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Notice

Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Grant Applications Under Part D, Subpart 2 of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act

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Start Preamble Start Printed Page 52618

AGENCY:

Department of Education.

ACTION:

Notice inviting applications for new awards for fiscal year (FY) 2001.

SUMMARY:

This notice provides closing dates and other information regarding the transmittal of applications for FY 2001 competitions under four programs authorized by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), as amended. The four programs are: Special Education—Research and Innovation to Improve Services and Results for Children with Disabilities (seven priorities); Special Education—Technology and Media Services for Individuals with Disabilities (two priorities); Special Education—Training and Information for Parents of Children with Disabilities (one priority); and Special Education—Studies and Evaluations Program (one priority).

Goals 2000: Educate America Act

The Goals 2000: Education America Act (Goals 2000) focuses the Nation's education reform efforts on the eight National Education Goals and provides a framework for meeting them. Goals 2000 promotes new partnerships to strengthen schools and expands the Department's capacities for helping communities to exchange ideas and obtain information needed to achieve the goals.

These priorities would address the first National Education Goal that all children in America will start school ready to learn by helping to improve results for children with disabilities.

Waiver of Rulemaking

It is generally our practice to offer interested parties the opportunity to comment on proposed priorities. However, section 661(e)(2) of IDEA makes the Administrative Procedure Act (5 U.S.C. 553) inapplicable to the priorities in this notice.

General Requirements

(a) The projects funded under this notice must make positive efforts to employ and advance in employment qualified individuals with disabilities in project activities (see Section 606 of IDEA).

(b) Applicants and grant recipients funded under this notice must involve individuals with disabilities or parents of individuals with disabilities in planning, implementing, and evaluating the projects (see Section 661(f)(1)(A) of IDEA).

(c) The projects funded under these priorities must budget for a two-day Project Directors' meeting in Washington, DC during each year of the project.

(d) In a single application, an applicant must address only one absolute priority in this notice.

(e) Part III of each application submitted under a priority in this notice, the application narrative, is where an applicant addresses the selection criteria that are used by reviewers in evaluating the application. You must limit Part III to the equivalent of no more than the number of pages listed under each applicable priority, using the following standards:

  • A “page” is 8.5″ x 11″ (on one side only) with one-inch margins (top, bottom, and sides).
  • Double-space (no more than three lines per vertical inch) all text in the application narrative, including titles, headings, footnotes, quotations, and captions, as well as all text in charts, tables, figures, and graphs.
  • If using a proportional computer font, use no smaller than a 12-point font, and an average character density no greater than 18 characters per inch. If using a nonproportional font or a typewriter, do not use more than 12 characters per inch.

The page limit does not apply to Part I—the cover sheet; Part II—the budget section, including the narrative budget justification; Part IV, the assurances and certifications; or the one-page abstract, the resumes, the bibliography or references, or the letters of support. However, you must include all of the application narrative in Part III.

We will reject without consideration or evaluation any application if—

  • You apply these standards and exceed the page limit; or
  • You apply other standards and exceed the equivalent of the page limit.

Research and Innovation To Improve Services and Results for Children With Disabilities (CFDA 84.324)

Purpose of Program

To produce, and advance the use of, knowledge to: (1) Improve services provided under IDEA, including the practices of professionals and others involved in providing those services to children with disabilities; and (2) improve educational and early intervention results for infants, toddlers, and children with disabilities.

Eligible Applicants

State and local educational agencies; institutions of higher education; other public agencies; private nonprofit organizations; outlying areas; freely associated States; and Indian tribes or tribal organizations.

Applicable Regulations

(a) The Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) in 34 CFR parts 74, 75, 77, 80, 81, 82, 85, 86, 97, 98, and 99; (b) The selection criteria for the priorities under this program that are drawn from the EDGAR general selection criteria menu. The specific selection criteria for each priority are included in the funding application packet for the applicable competition.

Note:

The regulations in 34 CFR part 86 apply to institutions of higher education only.

Priority

Under 34 CFR 75.105(c)(3), we consider only applications that meet one of the following priorities:

Absolute Priority 1—Postsecondary Education Programs for Individuals Who Are Deaf (84.324A)

This priority provides support for four regional centers on postsecondary education for individuals who are deaf, including individuals with a wide range of hearing loss. Each center would provide technical assistance to a range of postsecondary institutions, including academic, vocational, technical, continuing, and adult education programs, to expand the array of educational opportunities within the region that are available to students who are deaf. The centers must provide technical assistance to institutions currently not serving students who are deaf to assist them to develop services and to institutions currently serving students who are deaf to assist them in improving existing programs. In carrying out the objectives of this priority, projects must distribute technical assistance services and resources equitably, taking into account population and geographic size, within each State in its targeted geographic region.

Each regional center must:

(a) Conduct an assessment to determine current technical assistance needs and priorities of postsecondary institutions related to recruiting; enrolling; retaining; instructing; addressing the varying communication needs and methods used by individuals who are deaf, including those from language minorities; and otherwise effectively serving students who are deaf;

(b) Provide consultation, in-service training, and planning and development Start Printed Page 52619assistance to appropriate staff at postsecondary education institutions to (1) enhance access to programs and accommodation of individuals who are deaf and (2) as needed, improve their basic skills before matriculating in a postsecondary education environment, and individuals who need job specific skill development training;

(c) Provide technical assistance on the responsibilities of postsecondary education institutions under Federal statutes, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, and the Americans with Disabilities Act;

(d) Cooperate with participating secondary and postsecondary educational institutions within the region in developing outreach strategies and disseminating information to individuals who are deaf to enhance their awareness of available postsecondary opportunities, both within and outside the region;

(e) Disseminate information about resources (e.g. financial, support services) available to students who are deaf and to postsecondary institutions to help them accommodate these students;

(f) Through development or acquisition, make training materials available and disseminate information on proven models, components of models, and other exemplary practices, including innovative technology, to assist administrators, faculty and staff in implementing effective and cost-effective service-delivery systems that foster integration of students who are deaf with other students;

(g) Encourage the use of consortia of postsecondary education institutions and other cooperative arrangements to provide services and assistance to students who are deaf, including coordination of postsecondary education options with existing public and private community services that may address the educational, remedial, support service, transitional, independent living, and employment needs of individuals who are deaf;

(h) Coordinate technical assistance and dissemination activities with relevant information clearinghouses and organizations such as the National Clearinghouse on Postsecondary Education for Individuals with Disabilities (HEATH), National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities, Secondary Education and Transition Technical Assistance Center, and Association of Higher Education and Disability;

(i) Evaluate the overall impact, effectiveness, and results of the postsecondary institutions within the region in accommodating students who are deaf;

(j) Work with the other three grantees under this program to operate a postsecondary education programs network to coordinate and collaborate on the development and establishment of needs-assessment activities, material development, technical assistance, outreach, information dissemination, and evaluation of the regional centers' activities for the purpose of avoiding overlap and duplication of efforts. Grantees must ensure that individuals who are deaf have information on postsecondary programs throughout the country, including information on the services they provide, and that information on proven models, components of models, and other exemplary practices, including innovative technology, is equally available in each of the four regions. This coordination must include carrying out collaborative activities and cross-regional initiatives, where appropriate; and

(k) Develop structured methods and processes for evaluating the impact and appropriateness of the assistance provided by the regional centers to staff at postsecondary education institutions related to enhancing access to programs and accommodating individuals who are deaf. In particular, consultation, in-service training, and planning and development should be evaluated.

Under this priority, we will fund four cooperative agreements, each with a project period of up to 60 months subject to the requirements of 34 CFR 75.253(a) for continuation awards.

In deciding whether to continue this project for the fourth and fifth years, we will consider the requirements of 34 CFR 75.253(a), and in addition—

(a) The recommendation of a review team consisting of three experts whom we select. The review team will conduct its review during the last half of the project's second year, including a two-day site visit to the grantee. The results of the review team's review may be included in that year's evaluation required under 34 CFR 75.590. Costs associated with the services to be performed by the review team must also be included in the project's budget for year two. These costs are estimated to be approximately $6,000;

(b) The timeliness and effectiveness with which all requirements of the negotiated cooperative agreement have been or are being met by the project; and

(c) The degree to which the projects are making a positive contribution to addressing the technical assistance needs of postsecondary institutions related to assisting them to increase and improve postsecondary opportunities for students who are deaf.

To ensure that all States benefit from these projects, we will support four projects that will be required to serve each State within one of the following geographic regions:

Northeast Region—Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Virgin Islands.

Southern Region—Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia.

Midwest Region—Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin.

Western Region—Alaska, American Samoa, Arizona, California, Colorado, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Northern Mariana Islands, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.

Competitive Preference: Within this absolute priority, we will give the following competitive preference under section 606 of IDEA and 34 CFR 75.105(c)(2)(i), to applications that are otherwise eligible for funding under this priority:

Up to ten (10) points based on the effectiveness of the applicant's strategies for employing and advancing in employment qualified individuals with disabilities in project activities as required under paragraph (a) of the “General Requirements” section of this notice. In determining the effectiveness of those strategies, we may consider the applicant's past success in pursuit of this goal.

Therefore, for purposes of this competitive preference, applicants can be awarded up to a total of 10 points in addition to those awarded under the published selection criteria for this priority. That is, an applicant meeting this competitive preference could earn a maximum total of 110 points.

Project Period: Up to 60 months.

Maximum Award: The maximum award amount is $1,000,000. Consistent with EDGAR 34 CFR 75.104(b), we will reject any application that proposes a project funding level for any year that exceeds the stated maximum award amount for that year. We will consider, and may fund, requests for additional funding as an addendum to an application to reflect the costs of reasonable accommodations necessary to allow individuals with disabilities to be employed on the project as personnel on project activities. Start Printed Page 52620

Page Limits: The maximum page limit for this priority is 50 double-spaced pages.

Note:

Applications must meet the required page limit standards that are described in the “General Requirements” section of this notice.

Absolute Priority 2—Student-Initiated Research Projects (84.324B)

This priority provides support for short-term (up to 12 months) postsecondary student-initiated research projects focusing on special education and related services for children with disabilities and early intervention services for infants and toddlers with disabilities, consistent with the purposes of the program, as described in Section 672 of the Act.

Projects must—

(a) Develop research skills in postsecondary students; and

(b) Include a principal investigator who serves as a mentor to the student researcher while the project is carried out by the student.

Project Period: Up to 12 months.

Maximum Award: The maximum award amount is $20,000. Consistent with EDGAR 34 CFR 75.104(b), we will reject any application that proposes a project funding level for any year that exceeds the stated maximum award amount for that year. We will consider, and may fund, requests for additional funding as an addendum to an application to reflect the costs of reasonable accommodations necessary to allow individuals with disabilities to be employed on the project as personnel on project activities.

Page Limits: The maximum page limit for this priority is 25 double-spaced pages.

Note:

Applications must meet the required page limit standards that are described in the “General Requirements” section of this notice.

Absolute Priority 3—Field-Initiated Research Projects (84.324C)

This priority provides support for a wide range of field-initiated research projects that support innovation, development, exchange, and use of advancements in knowledge and practice as described in Section 672 of the Act including the improvement of early intervention, instruction, and learning for infants, toddlers, and children with disabilities.

Projects must—

(a) Prepare their procedures, findings, and conclusions in a manner that informs other interested researchers and is useful for advancing professional practice or improving programs and services to infants, toddlers, and children with disabilities and their families; and

(b) Disseminate project procedures, findings, and conclusions to appropriate research institutes and technical assistance providers.

Invitational Priorities: Within absolute priority 3 for FY 2001, we are particularly interested in applications that meet one or more of the following invitational priorities.

However, under 34 CFR 75.105(c)(1) we do not give to an application that meets one or more of these invitational priorities a competitive or absolute preference over other applications.

(a) Projects to address the specific problems of over-identification and under-identification of children with disabilities. (See section 672(a)(3) of the Act).

(b) Projects to develop and implement effective strategies for addressing inappropriate behavior of students with disabilities in schools, including strategies to prevent children with emotional and behavioral problems from developing emotional disturbances that require the provision of special education and related services. (See section 672(a)(4) of the Act).

(c) Projects studying and promoting improved alignment and compatibility of regular and special education reforms concerned with curriculum and instruction, evaluation and accountability, and administrative procedures. (See section 672(b)(2)(D) of the Act).

(d) Projects that advance knowledge about the coordination of education with health and social services. (See section 672(b)(2)(G) of the Act).

Competitive Preference: Within this absolute priority, we will give the following competitive preference under section 606 of IDEA and 34 CFR 75.105(c)(2)(i), to applications that are otherwise eligible for funding under this priority:

Up to ten (10) points based on the effectiveness of the applicant's strategies for employing and advancing in employment qualified individuals with disabilities in project activities as required under paragraph (a) of the “General Requirements” section of this notice. In determining the effectiveness of those strategies, we may consider the applicant's past success in pursuit of this goal.

Therefore, within this competitive preference, applicants can be awarded up to a total of 10 points in addition to those awarded under the published selection criteria for this priority. That is, an applicant meeting this competitive preference could earn a maximum total of 110 points.

Project Period: The majority of projects will be funded for up to 36 months. Only in exceptional circumstances—such as research questions that require repeated measurement within a longitudinal design—will projects be funded for more than 36 months, up to a maximum of 60 months.

Maximum Award: The maximum award amount is $180,000. Consistent with EDGAR 34 CFR 75.104(b), we will reject any application that proposes a project funding level for any year that exceeds the stated maximum award amount for that year. We will consider, and may fund, requests for additional funding as an addendum to an application to reflect the costs of reasonable accommodations necessary to allow individuals with disabilities to be employed on the project as personnel on project activities.

Page Limits: The maximum page limit for this priority is 50 double-spaced pages.

Note:

Applications must meet the required page limit standards that are described in the “General Requirements” section of this notice.

Absolute Priority 4—Youth with Disabilities Leadership Development Project (84.324F)

Background: Recent legislation has increased the options and choices for postsecondary education, employment, and independent living. These include the Workforce Investment Act (WIA), including Title IV, which amended the Rehabilitation Act of 1973; the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA); and the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999.

A number of studies and reports have helped to document the difficulties youth with disabilities have transitioning from school to adult life. They report low levels of participation in postsecondary education and training programs, unemployment, underemployment, and dependence on public assistance programs. In addition, they indicate a number of issues that must be addressed in order for youth with disabilities to be more successful in achieving their goals for adult life. These include the need to (1) increase family and student involvement in transition planning; (2) increase access to work-based learning and contextual teaching; (3) improve participation in postsecondary education; (4) improve collaboration among multiple service systems; and (5) ensure better access to and utilization of health insurance and health care. Start Printed Page 52621

This priority represents a collaborative effort between the Department of Education—Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; the Social Security Administration; the Department of Labor; the National Council on Disability; the Department of Health and Human Services—Maternal and Child Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Administration on Developmental Disabilities; and the President's Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities. This group of Federal partners conducted annual National Leadership Conferences for Youth with Disabilities in fiscal years 1998, 1999, and 2000. These earlier conferences will help to inform the activities outlined in the priority including the requirement described in paragraph (g)(5).

Priority: The purpose of this priority is to support a project to advance and improve the knowledge base and the practice of youth and the professionals, parents, educators, employers, and other partners providing education, transition and related services to youth with disabilities consistent with the purposes of IDEA, Part D, Section 672. This will be accomplished by obtaining information on the perspectives of youth with disabilities regarding barriers to effective policy and practice for improving results for youth with disabilities and developing strategic actions for reducing those barriers.

The project funded under this priority must hold 5 annual National Leadership Conferences of Youth with Disabilities (NLCs) involving youth with disabilities ages 16 through 24. The project must:

(a) For each conference, include discussion topics related to—

(1) Equality of opportunity, full participation, and self-sufficiency;

(2) Disability history and culture, civil rights laws, and the ADA;

(3) Skills for effective leadership at State and local levels and mentoring;

(4) Self advocacy and self determination;

(5) Independent living; and

(6) Systems, such as education, vocational rehabilitation, workforce development, health, social security, housing, and transportation, including collaboration among these systems.

(b) Based on these discussions—

(1) Develop an update on the impact of barriers to successful adult life;

(2) Identify what works, such as promising practices; and

(3) Highlight actions that should be implemented at the national, State, and local levels as seen by youth with disabilities.

(c) Enhance the self-determination efforts of youth with disabilities.

(d) Be informed by transition research and what is currently known about promising practices.

(e) Involve youth with disabilities in—

(1) Ongoing follow-up activities designed to build on and enhance the leadership skills gained in the NLCs; and

(2) Planning and directing the Conferences.

(f) Document and disseminate information annually on the results of these Conferences. The project will be responsible for coordinating its dissemination efforts with other OSERS-funded technical assistance projects including the Secondary Education and Transition Technical Assistance Center.

(g) In collaboration with Federal partners, develop a process for selecting which youth with disabilities will be invited to participate in each annual Conference that—

(1) Includes at least one representative from each U.S. territory and State;

(2) Reflects the diverse cultural groups of our nation with a balance between males and females;

(3) Includes the participation of youth with a broad array of disabilities;

(4) Includes the participation of Federal partners in the selection process; and

(5) Provides for input from at least two NLC-experienced youth—youth that have served as past NLC representatives—who will participate actively and equally with others involved in the selection process. The youth must be provided training on the criteria used for reaching consensus on the selection of finalists.

(h) Design and carry out a strategic management plan, including project evaluation. This plan must be designed to provide information to guide necessary ongoing refinements to the structure and activities of the project that will improve its effectiveness. The plan must also include procedures for follow-up activities designed to measure the impact of NLC participation on experiences and outcomes for youth.

Under this priority, we will fund one award for a cooperative agreement with a project period of up to 60 months subject to the requirements of 34 CFR 75.253(a) for continuation awards.

In deciding whether to continue this project for the fourth and fifth years, we will consider the requirements of 34 CFR 75.253(a), and in addition—

(a) The recommendation of a review team consisting of three experts whom we select. The review team will conduct its review during the last half of the project's second year, including a two-day site visit to the grantee. The results of the review team's review may be included in that year's evaluation required under 34 CFR 75.590. Costs associated with the services to be performed by the review team must also be included in the project's budget for year two. These costs are estimated to be approximately $6,000;

(b) The timeliness and effectiveness with which all requirements of the negotiated cooperative agreement have been or are being met by the project; and

(c) The degree to which the project's design and methodology demonstrates the potential for advancing significant new knowledge.

Competitive Preference: Within this absolute priority, we will give the following competitive preference under section 606 of IDEA and 34 CFR 75.105(c)(2)(i), to applications that are otherwise eligible for funding under this priority:

Up to ten (10) points based on the effectiveness of the applicant's strategies for employing and advancing in employment qualified individuals with disabilities in project activities as required under paragraph (a) of the “General Requirements” section of this notice. In determining the effectiveness of those strategies, we may consider the applicant's past success in pursuit of this goal.

Therefore, for purposes of this competitive preference, applicants can be awarded up to a total of 10 points in addition to those awarded under the published selection criteria for this priority. That is, an applicant meeting this competitive preference could earn a maximum total of 110 points.

Project Period: Up to 60 months.

Maximum Award: The maximum award amount is $300,000. Consistent with EDGAR 34 CFR 75.104(b), we will reject any application that proposes a project funding level for any year that exceeds the stated maximum award amount for that year. We will consider, and may fund, requests for additional funding as an addendum to an application to reflect the costs of reasonable accommodations necessary to allow individuals with disabilities to be employed on the project as personnel on project activities.

Note:

Funding is contingent upon the availability of funds, including Federal interagency support for this project from the collaborating agencies mentioned in the background statement.

Page Limits: The maximum page limit for this priority is 50 double-spaced pages.

Note:

Applications must meet the required page limit standards that are described in the Start Printed Page 52622“General Requirements” section of this notice.

Absolute Priority 5—Model Demonstration Projects for Children with Disabilities (84.324M).

This priority supports model demonstration projects that develop, implement, evaluate, and disseminate new or improved approaches for providing early intervention, special education, and related services to infants, toddlers, and children with disabilities, and students with disabilities who are pursuing post-school employment, postsecondary education, or independent living goals. Projects supported under this priority are expected to be major contributors of models or components of models for service providers and for outreach projects funded under IDEA.

Requirements for all Demonstration Projects: A model demonstration project must—

(a) Develop and implement the model with specific components or strategies that are based on theory, research, or evaluation data;

(b) Determine the effectiveness of the model and its components or strategies by using multiple measures of results; and

(c) Product detailed procedures and materials that would enable others to replicate the model.

Federal financial participation for a project funded under this priority will not exceed 90 percent of the total annual costs of development, implementation, evaluation, and dissemination of the project (see Section 661(f)(2)(A) of IDEA).

In addition to the annual two-day Project Directors' meeting in Washington, DC mentioned in the “General Requirements” section of this notice, projects must budget for another annual meeting in Washington, DC to collaborate with the Federal project officer and the other projects funded under this priority, to share information and discuss model development, implementation, evaluation, and dissemination issues.

Competitive Preferences: Within this absolute priority, we will give the following competitive preference under section 606 of IDEA and 34 CFR 75.105(c)(2)(i), to applications that are otherwise eligible for funding under this priority:

Up to ten (10) points based on the effectiveness of the applicant's strategies for employing and advancing in employment qualified individuals with disabilities in project activities as required under paragraph (a) of the “General Requirements” section of this notice. In determining the effectiveness of those strategies, we may consider the applicant's past success in pursuit of this goal.

Therefore, for purposes of this competitive preference, applicants can be awarded up to a total of 10 points in addition to those awarded under the published selection criteria for this priority. That is, an applicant meeting this competitive preference could earn a maximum total of 110 points.

Project Period: Up to 48 months.

Maximum Award: The maximum award amount is $175,000. Consistent with EDGAR 34 CFR 75.104(b), we will reject any application that proposes a project funding level for any year that exceeds the stated maximum award amount for that year. We will consider, and may fund, requests for additional funding as an addendum to an application to reflect the costs of reasonable accommodations necessary to allow individuals with disabilities to be employed on the project as personnel on project activities.

Page Limit: The maximum page limit for this priority is 50 double-spaced pages.

Note:

Applications must meet the required page limit standards that are described in the “General Requirements” section of this notice.

Absolute Priority 6—Initial Career Awards (84.324N)

Background: There is a need to enable individuals in the initial phases of their careers to initiate and develop promising lines of research that would improve early intervention services for infants and toddlers, and special education and related services for children with disabilities. Support for research activities among individuals in the initial phases of their careers is intended to develop the capacity of the early intervention and special education research community. This priority would address the additional need to provide support for a broad range of field-initiated research projects—focusing on the special education and related services for children with disabilities and early intervention for infants and toddlers—consistent with the purpose of the program as described in section 672 of the Act.

Priority: We will establish an absolute priority for the purpose of awarding grants to eligible applicants for the support of individuals in the initial phases of their careers to initiate and develop promising lines of research consistent with the purposes of the program. For purposes of this priority, the initial phase of an individual's career is considered to be the first three years after completing a doctoral program and graduating (i.e., for fiscal year 2001 awards, projects may support individuals who completed a doctoral program and graduated no earlier than the 1997-1998 academic year).

At least 50 percent of the initial career researcher's time must be devoted to the project.

Projects must—

(a) Pursue a line of research that is developed either from theory or a conceptual framework. The line of research must establish directions for designing future studies extending beyond the support of this award. The project is not intended to represent all inquiry related to the particular theory or conceptual framework; rather, it is expected to initiate a new line or advance an existing one;

(b) Include, in design and conduct, sustained involvement with one or more nationally recognized experts having substantive or methodological knowledge and expertise relevant to the proposed research. The experts do not have to be at the same institution or agency at which the project is located, but the interaction with the project must be sufficient to develop the capacity of the initial career researcher to effectively pursue the research into mid-career activities;

(c) Prepare procedures, findings, and conclusions in a manner that informs other interested researchers and is useful for advancing professional practice or improving programs and services to infants, toddlers, and children with disabilities and their families; and

(d) Disseminate project procedures, findings, and conclusions to appropriate research institutes and technical assistance providers.

Invitational Priority: Within absolute priority 6 for FY 2001, we are particularly interested in applications that meet the following invitational priority. However, under 34 CFR 75.105(c)(1) we do not give to an application that meets the priority a competitive or absolute preference over other applications.

Projects that include in the design and conduct of the research project, a practicing teacher or clinician, in addition to the required involvement of nationally recognized experts.

Project Period: Up to 36 months.

Maximum Award: The maximum award amount is $75,000. Consistent with EDGAR 34 CFR 75.104(b), we will reject any application that proposes a project funding level for any year that exceeds the stated maximum award amount for that year. We will consider, and may fund, requests for additional Start Printed Page 52623funding as an addendum to an application to reflect the costs of reasonable accommodations necessary to allow individuals with disabilities to be employed on the project as personnel on project activities.

Page Limits: The maximum page limit for this priority is 30 double-spaced pages.

Note:

Applications must meet the required page limit standards that are described in the “General Requirements” section of this notice.

Absolute Priority 7—Outreach Projects for Children with Disabilities (84.324R)

This priority supports projects that will assist educational and other agencies in replicating proven models, components of models, and other exemplary practices that improve services for infants, toddlers, children with disabilities, and students with disabilities who are pursuing post-school employment, postsecondary education or independent living goals.

For the purposes of this priority, a “proven model” is a comprehensive description of a theory or system that, when applied, has been shown to be effective. “Exemplary practices” are effective strategies and methods used to deliver educational, related, or early intervention services. The models, components of models, or exemplary practices selected for outreach may include those developed for pre-service and in-service personnel preparation, and do not need to have been developed through projects funded under IDEA, or by the applicant.

Important elements of an outreach project include but are not limited to:

(a) Providing supporting data or other documentation in the application regarding the effectiveness of the model, components of a model, or exemplary practices selected for outreach;

(b) Selecting implementation sites in multiple regions within one State or multiple States and describing the criteria for their selection;

(c) Describing the expected costs, needed personnel, staff training, equipment, and sequence of implementation activities associated with the replication efforts, including a description of any modifications to the model or practice made by the sites;

(d) Including public awareness, product development and dissemination, training, and technical assistance activities as part of the implementation of the project; and

(e) Coordinating dissemination and replication activities conducted as part of outreach with dissemination projects, technical assistance providers, consumer and advocacy organizations, State and local educational agencies, and the lead agencies for Part C of IDEA, as appropriate.

Projects must prepare products from the project in formats that are useful for specific audiences, including parents, administrators, teachers, early intervention personnel, related services personnel, and individuals with disabilities. (See section 661(f)(2)(B) of IDEA).

Federal financial participation for a project funded under this priority will not exceed 90 percent of the total annual costs of development, operation, and evaluation of the project (see section 661(f)(2)(A) of IDEA).

In addition to the annual two-day Project Directors' meeting in Washington, D.C. mentioned in the “General Requirements” section of this notice, projects must budget annually for another annual meeting in Washington, D.C. to collaborate with the Federal project officer and the other projects funded under this priority, to share information and discuss project implementation issues.

Competitive Preference: Within this absolute priority, we will give the following competitive preference under section 606 of IDEA and 34 CFR 75.105(c)(2)(i), to applications that are otherwise eligible for funding under this priority:

Up to ten (10) points based on the effectiveness of the applicant's strategies for employing and advancing in employment qualified individuals with disabilities in project activities as required under paragraph (a) of the “General Requirements” section of this notice. In determining the effectiveness of those strategies, we may consider the applicant's past success in pursuit of this goal.

Therefore, for purposes of this competitive preference, applicants can be awarded up to a total of 10 points in addition to those awarded under the published selection criteria for this priority. That is, an applicant meeting this competitive preference could earn a maximum total of 110 points.

Project Period: Up to 36 months.

Maximum Award: The maximum award amount is $175,000. Consistent with EDGAR 34 CFR 75.104(b), we will reject any application that proposes a project funding level for any year that exceeds the stated maximum award amount for that year. We will consider, and may fund, requests for additional funding as an addendum to an application to reflect the costs of reasonable accommodations necessary to allow individuals with disabilities to be employed on the project as personnel on project activities.

Page Limits: The maximum page limit for this priority is 50 double-spaced pages.

Note:

Applications must meet the required page limit standards that are described in the “General Requirements” section of this notice.

Technology and Media Services for Individuals With Disabilities (CFDA 84.327)

Purpose of Program

The purpose of this program is to promote the development, demonstration, and utilization of technology and to support educational media activities designed to be of educational value to children with disabilities. This program also provides support for some captioning, video description, and cultural activities.

Applicable Regulations

(a) The Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) in 34 CFR parts 74, 75, 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 85, 86, 97, 98, and 99; (b) The selection criteria for the priorities under this program that are drawn from the EDGAR general selection criteria menu. The specific selection criteria for each priority are included in the funding application packet for the applicable competition.

Note:

The regulations in 34 CFR part 86 apply to institutions of higher education only.

Eligible Applicants

State and local educational agencies; institutions of higher education; other public agencies; private nonprofit organizations; outlying areas; freely associated States; Indian tribes or tribal organizations; and for-profit organizations.

Priority

Under section 687 of IDEA and 34 CFR 75.105(c)(3), we consider only applications that meet the following priority:

Absolute Priority 1—Steppingstones of Technology Innovation for Students With Disabilities (84.327A).

The purpose of this priority is to support projects that—

(a) Develop or select and describe a technology-based approach for achieving one or more of the following purposes for early intervention, preschool, elementary, middle school, or high school students with disabilities: (1) Improving the results of education or early intervention; (2) improving access to and participation in the general curriculum, or appropriate activities for preschool children; and (3) Start Printed Page 52624improving accountability and participation in educational reform. The technology-based approach must be an innovative combination of a new technology and additional materials and methodologies that enable the technology to achieve educational purposes for students with disabilities;

(b) Justify the approach on the basis of research or theory that supports the effectiveness of the technology-based approach for achieving one or more of the purposes presented in paragraph (a);

(c) Clearly identify and conduct work in ONE of the following phases:

(1) Phase 1—Development: Projects funded under Phase 1 must develop and refine a technology-based approach, and test its feasibility for use with students with disabilities. Activities may include development, adaptation, and refinement of technology, curriculum materials, or instructional methodologies. Activities must include formative evaluation. The primary product of Phase 1 should be a promising technology-based approach that is suitable for field-based evaluation of effectiveness.

(2) Phase 2—Research on Effectiveness: Projects funded under Phase 2 must select a promising technology-based approach that has been developed in a manner consistent with Phase 1, and subject the approach to rigorous field-based research and evaluation to determine effectiveness and feasibility in educational or early intervention settings. Approaches studied in Phase 2 may have been developed with previous funding under this priority or with funding from other sources. Products of Phase 2 include a further refinement and description of the technology-based approach, and sound evidence that, in a defined range of real world contexts, the approach can be effective in achieving one or more of the purposes presented in paragraph (a).

(3) Phase 3—Research on Implementation: Projects funded under Phase 3 must select a technology-based approach that has been evaluated for effectiveness and feasibility in a manner consistent with Phase 2, and must study the implementation of the approach in multiple, complex settings to acquire an improved understanding of the range of contexts in which the approach can be used effectively, and the factors that determine the effectiveness and sustainability of the approach in this range of contexts. Approaches studied in Phase 3 may have been developed and tested with previous funding under this priority or with funding from other sources. Factors to be studied in Phase 3 include factors related to the technology, materials, and methodologies that constitute the technology-based approach. Also to be studied in Phase 3 are contextual factors associated with students, teacher attitudes and skills, physical setting, curricular and instructional or early intervention approaches, resources, professional development, policy supports, etc. Phases 2 and 3 can be contrasted as follows: Phase 2 studies the effectiveness the approach can have, while Phase 3 studies the effectiveness the approach is likely to have in sustained use in a range of typical educational settings. The primary product of Phase 3 should be a set of research findings that can be used to guide dissemination and utilization of the technology-based approach;

(d) In addition to the annual two-day Project Directors' meeting in Washington, D.C. mentioned in the “General Requirements” section of this notice, budget for another annual trip to Washington, D.C. to collaborate with the Federal project officer and the other projects funded under this priority, and to share information and discuss findings and methods of dissemination; and

(e) Prepare products from the project in formats that are useful for specific audiences as appropriate, including parents, administrators, teachers, early intervention personnel, related services personnel, researchers, and individuals with disabilities.

Projects for Children from Birth to 3: We intend to fund at least two projects focusing on technology-based approaches for children with disabilities, ages birth to 3.

Competitive Preference: Within this absolute priority, we will give the following competitive preference under section 606 of IDEA and 34 CFR 75.105(c)(2)(i), to applications that are otherwise eligible for funding under this priority:

Up to ten (10) points based on the effectiveness of the applicant's strategies for employing and advancing in employment qualified individuals with disabilities in project activities as required under paragraph (a) of the “General Requirements” section of this notice. In determining the effectiveness of those strategies, we may consider the applicant's past success in pursuit of this goal.

Therefore, for purposes of this competitive preference, applicants can be awarded up to a total of 10 points in addition to those awarded under the published selection criteria for this priority. That is, an applicant meeting this competitive preference could earn a maximum total of 110 points.

Project Period: We intend to fund at least three projects in each phase. Projects funded under Phase 1 will be funded for up to 24 months. Projects funded under Phase 2 will be funded for up to 24 months. Projects funded under Phase 3 will be funded for up to 36 months. During the final year of projects funded under Phase 3, we will determine whether or not to fund an optional six-month period for additional dissemination activities.

Maximum Award: The maximum award amount is $200,000 for projects in Phases 1 and 2, and $300,000 for projects in Phase 3. Consistent with EDGAR 34 CFR 75.104(b), we will reject any application that proposes a project funding level for any year that exceeds the stated maximum award amount for that year. We will consider, and may fund, requests for additional funding as an addendum to an application to reflect the costs of reasonable accommodations necessary to allow individuals with disabilities to be employed on the project as personnel on project activities.

Page Limits: The maximum page limit for this priority is 50 double-spaced pages.

Note:

Applications must meet the required page limit standards that are described in the “General Requirements” section of this notice.

Absolute Priority 2—Accessible Media for Students with Visual Impairments and Print Disabilities (84.327K)

Background: According to the U.S. Department of Education's 1999 21st Annual Report to Congress, there were approximately 5.4 million students with disabilities aged 6 through 21 served by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) in school year 1997-1998, including 26,070 students who are blind or visually impaired. We currently support one cooperative agreement to provide textbooks and other educational materials in accessible formats by recording, producing, duplicating, and distributing tapes of printed textbooks. In addition, we will also support one cooperative agreement to apply new technology for producing and distributing educational materials. In an effort to continue to meet the needs of these special populations, we must continue to move forward and capitalize on advanced technology to serve visually impaired and other print disabled students in elementary, secondary, postsecondary and graduate schools.

Priority: The purpose of this priority is to promote the utilization of advanced technology to support the translation of printed educational media to alternative Start Printed Page 52625formats for use by students with visual impairments and print disabilities. This priority supports the distribution of free educational materials through mediums such as CD-ROMs, the Internet, and audio tapes, using technology such as electronic text and digital audio synchronization.

To be considered for funding under this priority, the project must—

(a) Handle requests for educational materials, from students who are visually or print disabled at all educational levels without charging for materials or memberships fees.

(b) Obtain statements of eligibility by disability for each requestor.

(c) Coordinate and collaborate with publishers, software developers, and manufacturers of accessible materials for individuals who are visually impaired or otherwise print disabled to utilize technology to allow access to textbooks and other educational materials via the Internet, CD-Roms, and audio tapes, using technology such as electronic text and digital audio synchronization.

(d) Apply new technology for producing and distributing educational materials in accessible formats for individuals who are blind or otherwise print disabled.

(e) Coordinate with disability and educational organizations, and government agencies to ensure effective coordination and nonduplication of effort.

(f) Ensure the project activities are conducted in compliance with section 121 of the Copyright Act, as amended.

(g) Ensure that publishers have the rights to copies of the materials distributed at no charge and rights to market those materials.

(h) To the extent that funds are not sufficient to meet the demand for free materials, place a priority on providing free materials that are not otherwise required to be provided by educational agencies or institutions.

(i) Identify outreach activities that will be conducted.

(j) Establish an advisory group consisting of parents of students who are visually impaired or print disabled, consumers who are visually impaired or print disabled, and schools or other institutions where accessible products are used to provide input on the impact of program activities and services and project goals and objectives.

Competitive Preference: Within this absolute priority, we will give the following competitive preference under section 606 of IDEA and 34 CFR 75.105(c)(2)(i), to applications that are otherwise eligible for funding under this priority:

Up to ten (10) points based on the effectiveness of the applicant's strategies for employing and advancing in employment qualified individuals with disabilities in project activities as required under paragraph (a) of the “General Requirements” section of this notice. In determining the effectiveness of those strategies, we may consider the applicant's past success in pursuit of this goal.

Therefore, for purposes of this competitive preference, applicants can be awarded up to a total of 10 points in addition to those awarded under the published selection criteria for this priority. That is, an applicant meeting this competitive preference could earn a maximum total of 110 points.

Project Period: Up to 36 months.

Maximum Award: The maximum award amount is $6,000,000. Consistent with EDGAR 34 CFR 75.104(b), we will reject any application that proposes a project funding level for any year that exceeds the stated maximum award amount for that year. We will consider, and may fund, requests for additional funding as an addendum to an application to reflect the costs of reasonable accommodations necessary to allow individuals with disabilities to be employed on the project as personnel on project activities.

Page Limits: The maximum page limit for this priority is 70 double-spaced pages.

Note:

Applications must meet the required page limit standards that are described in the “General Requirements” section of this notice.

SPECIAL EDUCATION—TRAINING AND INFORMATION FOR PARENTS OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES [CFDA No. 84.328]

Purpose of Program

The purpose of this program is to ensure that parents of children with disabilities receive training and information to help improve results for their children.

Eligible Applicants

Eligible applicants are local parent organizations. According to section 682(g), a parent organization is a private nonprofit organization (other than an institution of higher education) that:

(a) Has a board of directors—

(1) The parent and professional members of which are broadly representative of the population to be served;

(2) The majority of whom are parents of children with disabilities; and

(3) That includes individuals with disabilities and individuals working in the fields of special education, related services, and early intervention; or

(b) Has a membership that represents the interests of individuals with disabilities and has established a special governing committee meeting the requirements for a board of directors in paragraph (a) and has a memorandum of understanding between this special governing committee and the board of directors of the organization that clearly outlines the relationship between the board and the committee and the decision making responsibilities and authority of each.

According to section 683(c), local parent organizations are parent organizations that must meet one of the following criteria—

(a) Have a board of directors the majority of whom are from the community to be served; or

(b) Have, as part of their mission, serving the interests of individuals with disabilities from those community; and have a special governing committee to administer the project, a majority of the members of which are individuals from those community.

Examples of administrative responsibilities include controlling the use of the project funds, and hiring and managing project personnel.

Applicable Regulations

(a) The Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) in 34 CFR parts 74, 75, 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 85, 97, 98, and 99; and (b) The selection criteria for this priority that are drawn from the EDGAR general selection criteria menu. The specific selection criteria for this priority are included in the funding application packet for this competition.

Priority

Under sections 661(e)(2) and 683 of the Act, and 34 CFR 75.105(c)(3), we will give an absolute preference to applications that meet this absolute priority:

Absolute Priority—Community Parent Resource Centers (84.328C)

The purpose of this priority is to support local parent training and information centers that will help ensure that underserved parents of children with disabilities, including low-income parents, parents of children with limited English proficiency, and parents with disabilities, have the training and information they need to enable them to participate effectively in helping their children with disabilities to—

(a) Meet developmental goals and, to the maximum extent possible, those Start Printed Page 52626challenging standards that have been established for all children; and

(b) Be prepared to lead productive independent adult lives, to the maximum extent possible.

Each community parent training and information center supported under this priority must —

(a) Provide training and information that meets the training and information needs of parents of children with disabilities proposed to be served by the project;

(b) Assist parents to understand the availability of, and how to effectively use, procedural safeguards under Section 615 of the Act, including encouraging the use, and explaining the benefits, of alternative methods of dispute resolution, such as the mediation process described in the Act;

(c) Serve the parents of infants, toddlers, and children with the full range of disabilities by assisting parents to—

(1) Better understand the nature of their children's disabilities and their educational and developmental needs;

(2) Communicate effectively with personnel responsible for providing special education, early intervention, and related services;

(3) Participate in decision-making processes and the development of individualized education programs and individualized family service plans;

(4) Obtain appropriate information about the range of options, programs, services, and resources available to assist children with disabilities and their families;

(5) Understand the provisions of the Act for the education of, and the provision of early intervention services to, children with disabilities; and

(6) Participate in school reform activities;

(d) Contract with the State educational agencies, if the State elects to contract with the community parent resource centers, for the purpose of meeting with parents who choose not to use the mediation process to encourage the use and explain the benefits of mediation, consistent with sections 615(e)(2)(B) and (D) of the Act;

(e) In order to serve parents and families of children with the full range of disabilities, network with appropriate clearinghouses, including organizations conducting national dissemination activities under section 685(d) of the Act, and with other national, State, and local organizations and agencies, such as protection and advocacy agencies;

(f) Establish cooperative partnerships with the parent training and information centers funded under section 682 of the Act;

(g) Be designed to meet the specific needs of families who experience significant isolation from available sources of information and support; and

(h) Annually report to the Assistant Secretary on—

(1) The number of parents to whom it provided information and training in the most recently concluded fiscal year; and

(2) The effectiveness of strategies used to reach and serve parents, including underserved parents of children with disabilities.

We intend to fund a maximum of fifteen awards.

Competitive Preferences: Within this absolute priority, we will give competitive preference to applications under 34 CFR 75.105(c)(2)(i) that meet one or more of the following priorities:

(1) We will award 20 points to an application submitted by a local parent organization that has a board of directors, the majority of whom are parents of children with disabilities, from the community to be served.

(2) We will award 5 points to an application that proposes to provide services to one or more Empowerment Zones or Enterprise Communities that are designated within the areas served by projects. To meet this priority an applicant must indicate that it will:

(a)(i) Design a program that includes special activities focused on the unique needs of one or more Empowerment Zones or Enterprise Communities; or

(ii) Devote a substantial portion of program resources to providing services within, or meeting the needs of residents of these zones and communities.

(b) As appropriate, contribute to the strategic plan of the Empowerment Zones or Enterprise Communities and become an integral component of the Empowerment Zone or Enterprise Community activities.

A list of areas that have been selected as Empowerment Zones or Enterprise Communities is included in the application package.

(3) We will award up to five (5) points based on the effectiveness of the applicant's strategies for employing and advancing in employment qualified individuals with disabilities in project activities as required under paragraph (a) of the General Requirements section of this notice (Section 606 of IDEA). In determining the effectiveness of those strategies, we may consider the applicant's past success in pursuit of this goal.

Therefore, for purposes of these competitive preferences, applicants can be awarded up to a total of 30 points in addition to those awarded under the published selection criteria for this priority. That is, an applicant meeting all of these competitive preferences could earn a maximum total of 130 points.

Project Period: Up to 36 months.

Maximum Award: The maximum award amount is $100,000. Consistent with EDGAR 34 CFR 75.104(b), we will reject any application that proposes a project funding level for any year that exceeds the stated maximum award amount for that year. We will consider, and may fund, requests for additional funding as an addendum to an application to reflect the costs of reasonable accommodations necessary to allow individuals with disabilities to be employed on the project as personnel on project activities.

Page Limits: The maximum page limit for this priority is 30 double-spaced pages.

Note:

Applications must meet the required page limit standards that are described in the “General Requirements” section of this notice.

Special Education Studies and Evaluations [CFDA 84.329]

Purpose of Program

To assess progress in implementing IDEA, including State and local efforts to provide free appropriate public education to children with disabilities, and early intervention services to infants and toddlers with disabilities.

Applicable Regulatioins

(a) The Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) in 34 CFR parts 74, 75, 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 85, 86, 97, 98, and 99; and (b) The selection criteria for the priority under this program that are drawn from the EDGAR general selection menu. The specific selection criteria for this priority are included in the funding application packet for the applicable competition.

Note:

The regulations in 34 CFR part 86 apply to institutions of higher education only.

Eligible Applicants

State and local educational agencies; institutions of higher education; other public agencies; for-profit organizations; private nonprofit organizations; outlying areas; freely associated States; and Indian tribes or tribal organizations.

Priority

Under section 674 of IDEA and 34 CFR 75.105(c)(3), we consider only applications that meet the following priority: Start Printed Page 52627

Absolute Priority—National Early Intervention Longitudinal Study (NEILS) (CFDA 84.329E)

Background: In 1995, the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) determined that there was a critical need to discern the immediate and long-term effects of Part H, now called Part C, of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act on infants and toddlers and their families, as well as on service providers. That program, provides early intervention services for children under three years of age and their families. In order to obtain that information, OSEP funded a cooperative agreement with SRI International for SRI to conduct a longitudinal study of a cohort of entrants into Part C. The main study questions are as follows:

(a) Who are the children and families receiving early intervention services?

(b) What early intervention services do participating children and families receive and how are these services delivered?

(c) What outcomes do participating children and families experience?

(d) How do outcomes relate to variations in child and family characteristics and services provided?

The study will follow a group of more than 3,300 children between ages 0 through 2 at the time of recruitment (1997—1998) through the time that each child completes kindergarten. The sample is now approximately 3, 4 and 5 years of age. The original five-year grant is not long enough to follow all the children until they complete kindergarten.

Priority: We will establish an absolute priority for a project to continue the National Early Intervention Longitudinal Study (NEILS) until each of the children in that study has completed kindergarten. The project must analyze the data and present a plan for a future study to examine a new cohort of entrants into the Part C program. The project officer will provide the awarded project with a copy of the questionnaires to be used in the project. The project must:

(a) Plan for and direct the smooth transition of projected-related resources from SRI International;

(b) Compare and evaluate different patterns of child development related to long-term results for children and their families through longitudinal analyses;

(c) Assess the effects of socioeconomic, demographic and health-related variables on long-term developmental and behavioral characteristics of the children;

(d) Incorporate factors related to body structure, body function, personal functioning, and the interaction with the environment with these variables that could result in a disadvantage limiting or preventing the fulfillment of an age-appropriate role;

(e) Isolate and explain the long-term effects of intervention on children and their families; and

(f) Present a comprehensive plan for assessing a new cohort of infants and toddlers served under Part C.

In addition to the annual two-day Research Project Directors' meeting in Washington, D.C. mentioned in the “General Requirements” section of this notice, the project must budget for four additional annual meetings in Washington, D.C. for: (1) An Early Childhood Project Directors' Meeting; (2) a Part C Directors' meeting; and (3) an additional two meetings, to meet and collaborate with the project officer from the Office of Special Education programs (OSEP) and with representatives from other relevant OSEP funded projects.

Project Period: Under this award, we will make one award for a cooperative agreement with a project period of up to 60 months subject to the requirements of 34 CFR 75.253(a) for continuation awards.

Competitive Preference: Within this absolute priority, we will give the following competitive preference under section 606 of IDEA and 34 CFR 75.105(c)(2)(i), to applications that are otherwise eligible for funding under this priority:

Up to ten (10) points based on the effectiveness of the applicant's strategies for employing and advancing in employment qualified individuals with disabilities in project activities as required under paragraph (a) of the “General Requirements” section of this notice. In determining the effectiveness of those strategies, we may consider the applicant's past success in pursuit of this goal.

Therefore, for purposes of this competitive preference, applicants can be awarded up to a total of 10 points in addition to those awarded under the published selection criteria for this priority. That is, an applicant meeting this competitive preference could earn a maximum total of 110 points.

Maximum Award: The maximum award amount is $1,100,000 for fiscal year 2001, $1,200,000 for fiscal year 2002, $1,300,000 for fiscal year 2003, and $400,000 per year for fiscal years 2004 and 2005. Consistent with EDGAR 34 CFR 75.104(b), we will reject any application that proposes a project funding level for any year that exceeds the stated maximum award amount for that year. We will consider, and may fund, requests for additional funding as an addendum to an application to reflect the costs of reasonable accommodations necessary to allow individuals with disabilities to be employed on the project as personnel on project activities.

Page Limits: The maximum page limit for this priority is 70 double-spaced pages.

Note:

Applicants must meet the required page limits that are described in the “General Requirements” section of this notice.

For Applications Contact

Education Publications Center (ED Pubs), PO Box 1398, Jessup, Maryland 20794-1398. Telephone (toll free): 1-877-4ED-Pubs (1-877-433-7827). FAX: 301-470-1244. Individuals who use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) may call (toll free) 1-877-576-7734.

You may also contact Ed Pubs via its Web site (http://www.ed.gov/​pubs/​edpubs.html) or its E-mail address (edpubs@inet.ed.gov).

Start Further Info

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT

Grants and Contracts Services Team, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., room 3317, Switzer Building, Washington, DC 20202-2550. Telephone: (202) 260-9182.

If you use a TDD you may call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1-800-877-8339.

Individuals with disabilities may obtain this document in an alternate format (e.g., Braille, large print, audiotape, or computer diskette) on request to the contact persons listed in the preceding paragraph.

Individuals with disabilities may obtain a copy of the application package in an alternate format by contacting the Department as listed above. However, the Department is not able to reproduce in an alternate format the standard forms included in the application package.

Intergovernmental Review

All programs in this notice (except for the Research and Innovation to Improve Services and Results for Children with Disabilities Program) are subject to the requirements of Executive Order 12372 and the regulations in 34 CFR Part 79. The objective of the Executive order is to foster an intergovernmental partnership and a strengthened federalism by relying on processes developed by State and local governments for coordination and review of proposed Federal financial assistance.

In accordance with the order, we intend this document to provide early Start Printed Page 52628notification of the Department's specific plans and actions for those programs.

Individuals With Disabilities Education Act

[Application Notice for Fiscal Year 2001]

CFDA number and nameApplications availableApplication deadline dateDeadline for intergovernmental reviewMaximum award (per year)*Project periodPage limit**Estimated number of awards
84.324A Postsecondary Education Programs for Individuals who are Deaf09/06/0012/15/0002/14/01$1,000,000Up to 60 mos.504
84.324B Student Initiated Research Projects09/06/0002/09/0104/11/0120,000Up to12 mos.2512
84.324C Field Initiated Research Projects09/06/0001/05/0103/06/01180,000Up to 60 mos.***5014
84.324F Youth Leadership Development Project09/06/0010/13/0012/12/00300,000Up to 60 mos.501
84.324M Model Demonstration Projects for Children with Disabilities09/06/0012/15/0002/12/01175,000Up to 48 mos.5014
84.324N Initial Career Awards09/06/0010/27/0012/16/0075,000Up to 36 mos.304
84.324R Outreach Projects for Children with Disabilities09/06/0012/01/0001/31/01175,000Up to 36 mos.5014
84.327A Steppingstones of Technology Innovation for Students with Disabilities09/06/0012/08/0002/05/0111
Phase 1 and 2200,000Up to 24 mos.50
Phase 3300,000Up to 36 mos.50
84.327K Accessible Media for Students with Visual Impairments and Print Disabilities09/06/0010/13/0012/12/006,000,000Up to 36 mos.701
84.328C Community Parent Resource Centers09/06/0011/03/0001/02/01100,000Up to 36 mos.3015
84.329E National Early Intervention Longitudinal Study09/06/0010/13/0012/12/00Up to 60 mos.701
FY 20011,100,000
FY 20021,200,000
FY 20031,300,000
FY 2004400,000
FY 2005400,000
*Consistent with EDGAR 34 CFR 75.104(b), we will reject any application that proposes a project funding level for any year that exceeds the stated maximum award amount for that year. We will consider, and may fund, requests for additional funding as an addendum to an application to reflect the costs of reasonable accommodations necessary to allow individuals with disabilities to be employed on the project as personnel on project activities.
**Applicants must limit the Application Narrative, Part III of the Application, to the page limits noted above. Please refer to the “Page Limit” requirements and the page limit standards described in the “General Requirements” section included under each priority description. We will reject and will not consider an application that does not adhere to this requirement.
***The majority of projects will be funded for up to 36 months. Only in exceptional circumstances will projects be funded for more than 36 months, up to a maximum of 60 months.

Electronic Access to This Document

You may view this document, as well as all other Department of Education documents published in the Federal Register, in text or portable document format (PDF) on the internet at either of the following sites:

http://ocfo.ed.gov/​fedreg.htm

http://www.ed.gov/​news.html

To use the PDF you must have Adobe Acrobat Reader, which is available free at either of the previous sites. If you have questions about using the PDF, call the U.S. Government Printing Office (GPO), toll free, at 1-888-293-6498; or in the Washington, DC., area at (202) 512-1530.

Note:

The official version of this document is the document published in the Federal Register Free Internet access to the official edition of the Federal Register and the Code of Federal Regulations is available on GPO Access at: http://www.access.gpo/​nara/​index.html

Start Authority

Program Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1405, 1461, 1472, 1474, and 1487.

End Authority Start Signature

Dated: August 24, 2000.

Judith E. Heumann,

Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services.

End Signature End Further Info End Preamble

[FR Doc. 00-22060 Filed 8-28-00; 8:45 am]

BILLING CODE 4000-01-U