a full description of what at a minimum the Action Plan must contain, please see 24 CFR 984.201):

a. Family demographics. A description of the number, size, characteristics, and other demographics (including racial and ethnic data), and the supportive services needs of the families expected to participate in the FSS program;

b. Estimate of participating families. A description of the number of eligible FSS families who can reasonably be expected to receive supportive services under the FSS program, based on available and anticipated Federal, tribal, State, local, and private resources;

c. Eligible families from other self-sufficiency programs. The number of families participating in other federal, state, or local self-sufficiency programs (provide program name and sponsoring organization) that are expected to execute an FSS contract of participation.

d. FSS Family selection procedures. A statement indicating the procedures to be utilized to select families for participation in the FSS program.

e. Incentives to encourage participation. Description of the FSS account and other incentives the PHA will offer participating families.

f. Outreach efforts. The Action Plan must describe the efforts the PHA will make to recruit FSS participants.

g. FSS activities and supportive services consist of a description of the activities and supportive services to be provided by both public and private sources.

h. Additional requirements. Additional requirements are found in 24 CFR 984.201.

2. Contract Administrator means an overall grant administrator and/or a financial management agent that oversees the implementation of the grant and/or the financial aspects of the grant.

3. Past Performance is a threshold requirement. HUD's field offices will evaluate data provided by applicants as well as applicants' past performance to determine whether an applicant has the capacity to manage the grant for which they are applying. Please see the section on Threshold Requirements for more information.

4. Person with disabilities means a person who:

(1) Has a condition defined as a disability in section 223 of the Social Security Act;

(2) Has a developmental disability as defined in section 102 of the Developmental Disabilities Assistance Bill of Rights Act; or

(3) Is determined to have a physical, mental, or emotional impairment which:

(a) Is expected to be of long-continued and indefinite duration;

(b) Substantially impedes his or her ability to live independently; and

(c) Is of such a nature that such ability could be improved by more suitable housing conditions.

The term “person with disabilities” does not exclude persons who have acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) or any conditions arising from the etiologic agent for AIDS. In addition, no individual shall be considered a person with disabilities, for purposes of eligibility for low-income housing, solely on the basis of any drug or alcohol dependence.

The definition provided above for persons with disabilities is the proper definition for determining program qualifications. However, the definition of a person with disabilities contained in section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and its implementing regulations must be used for purposes of reasonable accommodations.

5. Program Coordinator under the Family Self-Sufficiency (FSS) program is someone responsible for linking FSS program participants to supportive services; working with the Program Coordinating Committee and local service providers to ensure that the necessary services and linkages to community resources are being made; ensuring through case management that the services included in participants' contracts of participation are provided on a regular, ongoing and satisfactory basis; making sure that participants are fulfilling their responsibilities under the contracts and that FSS escrow accounts are established and properly maintained for eligible families. FSS coordinators may also perform job development functions for the FSS program.

6. Project is the same as “low-income housing project” as defined in section 3(b)(1) of the United States Housing Act of 1937 (42 U.S.C. 1437 a(b)(1)) (1937 Act).

7. Secretary means the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development.

C. Regulations Governing the FSS Program

The FSS program is governed by 24 CFR part 984.

II. Award Information Back to Top

A. Total Funding

The Department expects to award $16 million under the PH Family Self-Sufficiency program. Funding amounts for individual grantees will be contingent upon HUD field office approval.

B. Grant Period

One year. The grant period shall begin the day the grant agreement and the form HUD-1044, “Assistance Award/Amendment” are signed by both the grantee and HUD.

C. Grant Extensions

Requests to extend the grant term beyond the originally established grant term must be submitted in writing by the grantee to the local HUD field office. Such requests must be done prior to grant termination and with enough notice to give the field office a reasonable amount of time to fully evaluate the request. Requests must explain why the extension is necessary, what work remains to be completed, and what work and progress was accomplished to date. Grants may be extended for a period of 6 months but not more than one year.

D. Type of Award

Grant agreement.

III. Eligibility Information Back to Top

A. Eligible Applicants

Eligible applicants are public housing agencies (PHAs), which administer public housing programs. New and renewal applicants to the program must have an approved PH FSS Action Plan on file with their local HUD field office prior to this NOFA's application deadline.

Nonprofit organizations, resident associations, and tribes/TDHEs are not eligible for funding under this program.

B. Cost Sharing or Matching

There is no match requirement under this funding program.

C. Other

1. Threshold Requirements. Applicants must respond to each threshold requirement clearly and thoroughly by following the instructions below. If your application fails one threshold requirement (regardless of the type of threshold) it will be considered a failed application and will not receive consideration for funding. The following are threshold requirements that are applicable to this ROSS component:

a. Past Performance. HUD's field offices will evaluate data provided by applicants as well as applicants' past performance to determine whether an applicant has the capacity to manage the FSS program. For applicants required to have a contract administrator, field offices will evaluate the contract administrator for past performance. Using Rating Factor 1, the field office will evaluate applicants' past performance. If applicants fail to address what is requested in Rating Factor 1, their application will fail this threshold and will not receive further consideration.

b. Contract Administrator Partnership Agreement. PHAs that are troubled at the time of application are required to submit a signed Contract Administrator Partnership Agreement. The agreement must be for the entire grant term. Grant award shall be contingent upon having a signed Partnership Agreement included in your application. Troubled PHAs are not eligible to be contract administrators. Grant writers who assist applicants prepare their FSS applications are also ineligible to be contract administrators. For more information on contract administrators, please see the section on Program Requirements below.

c. FSS Action Plan. New applicants to the program must have a HUD approved Public Housing FSS Action Plan on file with their local HUD field office prior to this NOFA's application deadline. PHAs with previously approved Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) FSS Action Plans may either amend their HCV FSS Action Plan to include the PH FSS program or may submit a separate PH FSS Action Plan for HUD field office approval. New PH FSS Action Plans and amendments to existing Action Plans must be submitted to applicants' local HUD field office well enough in advance, but at least 30 days before the FSS NOFA deadline, to ensure enough time for field office approval of the PH FSS Action Plan prior to the NOFA deadline. FSS Action Plans must comply with 24 CFR 984.201.

d. Ineligible Activities. Any application that proposes one or more ineligible activity will be disqualified and not considered for funding.

e. Minimum Score for All Fundable Applications. Applications that pass all threshold requirements and go through the ranking and rating process, must receive a minimum score of 75 in order to be considered for funding.

f. The Dunn and Bradstreet Universal Numbering System (DUNS) Number Requirement. Refer to the General Section of the SuperNOFA for information regarding the DUNS requirement. You will need to obtain a DUNS number to receive an award from HUD. This threshold requirement is curable.

2. Program Requirements:

a. Hiring a Public Housing FSS program coordinator. Funds awarded to PHAs under this NOFA may only be used to employ or otherwise retain the services of a Public Housing FSS program coordinator for the one year grant term and for troubled PHAs, to pay for the services of a contract administrator (see item “h” below). A part-time program coordinator may be retained where appropriate. The FSS program coordinator must:

(1) Work with the PCC and with local service providers to ensure that Public Housing FSS program participants are linked to the supportive services they need to achieve self-sufficiency.

(2) Ensure through case management that the services included in participants' contracts of participation are provided on a regular, ongoing and satisfactory basis, that participants are fulfilling their responsibilities under the contracts and that FSS escrow accounts are established and properly maintained for eligible families. FSS coordinators may also perform job development functions for the FSS program.

(3) Under normal circumstances, a full-time FSS program coordinator should be able to serve approximately 50 FSS program participants, depending on the coordinator's case management functions.

(4) Monitor the progress of program participants and evaluate the overall success of the program. For more information on how to measure performance, please see Rating Factor 4 in the “Application Review Information” section of this NOFA.

b. Outreach. PHAs are encouraged to outreach to persons with disabilities who are Public Housing residents and might be interested in participating in the FSS program and to include agencies on their FSS PCC that work with and provide services for families with disabilities.

c. Eligible families. Current residents of public housing are eligible. Eligible families who are currently enrolled or participating in local public housing self-sufficiency programs are also eligible.

d. Contract of participation. Each family that is selected to participate in an FSS program must enter into a contract of participation with the PHA that operates the FSS program in which the family will participate. The contract shall be signed by the head of the FSS family.

e. Contract term. The contract with participating families shall be for five years during which time each family will be required to fulfill its contractual obligations. PHAs may extend contracts for no more than two years for any family that requests in writing an extension of its contract provided the PHA finds that good cause exists to provide an extension. See 24 CFR 984.303 for more information on contracts of participation.

f. Escrow accounts for very low or low income participating families. Such accounts shall be computed using the guidelines set forth in 24 CFR 984.305. NOTE: FSS families who are not low-income are not entitled to an escrow/credit.

g. Number of Program Coordinators.

(1) Renewal PHAs. PHAs that received funding from the Operating Fund may apply for renewal of each FSS coordinator position(s) that has been filled by the PHA in either of the past two years under the Operating Fund. Funding for more than one program coordinator position is contingent upon HUD field office approval. For renewal PHAs, HUD will fund a one percent increase over the amount most recently funded but not to exceed $63,000 for the FSS program coordinator(s) salary and fringe benefits.

(2) New PHAs. A PHA that has not received funding under the Operating Fund for a PH FSS Program Coordinator may apply for only one program coordinator position as follows:

(a) Up to one full-time FSS coordinator position for a PHA with HUD approval to administer an FSS program of 25 or more FSS slots.

(b) Up to one full-time position per application for joint PHA applicants that have HUD approval to administer a total of at least 25 Public Housing FSS slots between or among them.

h. Contract Administrator. The Contract Administrator must assure that the financial management system and procurement procedures that will be in place during the grant term will fully comply with 24 CFR part 85. CAs are expressly forbidden from accessing HUD's Line of Credit Control System (LOCCS) and submitting vouchers on behalf of grantees. Contract administrators must also assist PHAs meet HUD's reporting requirements, see Section VI.C. “Reporting” for more information. Contract administrators may be: Local Housing Agencies; community-based organizations such as Community Development Corporations (CDCs), churches, temples, synagogues, mosques; nonprofit organizations; State/Regional associations and organizations. Troubled PHAs are not eligible to be contract administrators. Grant writers who assist applicants prepare their FSS applications are also ineligible to be contract administrators. Troubled PHA applicants without a contract administrator in place at the time of grant application may request an additional amount to pay for the cost of obtaining the services of a contract administrator (such amount may not exceed 10 percent of the amount the PHA has requested for the program coordinator's salary and fringe benefits). For example, if a troubled PHA needs the services of a contract administrator, and is requesting $63,000 for the program coordinator's salary, the applicant may request an additional 10 percent or $6,300 to pay for a contract administrator. Organizations that the applicant proposes to use as the contract administrator must not violate or be in violation of conflicts of interest as defined in 24 CFR part 84 and 24 CFR part 85.

3. Number of Applications Permitted:

a. General. PHA applicants may submit only one application under this category. PHA applicants may submit one application for each of the other funding categories under ROSS (Resident Service Delivery Models-Family, Resident Service Delivery Models-Elderly/Persons with Disabilities and Homeownership Supportive Services) and one application under the Public Housing Neighborhood Networks grant program; however applicants must submit separate applications for each funding category.

b. Joint applications. Two or more PHAs may join together to submit a joint application under this NOFA. Joint applications must designate a lead applicant. Both lead and non-lead applicants are subject to threshold requirements. Applicants who submit joint applications may not also submit separate applications as sole applicants under this NOFA.

4. Eligible Participants: All program participants must be residents of conventional public housing.

5. Program Requirements. All applicants and grantees must comply with the program requirements contained in Section III.C. of the General Section of the SuperNOFA.

IV. Application and Submission Information Back to Top

A. Addresses To Request Application Package

There is no application kit this year. All forms and necessary information for applying are contained within this NOFA. Please refer to the General Section of the SuperNOFA for information on how to obtain hard copies of this NOFA. You may also visit http://www.hud.gov to obtain a copy of this NOFA.

B. Content and Form of Application Submission

1. Application Format: Before preparing an application to the FSS program, applicants should carefully review the program description, ineligible activities and threshold requirements which are found in this NOFA. Applicants should also review each rating factor found in the “Application Review Information” section before writing a narrative response. Applicants' narratives should be as descriptive as possible, ensuring that every requested item is addressed. Applicants should make sure to include all requested information, according to the instructions found in this NOFA and where applicable, in the General Section of the SuperNOFA. This will help ensure a fair and accurate review of your application.

2. Content and Format for Submission: Applicants must propose programs which meet the program requirements as outlined above. Applicants are reminded that any application proposing one or more ineligible activities will not be funded. Finally, applicants must submit their applications according to the “Format” section below.

a. Content of Application:

Applicants must write narrative responses to each of the rating factors which follow this section. Applicants will be evaluated on whether their responses demonstrate that they have the necessary capacity to successfully manage this grant program. Applicants should ensure that their narratives are written clearly and concisely so that HUD reviewers, who may not be familiar with the FSS program, may fully understand your proposal. HUD encourages applicants to carefully review each rating factor, the regulations governing the FSS program, 24 CFR part 984, and the General Section of the SuperNOFA prior to responding to each rating factor.

b. Format of Application:

(1) Applications may not exceed 35 narrative pages. Narrative pages must be typed, double-spaced, numbered, use Times New Roman font style, and font size 12. Applications should be submitted in a three-ring binder with materials organized behind tabs according to the outline provided below. Supporting documentation, required forms, and certificates will not be counted towards the 35 page limit. However, applicants should make every effort to submit only what is necessary in terms of supporting documentation.

(2) Format for submission of SuperNOFA forms, FSS forms and narrative responses.

TAB 1: Required Forms from the General Section of the SuperNOFA and other ROSS forms: SF-424 Application for Federal Assistance;

1. SF-424 Supplement, Survey on Ensuring Equal Opportunity for Applicants;

2. Questionnaire for HUD's Initiative on Removal of Regulatory Barriers (HUD- 27300);

3. HUD-52751 Fact Sheet

4. HUD-424 B Applicant Assurances and Certifications;

5. HUD-424 CB Grant Application Detailed Budget;

6. HUD-2880 Applicant Disclosure/Update Report;

7. HUD-2990 Certification of Consistency with RC/EZ/EC Strategic Plan (if applicable);

8. HUD-2991 Certification of Consistency with the Consolidated Plan (if applicable);

9. SF-LLL Disclosure of Lobbying Activities (if applicable);

10. SF-LLL-A Disclosure of Lobbying Activities Continuation Sheet (if applicable);

11. HUD-2993 Acknowledgement of Application Receipt; and

12. HUD-2994 Client Comments and Suggestions (optional)

TAB 2: Threshold Requirements:

  • Contract Administrator Partnership Agreement (required for troubled PHAs) (HUD-52755)

TAB 3: Narrative for Rating Factor 1 and ROSS Program Forms:

1. Narrative

2. Chart A: HUD52756 Program Staffing

3. Chart B: HUD 52757 Applicant/Administrator Track Record

4. Resume(s)/Position Description(s)

TAB 4: Narrative for Rating Factor 2.

TAB 5: Rating Factor 3:

1. Narrative

2. HUD 52767 Family Self-Sufficiency Funding Request Form

TAB 6: Narrative for Rating Factor 4.

TAB 7: Narrative for Rating Factor 4 and ROSS Program Forms:

1. Narrative 2. HUD 96010 Logic Model

C. Submission Dates and Times

1. Due Dates: The application due date is July 28, 2004. Please see the General Section of the SuperNOFA for application submission, delivery, and timely receipt requirements.

2. Proof of Timely Submission. Please see the General Section of the SuperNOFA for more information about how to submit your application to HUD. Applicants that fail to meet the deadline for application receipt will not receive funding consideration.

D. Intergovernmental Review

Not applicable.

E. Funding Restrictions

1. Reimbursement for Grant Application Costs: Applicants who receive an award under this program are prohibited from using FSS grant funds to reimburse any costs incurred in conjunction with preparation of their FSS grant application.

2. Covered Salaries:

a. Program Coordinator: All applicants may propose to hire a qualified program coordinator to run the grant program. The FSS program will fund up to $63,000 in combined annual salary and fringe benefits for a full-time program coordinator. For audit purposes, applicants must have documentation on file demonstrating that the salary they pay the program coordinator is comparable to similar professions in their local area.

b. Contract Administrator: Applicants may not request more than 10 percent of the total grant amount requested from HUD for the program coordinator's salary to pay for the services of a Contract Administrator. Only PHAs that are designated troubled at time of grant application may request additional funding for this purpose.

c. Eligible Salaries. FSS funds may only be used for the types of salaries described in this section according to the restrictions described herein. FSS funds may not be used to pay for salaries of any other kind.

3. Administrative Costs. FSS funds cannot be used to pay for administrative costs.

4. Ineligible Activities. Grant funds may not be used for ineligible activities such as:

a. The salary of an FSS coordinator for the Housing Choice Voucher FSS program;

b. Services for FSS program participants;

c. Elderly/Disabled Service Coordinator salary and fringe benefits;

d. Wages and/or salaries to participants for receiving supportive services and/or training programs;

e. The purchase of food;

f. The purchase, lease, or rental of land;

g. New construction, materials costs;

h. Rehab or physical improvements;

i. Entertainment costs;

j. Purchase, lease, or rental of vehicles;

k. Stipends;

l. Cost of application preparation; and

m. Costs which exceed limits identified in the NOFA for the following: Program Coordinator, and Contract Administrator.

5. Eligible Developments: Only conventional public housing developments may be served by FSS grant funds awarded under this NOFA. Other housing/developments, including, but not limited to, private housing, federally insured housing, federally subsidized or assisted (i.e., assisted under Section 8, Section 202, Section 811, Section 236), and others are not eligible to participate in this program.

F. Other Submission Requirements

1. Mailing Applications. Applicants to the PH FSS program should send their applications to: HUD Grants Management Center, Mail Stop: Public Housing Family Self-Sufficiency Program, 2001 Jefferson Davis Hwy, Suite 703, Arlington, VA 22202. Please see the General Section of the SuperNOFA for detailed mailing and delivery instructions.

2. Number of Copies. Applications must be submitted in triplicate (one original and two identical copies). The original and one identical copy must be sent to the Grants Management Center by the deadline. The other identical copy must be submitted to your local HUD field office by the deadline.

V. Application Review Information Back to Top

A. Criteria

1. Factors for Award Used to Evaluate and Rate Applications to the FSS program: The factors for rating and ranking applicants and maximum points for each factor are provided below. The maximum number of points available for this program is 102. This includes two RC/EZ/EC bonus points. The SuperNOFA contains a certification that must be completed in order for the applicant to be considered for RC/EZ/EC bonus points. A listing of federally designated RCs, EZs, ECs, and EECs is included as an appendix to the General Section of the SuperNOFA and is also available from the NOFA Information Center. The agency certifying to RC/EZ/EC status must be listed in the appendix of the SuperNOFA to be eligible to receive the bonus points.

Note:

Applicants should carefully review each rating factor before writing a response. Applicants' narratives should be as descriptive as possible, ensuring that every requested item is addressed. Applicants should make sure their narratives thoroughly address the Rating Factors below and to include all requested information, according to the instructions found in this NOFA. This will help ensure a fair and accurate application review.

a. Rating Factor 1: Capacity of the Applicant and Relevant Organizational Staff (35 Points)

In rating this factor, HUD will consider the extent to which the proposal demonstrates that the applicant will have qualified and experienced program coordinator(s) dedicated to administering the program.

(1) Proposed Program Staffing (10 Points).

(a) Staff Experience (5 Points). The knowledge and experience of the proposed program coordinator(s) in planning and managing programs for which funding is being requested. Experience will be judged in terms of recent, relevant and successful experience of the program coordinator(s) to undertake eligible program activities. In rating this factor, HUD will consider experience within the last 5 years to be recent; experience similar to the functions of an FSS program coordinator to be relevant; and experience producing specific accomplishments to be successful. The more recent the experience and the more experience proposed staff have in successfully conducting and completing similar functions, the greater the number of points applicants will receive for this rating factor. The following information should be provided in order to provide HUD an understanding of proposed staff's experience and capacity:

(i) The staff's relevant educational background and/or work experience; and

(ii) Relevant and successful experience running programs whose activities are similar to the FSS Program.

(b) Staff Capacity (5 Points). Applicants will be evaluated based on whether they have staff in place or will be able to quickly access qualified professional(s), to administer the FSS program in a timely and effective fashion. Applicants' narrative must describe their ability to immediately begin implementing an FSS program. Attach resumes and position descriptions (where staff is not yet hired) for the program coordinator position. (Resume(s)/position description(s) do not count toward the 35-page limit.)

(2) Past Performance of Applicant/Contract Administrator (15 Points) Applicants' narrative must describe how they (or their contract administrator) successfully implemented grant programs (including those listed below) designed to assist low-income families and individuals achieve economic self-sufficiency or move from welfare to work. Renewal applicants should include facts and statistics in their narrative from past annual performance reports and/or the FSS addendum to Form HUD-50058. Applicants' past experience may include, but is not limited to, running and managing programs aimed at assisting residents of low-income housing achieve economic self-sufficiency and/or moving from welfare to work, such as ROSS, FSS, or Youthbuild. Applicants' narrative must indicate the grants they received and managed, the grant amounts, and grant terms (years) of the grants that they are counting towards past experience.

Applicants will be evaluated according to the following criteria:

(a) Achievement of specific measurable outcomes and objectives in terms of benefits gained by participating residents. (5 Points). Applicants should describe results their programs have obtained, for example: higher incomes, higher rates of employment, increased savings; and moving out of subsidized housing to market-rate housing.

(b) Describe success in attracting and keeping residents involved in past grant-funded training programs. (5 Points) HUD wants to see that applicants' grant-funded programs benefited a significant numbers of residents;

(c) Description of timely fund expenditure throughout the term of past grants. (5 Points) Timely means regular drawdowns throughout the life of the grant, i.e. quarterly drawdowns, with all funds expended by the end of the grant term;

(3) Program Administration and Fiscal Management. (10 Points)

(a) Program Administration and Accountability. (5 Points). Applicants should describe how they will manage the program and how HUD can be sure that there is program accountability.

(b) Fiscal Management. (5 Points) In rating this factor, applicants' skills and experience in fiscal management will be evaluated. If applicants have had any audit or material weakness findings in the past five years, they will be evaluated on how well they have addressed them. Applicants must provide the following:

(i) A complete description of their fiscal management structure, including fiscal controls currently in place including those of a contract administrator for applicants required to have a contract administrator, (troubled PHAs);

(ii) Applicants must list any audit findings in the past five years (HUD Inspector General, management review, fiscal, etc.), material weaknesses and what has been done to address them;

(iii) Applicants who are required to have a contract administrator, must describe the skills and experience the contract administrator has in managing federal funds.

b. Rating Factor 2: Need/Extent of the Problem (20 Points)

In responding to this factor, you will be evaluated on the extent to which you describe and document the level of need for an FSS program coordinator in the communities you serve.

You should use statistics and analyses contained in data source(s) that are sound and reliable. Data that describes socioeconomic conditions at the local level can be found by going to the following Web sites: http://www.bls.gov (Bureau of Labor Statistics) or http://www.census.gov (US Census). Other types of sources include academic, state, and local sources. To the extent possible, the data you use should be specific to the population you propose to serve. You should document needs as they apply to the targeted population, rather than the entire region or state.

In responding to this factor, you must include:

(1) Socioeconomic Profile (10 points). A thorough socioeconomic profile of the eligible residents to be served by your program, including education levels, income levels, the number of single-parent families, economic statistics for the local area, etc.

(2) Local Training Program Information (10 points). Information on training programs currently available and easily accessible to residents either through the PHA or other local or state community organizations.

c. Rating Factor 3: Soundness of Approach (30 Points)

In rating this factor HUD will consider:

(1) Quality of Your Proposal (20 points). This factor evaluates your application based on the following criteria:

(a) Scope of Services (12 points). Your narrative should refer to the Public Housing FSS Action Plan submitted to your local HUD field office and it must describe how many people you plan to serve, whether you will expand your program over time, and how your program will:

(i) Link with other ROSS-funded self-sufficiency programs; (5 points)

(ii) Involve community partners in the delivery of services; (4 points) and

(iii) Link to comprehensive services versus a small range of services geared toward enhancing economic opportunities for residents (3 points).

(b) Feasibility and Demonstrable Benefits (4 points). This factor examines whether your proposal is logical, feasible and likely to achieve its stated purpose during the term of the grant. HUD's desire is to fund applications that will quickly produce demonstrable results and advance the purposes of the FSS program.

(i) Timeliness. This subfactor evaluates whether your proposal demonstrates that your project is ready to be implemented shortly after grant award, but not to exceed three months following the execution of the grant agreement. Your proposal must indicate timeframes and deadlines for accomplishing major activities.

(ii) Description of the problem and solution. Your proposal will be evaluated based on how well your proposal and approach to case management address the needs described in Rating Factor 2.

(c) Salary Appropriateness/Efficient Use of Grant. (4 Points)

You will be evaluated based on whether the salary you propose for the program coordinator is comparable to similar professions in your local area, your narrative must justify the salary you propose to pay the program coordinator by using local pay rates for comparable professions.

(2) Addressing HUD's Policy Priorities (10 points). HUD wants to improve the quality of life for those living in distressed communities. HUD's grant programs are a vehicle through which long-term, positive change can be achieved at the community level. Your proposal will be evaluated based on how well it meets the following HUD policy priorities:

(a) Improving the Quality of Life in Our Nation's Communities (5 points). In order to receive points in this category, your narrative must indicate how your FSS program will help residents successfully transition from welfare to work and earn higher wages.

(b) Providing Full and Equal Access to Grassroots Faith-Based and Other Community-Based Organizations in HUD Program Implementation (3 points). HUD encourages applicants to partner with grassroots organizations, e.g., civic organizations, grassroots faith-based and other community-based organizations that are not usually effectively utilized. These grassroots organizations have a strong history of providing vital community services such as developing first-time homeownership programs, creating economic development programs, providing job training and other supportive services. In order to receive points under this factor, your narrative must describe how you will work with these organizations and what types of services they will provide.

(c) Policy Priority for Increasing the Supply of Affordable Housing Through the Removal of Regulatory Barriers to Affordable Housing. (up to 2 points) Under this policy priority, higher rating points are available to (1) governmental applicants that are able to demonstrate successful efforts in removing regulatory barriers to affordable housing, and (2) nongovernmental applicants that are associated with jurisdictions that have undertaken successful efforts in removing barriers. For applicants to obtain the policy priority points for efforts to successfully remove regulatory barriers, applicants would have to complete form HUD 27300, “Questionnaire for HUD's Initiative on Removal of Regulatory Barriers.” A copy of HUD's Notice entitled “America's Affordable Communities Initiative, HUD's Initiative on Removal of Regulatory Barriers: Announcement of Incentive Criteria on Barrier Removal in HUD's 2004 Competitive Funding Allocations” can be found on HUD's Web site at http://www.hud.gov/grants/index.cfm. A description of the policy priority and a copy of form HUD 27300 can be found in the General Section to the SuperNOFA. Applicants are encouraged to read the Notice as well as the general section of the SuperNOFA to obtain an understanding of this policy priority and how it can impact their score. A limited number of questions expressly request the applicant to provide brief documentation with their response. Other questions require that for each affirmative statement made, the applicant must supply a reference, URL, or a brief statement indicating where the back-up information may be found, and a point of contact, including a telephone number and/or e-mail address.

d. Rating Factor 4: Achieving Results and Program Evaluation (15 Points)

An important element in this year's NOFA is the development and reporting of performance measures and outcomes. This factor emphasizes HUD's determination to ensure that applicants meet commitments made in their applications and grant agreements and that they assess their performance so that they realize performance goals. Applicants must demonstrate how they propose to measure their success and outcomes as they relate to the Department's Strategic Plan.

HUD requires FSS applicants to develop an effective, quantifiable, outcome-oriented plan for measuring performance and determining that goals have been met. Applicants must use the Logic Model Form (HUD-96010) for this purpose.

Applicants must establish interim benchmarks, or outputs, for their proposed program that lead to the ultimate achievement of outcomes. “Outputs” are the direct products of a program's activities. Examples of outputs are: The number of eligible families that participate in supportive services, the number of families enrolled, or the number of households that develop an escrow account. Outputs should produce outcomes for your program.

“Outcomes” are benefits accruing to the residents, families and/or communities during or after participation in the FSS program. Applicants must clearly identify the outcomes to be achieved and measured. Examples of outcomes are: Increasing residents' financial stability (e.g., increasing assets of a household through savings or escrow), increasing the number of FSS graduates, or increasing employment stability (e.g., whether persons assisted obtain or retain employment for one or two years after job training completion). Outcomes are not the actual development or delivery of services or program activities.

This rating factor requires that applicants identify program outputs, outcomes, and performance indicators that will allow applicants to measure their performance. Performance indicators should be objectively quantifiable and measure actual achievements against anticipated achievements. Applicants' narrative and Logic Model should identify what applicants are going to measure, how they are going to measure it, and the steps they have in place to make adjustments to their work or management practices if performance targets begin to fall short of established benchmarks and timeframes. Applicants must include the standards, data sources, and measurement methods they will use to measure performance.

In order to respond to this factor, applicants should use the sample performance measures (HUD-52758) located in the Appendix as a guide. Applicants will be evaluated based on how comprehensively they propose to measure their program's outcomes.

B. Review and Selection Process

1. Review Process: Four types of reviews will be conducted: A screening to determine if you are eligible to apply for funding under the FSS grant category; whether your application submission is complete, on time and meets threshold; a review by the field office to evaluate past performance and whether there is an approved PH FSS Action Plan on file with the field office; and a technical review to rate your application based on the four rating factors provided in this NOFA.

2. Selection Process: The selection process is designed to achieve geographic diversity of grant awards throughout the country. HUD will first select the highest ranked application from each of the ten federal regions for funding. After this “round,” HUD will select the second highest ranked application in each of the 10 federal regions (the second round). HUD will continue this process with the third, fourth, and so on, highest ranked applications in each federal region until the last complete round is selected for funding. If available funds exist to fund some but not all eligible applications in the next round, HUD will make awards to those remaining applications in rank order (by score) regardless of region and will fully fund as many as possible with remaining funds. If remaining funds are too small to make an award, they may be transferred to another ROSS funding category.

3. Tie Scores. In the event of a tie between two applications from the same region, HUD will select the application that was received first.

1. Deficiency Period. Applicants will have fourteen calendar days in which to provide missing information requested from HUD. For other information on correcting deficient applications, please see the General Section of the SuperNOFA.

VI. Award Administration Information Back to Top

A. Award Notices

HUD will make announcements of grant awards after the rating and ranking process is completed. Grantees will be notified by letter and will receive instructions for what steps they must take to access funding and begin implementing grant activities.

Applicants who are not funded will also receive letters via U.S. postal mail. Applicants who are not funded may request a debriefing. Applicants requesting to be debriefed must send a written request to: Iredia Hutchinson, Director, Grants Management Center, 501 School Street, SW., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20024. See the General Section of the SuperNOFA for additional information on debriefings.

B. Administrative and National Policy Requirements

1. Environmental Impact. No environmental review is required in connection with the award of assistance under this NOFA, because the NOFA only provides funds for employing a coordinator that provides public and supportive services and/or a contract administrator that provides administrative and management services, which are categorically excluded from environmental review under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321) and not subject to compliance actions for related environmental authorities under 24 CFR 50.19(b)(3), (4) and (12).

2. Applicable Requirements. Grantees are subject to regulations and other requirements found in:

a. OMB Circular A-87 “Cost principles for State, Local, and Indian Tribal Governments”.

b. OMB Circular A-133 “Audits of States, Local Governments, and Non-Profit Organizations”.

c. HUD Regulations 24 CFR part 984 “Section 8 and Public Housing Family Self-Sufficiency Program”.

d. HUD Regulations 24 CFR part 85 “Administrative Requirements for Grants and Cooperative Agreements to State, Local, and Federally Recognized Indian Tribal Governments”.

3. Economic Opportunities for Low- and Very Low-Income Persons (Section 3).

For further information see the General Section at III.C.4.c.

4. Applicants and their subrecipients must comply with all Fair Housing and Civil Rights laws, statutes, regulations, and Executive Orders as enumerated in 24 CFR 5.105(a), as applicable. Please see Section III.C.2 of the General Section of the SuperNOFA for more information.

5. Applicants should refer to Section III C “Requirements and Procedures Applicable to All Programs” of the General Section of the SuperNOFA for other requirements to which they may be subject.

C. Reporting

1. Semi-Annual Performance Reports. Grantees shall submit semi-annual performance reports to the field office. These progress reports shall include financial reports (SF-269A), the Logic Model, and a narrative describing milestones, progress, and problems encountered and methods used to address these problems. Grantees shall use quantifiable data to measure performance against goals and objectives outlined in their Logic Model. Performance reports are due to the field office on July 30 and January 31 of each year. If reports are not received by the due date, grant funds will be suspended until reports are received.

2. Reporting Using HUD-50058 Addendum. Grantees must report on PH FSS program participants to PIC using the HUD-50058 addendum to report on the enrollment, progress, and exit of individual families. Failure to report to PIC is a violation of the program and may result in grant termination.

3. Final Report. All grantees shall submit a final report to their local field office which will include a financial report (SF-269A) and a narrative evaluating overall performance against their Logic Model. Grantees shall use quantifiable data to measure performance against goals and objectives outlined in their Logic Model. The financial report shall contain a summary of salary expenditures made from the beginning of the grant agreement to the end of the grant agreement and shall include any unexpended balances. The final narrative and financial report shall be due to the field office 90 days after the termination of the grant agreement.

4. Racial and Ethnic Data. HUD requires that funded recipients collect racial and ethnic beneficiary data. It has adopted the Office of Management and Budget's Standards for the Collection of Racial and Ethnic Data. In view of these requirements, you should use HUD-27061, the Racial and Ethnic Data Reporting Form (instructions are included) which can be found at www.HUDclips.org; a comparable form; or a comparable electronic data system for this purpose.

VII. Agency Contact(s) Back to Top

For questions and technical assistance, you may call the Public and Indian Housing Information and Resource Center at 800-955-2232. For persons with hearing or speech impairments, please call the toll-free Federal Relay Service at 800-877-8339.

VIII. Other Information Back to Top

A. Code of Conduct: See the General Section of the SuperNOFA for more information.

B. Transfer of Funds. If transfer of funds from any of the ROSS programs does become necessary, HUD will give first priority to Homeownership Supportive Services, second priority to Family Self-Sufficiency, third priority to RSDM-Family, and fourth priority to RSDM-Elderly. HUD does not have the discretion to transfer funds for the Neighborhood Networks program to any other funding category under ROSS.

C. Paperwork Reduction Act: The information collection requirements contained in this document have been approved by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501-3520) and assigned OMB control number 2577-0229. In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act, HUD may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to, a collection of information unless the collection displays a currently valid OMB control number. Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average eight hours per annum per respondent for the application and grant administration. This includes the time for collecting, reviewing, and reporting the data for the application, semi-annual reports and final report. The information will be used for grantee selection and monitoring the administration of funds. Response to this request for information is required in order to receive the benefits to be derived.

D. Appendix of Forms. The forms specific to Public Housing FSS under the ROSS Program follow.

BILLING CODE 4210-32-P

Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Programs Back to Top

Overview Information Back to Top

A. Federal Agency Name: Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Community Planning and Development.

B. Funding Opportunity Title: Funding Availability for Continuum of Care (CoC) Homeless Assistance Programs.

C. Announcement Type: Initial announcement.

D. Funding Opportunity Number: FR-4900-N-29. The OMB Approval number is 2506-0112. The Federal Register number for this NOFA is: FR-4900-N-29.

E. Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Numbers:

1. 14.235, Supportive Housing Program (SHP)

2. 14.238, Shelter Plus Care (S+C)

3. 14.249, Section 8 Moderate Rehabilitation Single Room Occupancy (SRO)

F. DATES: Application Deadline: July 27, 2004. Your completed applications (an original containing the signed documentation and two copies) are due on or before July 27, 2004 to the addresses shown in Section IV.F. Please carefully read Section IV.C. of this program section as well as the General Section for all the critical information on your submission and HUD's acceptance of applications.

G. Additional Overview Content Information:

1. Purpose of the Programs: The purpose of the CoC Homeless Assistance Programs is to assist homeless persons to move to self-sufficiency and permanent housing.

2. Available Funds: Approximately $1 billion is available for funding.

3. Eligible Applicants: The program summary chart in Section III.A.3 identifies the eligible applicants for each of the three programs under the CoC Homeless Assistance Programs.

4. Match: Matching funds are required from local, state, federal or private resources.

Full Text of Announcement Back to Top

I. Funding Opportunity Description Back to Top

A. Program Description

1. Overview

a. The purpose of the CoC Homeless Assistance Programs is to reduce the incidence of homelessness in CoC communities by assisting homeless individuals and families to move to self-sufficiency and permanent housing. Projects that sustain current successful interventions and fill gaps in locally developed CoC systems will be funded. To help meet the current Administration's goal of ending chronic homelessness by 2012, priority will be placed on programs that target the supportive housing needs of this population.

2. Major Changes for 2004

a. Application Requirements. New this year, the applying CoC must assemble the entire application, including all projects, and submit it as a single mailed or hand-delivered package to HUD. Each application will consist of the CoC Exhibit and projects from one or more applicants and project sponsors. Individual projects in a CoC should not be submitted to HUD separately. Also new this year, submitted applications should only include the actual application questions and responses being provided. Do not include HUD's application instructions or any blank tables and charts.

b. Chronic Homelessness Priority. To help reach the goal of ending chronic homelessness by 2012, at least 10 percent of the FY 2004 homeless appropriation must be awarded to projects predominantly serving individuals experiencing chronic homelessness. New or renewal, transitional, safe haven or permanent housing projects that have at least 70 percent of their clients who are chronically homeless will count toward this target. Within the “Process and Strategy” rating factor, HUD will be giving added weight to the community's response to the chronic homelessness strategy goals including design and implementation of state and local 10-year planning processes.

c. Performance Measurement. A new “Performance Measurement” section is included and will be given the added weight of up to 5 points in the scoring process.

d. HMIS Implementation. An “HMIS Implementation” section is included and will be given the added weight of up to 5 points in the scoring process.

e. SHP Funds for HMIS. Starting this year, HUD has reserved the right to fund lower rated eligible dedicated HMIS projects receiving 40 need points and at least 25 Continuum points for at least one year to work toward the congressional goal of improving homeless data collection.

f. The “Process and Strategy” scoring has been reduced from 20 to 17 points.

g. The “Gaps and Priorities” scoring has been reduced from 15 to 10 points.

h. A new scoring opportunity on “Removing Barriers to Affordable Housing” valued at up to 2 points has been added to the “Process and Strategy” rating factor.

i. Projects must receive a minimum score of 65 points in the competition in order to receive any funding consideration for lower-rated SHP renewals.

j. The permanent housing bonus will now be applied using a sliding scale based on a Continuum of Care's preliminary “Pro Rata Need” amount.

k. The Supplemental Resources section has been simplified by replacing an extensive narrative section with a multiple-choice chart and the scoring has been reduced to 13 points from 15.

l. For each project, applicants will estimate the number of chronically homeless persons that will be served. In addition, the CoC will be required to describe any changes in the number of chronically homeless persons reported from 2003 to 2004.

m. Each project will indicate which subpopulations it will target.

n. Starting this year, grant terms for all newly proposed Supportive Housing Program projects, excluding HMIS projects, will be three years.

3. Developing CoC Systems: Developing a CoC system should be an inclusive process to assist homeless persons. It should be coordinated with the community's larger effort of developing a HUD required Consolidated Plan. Coordination with state and local 10-year plans to end chronic homelessness and Interagency Councils on Homelessness is also crucial to developing an inclusive CoC system. For a community to successfully address its often complex and interrelated problems, including homelessness, the community must marshal its varied resources—community and economic development resources, social service resources, housing and homeless assistance resources—and use them in a coordinated and effective manner. The Consolidated Plan serves as the vehicle for a community to comprehensively identify each of its needs and to coordinate a plan of action for addressing them.

4. CoC Components. A CoC system consists of five basic components:

a. A system of outreach and assessment for determining the needs and conditions of an individual or family who is homeless;

b. Emergency shelters with appropriate supportive services to help ensure that homeless individuals and families receive adequate emergency shelter and referral to necessary service providers or housing search counselors;

c. Transitional housing with appropriate supportive services to help those homeless individuals and families who are not prepared to make the transition to permanent housing and independent living; and

d. Permanent housing, or permanent supportive housing, to help meet the long-term needs of homeless individuals and families.

e. Prevention strategies play an integral role in a community's plan to eliminate homelessness. By law, prevention activities are ineligible activities in the three programs for which funds are awarded in this competition but are eligible for funding under the Emergency Shelter Grant block grant program.

5. CoC Planning Process. A CoC system is developed through a community-wide or region-wide process involving nonprofit organizations (including those representing persons with disabilities), government agencies, public housing authorities, community and faith-based organizations, other homeless providers, housing developers and service providers, private businesses and business associations, law enforcement agencies, private funding providers, and homeless or formerly homeless persons. A CoC system should address the specific needs of each homeless subpopulation: those experiencing chronic homelessness, veterans, persons with serious mental illnesses, persons with substance abuse issues, persons with HIV/AIDS, persons with co-occurring diagnoses (may include diagnoses of multiple physical disabilities or multiple mental disabilities or a combination of these two types), victims of domestic violence, youth, and any others. To ensure that the CoC system addresses the needs of homeless veterans, it is particularly important that you involve veteran service organizations with specific experience in serving homeless veterans.

6. CoC Funding is provided through the programs briefly described below. Please refer to the CoC Homeless Assistance Programs Chart in Section III.A.3 for a summary of each program:

a. The Supportive Housing Program (SHP) funds the development of transitional supportive housing and services that help homeless persons transition from homelessness to living as independently as possible and permanent supportive housing and services for disabled homeless persons.

b. The Shelter Plus Care (S+C) Program provides funding for rental assistance giving applicants flexibility in devising appropriate housing and supportive services for homeless persons with disabilities.

c. The Section 8 Moderate Rehabilitation Single Room Occupancy (SRO) Program provides rental assistance on behalf of homeless individuals in connection with the moderate rehabilitation of SRO dwellings.

7. Glossary of Terms

a. Applicant. An entity that applies to HUD for funds. See the CoC Homeless Assistance Programs Chart in Section III.A.1 for a list of entities that are eligible. In order to be an applicant, you must submit a SF-424. If selected for funding, the applicant becomes the grantee and is responsible for the overall management of the grant, including drawing grant funds and distributing them to project sponsors. The applicant may also be a project sponsor.

b. Applicant Certification. The form, required by law, in which an applicant certifies that it will adhere to certain statutory requirements, such as the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

c. Chronically Homeless Person. An unaccompanied homeless individual with a disabling condition who has either been continuously homeless for a year or more OR has had at least four episodes of homelessness in the past three years. Disabling condition is defined as “a diagnosable substance use disorder, serious mental illness, developmental disability, or chronic physical illness or disability, including the co-occurrence of two or more of these conditions.” In defining the chronically homeless, the term “homeless” means “a person sleeping in a place not meant for human habitation (e.g., living on the streets) or in an emergency homeless shelter.”

d. Consolidated Plan. A long-term housing and community development plan developed by state and local governments and approved by HUD. The Consolidated Plan contains information on homeless populations and should be coordinated with the CoC plan. It can be a source of information for the Gaps Analysis Chart. The plan contains both narratives and maps, the latter developed by localities using software provided by HUD.

e. Consoli