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Proposed Rule

Special Conditions: Boeing Model 777-200 Series Airplanes; Overhead Crew Rest Compartments

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Start Preamble

AGENCY:

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT.

ACTION:

Notice of proposed special conditions.

SUMMARY:

This action proposes special conditions for Boeing Model 777-200 series airplanes, modified by the Boeing Commercial Airplane Group, Wichita. The proposed modification consists of the installation of an overhead flightcrew rest (OFCR) and an overhead attendant rest (OAR). The applicable airworthiness regulations do not contain adequate or appropriate safety standards for these design features. These proposed special conditions contain the additional safety standards that the Administrator considers necessary to establish a level of safety equivalent to that established by the existing airworthiness standards.

DATES:

Comments must be received on or before October 24, 2001.

ADDRESSES:

Comments on this proposal may be mailed in duplicate to: Federal Aviation Administration, Transport Airplane Directorate, Attention: Rules Docket (ANM-113), Docket No. NM195, 1601 Lind Avenue SW., Renton, Washington, 98055-4056; or delivered in duplicate to the Transport Airplane Directorate at the above address. Comments must be marked: Docket No. NM195. Comments may be inspected in the Rules Docket weekdays, except Federal holidays, between 7:30 a.m. and 4 p.m.

Start Further Info

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:

Jayson Claar, FAA, Airframe/Cabin Safety Branch, ANM-115, Transport Standards Staff, Transport Airplane Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service, 1601 Lind Avenue SW., Renton, Washington, 98055-4056; telephone (425) 227-2194; facsimile (425) 227-1320.

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SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Comments Invited

Interested persons are invited to participate in the making of these proposed special conditions by submitting such written data, views, or arguments, as they may desire. Communications should identify the regulatory docket or notice number and be submitted in duplicate to the address specified above. All communications received on or before the closing date for comments will be considered by the Administrator. The proposals described in this action may be changed in light of the comments received. All comments received will be available in the Rules Docket for examination by interested persons, both before and after the closing date for comments. A report summarizing each substantive public contact with FAA personnel concerning this rulemaking will be filed in the docket. Persons wishing the FAA to acknowledge receipt of their comments submitted in response to this action must include with those comments a self-addressed, stamped postcard on which the following statement is made: “Comments to NM195.” The postcard will be date stamped and returned to the commenter.

Background

On September 18, 2000, the Boeing Commercial Airplane Group (BCAG)—Wichita Division Designated Alteration Station (DAS) applied for a Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) from the Wichita Aircraft Certification Office (ACO). The STC is to install an overhead flightcrew rest (OFCR) and an overhead attendant rest (OAR) on Boeing Model 777-200 series airplanes. The OFCR compartment adjacent to door one will include a maximum of two private berths and two seats. Occupancy of the OFCR will be limited to a maximum of four occupants. The OAR compartment, adjacent to door three, will include a combination of private berths and seats for a maximum of twelve occupants. Occupancy of the OAR will be limited to a maximum of twelve occupants. Follow-on designs may locate the OAR at either door three, or door four depending on the Model 777-200 airplane and option(s) selected by the customer.

Both crew rests, OFCR and OAR, will be accessed from the main deck by stairs. In addition, an emergency hatch which opens directly into the cabin area will be provided for each compartment. A smoke detection system, an oxygen system, and occupant amenities will also be provided. These compartments will only be occupied in flight, not during taxi, takeoff, or landing.

The Boeing Model 777-200 series airplanes are large twin engine airplanes with various passenger capacities and ranges depending upon airplane configuration, and currently do not incorporate OFCR and OAR compartments in production. While the installation of a crew rest compartment is not a new concept for large transport category airplanes, each crew rest compartment has unique features based on design, location, and use on the airplane. Crew rest compartments have been installed and certified in the main passenger area, above the main passenger area and below the passenger cabin area within the cargo compartment of the Boeing Model 777-200/-300 series airplanes. Also, overhead crew rest compartments have been installed on the Boeing Model 747 series airplanes.

The FAA has previously issued special conditions, which contain the additional safety standards that must be met for the overhead crew rests on Boeing Model 747 series airplanes. The FAA certified the lower lobe attendant rest on the Boeing Model 777-200 series airplanes by equivalent level of safety finding to the requirements of 25.819. In addition, the FAA recently issued Special Conditions No. 25-169-SC, dated December 1, 2000, for 777-200 series airplanes for overhead crew rest to support a STC for Flight Structures Inc (FSI) of Arlington, Washington. The Flight Structures, Inc. (FSI) Special Conditions No. 25-169-SC were amended on May 2, 2001.

These proposed special conditions contain the additional safety standards that the Administrator considers necessary to establish a level of safety equivalent to that established by the existing airworthiness standards. Certification requirements for pilot “sleeping quarters” per the requirements of 121.485 are not addressed in these special conditions. The applicant must work directly with the Aircraft Evaluation Group (AEG) with regard to the adequacy of onboard sleeping quarters/facilities for compliance with 121.485(a), 121.523(b) and 135.269(b)(5). The AEG is responsible for making this finding.

Type Certification Basis

Under the provisions of 21.101, Boeing must show that the Model 777-Start Printed Page 48837200 series airplanes, as changed, continue to meet the applicable provisions of the regulations incorporated by reference in Type Certificate No. T00001SE or the applicable regulations in effect on the date of application for the change. The regulations incorporated by reference in the type certificate are commonly referred to as the “original type certification basis.” The regulations incorporated by reference in Type Certificate No. T00001SE for the Boeing Model 777-200 series airplanes include 14 CFR part 25, as amended by Amendments 25-1 through 25-82. The U.S. type certification basis for the Boeing Model 777-200 series airplanes is established in accordance with 14 CFR 21.17 and 21.29 and the type certification application date. The type certification basis is listed in Type Certificate Data Sheet No. T00001SE.

If the Administrator finds that the applicable airworthiness regulations (i.e., part 25) do not contain adequate or appropriate safety standards for the Boeing Model 777-200 airplanes because of a novel or unusual design feature, special conditions are prescribed under the provisions of § 21.16.

In addition to the applicable airworthiness regulations and special conditions, the Boeing Model 777-200 series airplanes must comply with the fuel vent and exhaust emission requirements of 14 CFR part 34 and the noise certification requirements of 14 CFR part 36.

Special conditions, as appropriate, are issued in accordance with § 11.19, after public notice, as required by § 11.38, and become part of the type certification basis in accordance with § 21.101(b)(2).

Special conditions are initially applicable to the model for which they are issued. Should the applicant apply for a supplemental type certificate to modify any other model included on the same type certificate to incorporate the same novel or unusual design feature, the special conditions would also apply to the other model under the provisions of § 21.101(a)(1).

Novel or Unusual Design Features

While the installation of a crew rest compartment is not a new concept for large transport category airplanes, each compartment design has unique features by virtue of its design, location, and use on the airplane. Previously, crew rest compartments have been evaluated that are installed within the main passenger compartment area of the Boeing Model 777-200 and Model 777-300 series airplanes and the overhead area of the passenger compartment of the 777-200. Other crew rest compartments have been installed below the passenger cabin area, adjacent to the cargo compartment. Similar overhead crew rest compartments have also been installed on the Boeing Model 747 airplane. The interfaces of the modification are evaluated within the interior and assessed in accordance with the certification basis of the airplane. However, part 25 does not provide all the requirements for crew rest compartments within the overhead area of the passenger compartment. Further, these special conditions do not negate the need to address other applicable part 25 regulations.

Due to the novel or unusual features associated with the installation of this crew rest compartment, special conditions are considered necessary to provide a level of safety equal to that established by the airworthiness regulations incorporated by reference in the type certificate.

Discussion of the Proposed Special Conditions

In general, the requirements listed in these proposed special conditions are similar to those previously approved in earlier certification programs, such as for the Boeing Model 777-200 series airplanes and Boeing Model 747 overhead crew rest compartments. These proposed special conditions establish seating, communication, lighting, personal safety, and evacuation requirements for the overhead crew rest compartment. In addition, passenger information signs, supplemental oxygen, and a seat or berth for each occupant of the crew rest compartment would be required. These items are necessary because of turbulence and/or decompression. When applicable, the proposed requirements parallel the existing requirements for a lower deck service compartment and provide an equivalent level of safety to that provided for main deck occupants.

Proposed Special Condition No. 1

Seats and berths must be certified to the maximum flight loads. Due to the location and configuration of the crew rest compartment, it is proposed that occupancy during taxi, takeoff, and landing would be prohibited, and occupancy limited to crewmembers during flight. Occupancy would be limited to four in the overhead flightcrew rest (OFCR) or the combined total of approved seats and berths in the OFCR, whichever is less. Occupancy would be limited to twelve in the overhead attendant rest (OAR), or the combined total of approved seats and berths in the OAR, whichever is less. Appropriate placards are proposed to prohibit passenger access, access by crewmembers not trained in evacuation procedures, smoking and hazardous quantities of flammable fluids, explosives or other dangerous cargo. Of special note is the intended meaning of the phrase “hazardous quantities” used above. The intent of this term is to continue to accept a practice that permits trained crewmembers to carry baggage containing minute quantities of flammable fluids (e.g., finger nail polish) that would pose no threat to the airplane or its occupants. This wording is consistent with the existing wording of §§ 25.831(d), 25.855 (h)(2), 25.857 (b)(2), (c)(3) & (e)(4) and 25.1353(c)(3). Requirements for door access and locking and the installation of ashtrays are proposed.

Proposed Special Condition No. 2

To preclude occupants from being trapped in the crew rest compartment in the event of an emergency there must be at least two emergency evacuation routes which could be used by each occupant of the crew rest compartment to rapidly evacuate to the main cabin. These two routes must be sufficiently separated to minimize the possibility of an event rendering both routes inoperative. The main entry route meeting the appropriate requirements may be utilized as one of the emergency evacuation routes or alternatively two other emergency routes must be provided. The previous special conditions allowed only one of the evacuation routes to terminate in a main aisle, cross aisle or galley complex. The idea was to ensure that one of the two routes would be clear of moving occupants under most foreseeable circumstances.

The following provides clarification in the intent of special condition 2b concerning the utility of the egress routes. There are three issues that should be considered. First, occupied passenger seats are not considered an impediment to the use of an egress route, (e.g., egress route drops into one row of seats via a hatch), provided that the seated occupants do not inhibit the opening of the egress route (e.g., hatch).

The second issue is that the proposed special conditions would allow a second route to utilize areas where normal movement of passengers occurs if it is demonstrated that the passengers would not impede egress to the main deck. If the egress means (hatch in this design) opens into a main aisle, cross aisle, or galley complex to an extent that it contacts a standing 95th percentile male, the contact should only momentarily interrupt the opening of Start Printed Page 48838the egress hatch. The interruption to the egress means can be considered momentary if the egress means will continue to open normally once the person has moved out of the way.

The third consideration is with respect to a passenger in the cabin re-closing the escape hatch, effectively preventing the occupants of the crew rest area from using the escape route. The escape hatch should be provided with a means to prevent it from being inadvertently re-closed by a passenger on the main deck, but allow the escape hatch to be restowed by the crew prior to landing.

Training requirements for the occupants of the crew rest area are included in the proposal.

Proposed Special Condition No. 3

It is proposed that each evacuation route must be designed and procedures specified to allow for removal of an incapacitated person from the crew rest compartment to the main deck. Words have been added for clarification for evacuation routes having stairways. Additional assistants to evacuate an incapacitated person may ascend up to one half the elevation change from the main deck to the overhead compartment, or to the first landing, whichever is lower. The revised FSI special conditions did provide guidance information regarding limiting the number of assistants but did not provide their position and/or stance on the stairs or landing. The proposal also allows that a single row of seats may be emptied for the purposes of demonstrating evacuation of an incapacitated person, where the escape route is over seats.

Proposed Special Condition No. 4

Exit signs, placards for evacuation routes, illumination for signs, placards and door handles are proposed. The proposal allows for exit signs with a reduced background area to be used. These reduced background area signs have been allowed under previous equivalent levels of safety for small transport executive jets. A proviso has been proposed that would limit the material surrounding the sign to be light in color to more closely match and enhance the illuminated background of the sign that has been reduced in area (letter size stays the same).

Proposed Special Condition No. 5

To prevent the occupants from being isolated in a dark area due to loss of the crew rest compartment lighting, an emergency lighting system, which is activated under the same conditions as the main deck emergency lighting system, is proposed.

Proposed Special Condition No. 6

It is proposed that a two-way voice communications and public address speaker(s) would be required to alert the occupants to an in-flight emergency. Also, a system to alert the occupants of the crew rest compartment in the event of decompression and to don oxygen masks is proposed.

Proposed Special Condition No. 7

Emergency alarm means or use of the public address system or crew interphone system to inform occupants of the OFCR or OAR of an emergency situation is proposed. Power duration to the emergency alarm after certain failures is proposed.

Proposed Special Condition No. 8

Proposed Special Condition No. 8 requires a means, readily detectable by seated or standing occupants of the crew rest compartment, which indicates when seat belts should be fastened. The requirement for visibility of the sign by standing occupants may be met by a general area sign that is visible to occupants standing in the main floor area or corridor of the crew rest area. It would not be essential that the sign be visible from every possible location in the crew rest area; however, the sign should not be remotely located or located where it may be easily obscured.

Proposed Special Condition No. 9

Since the overhead crew rest compartment is remotely located from the passenger cabin, a hand-held fire extinguisher, protective breathing equipment and a flashlight are proposed tools specified to fight a fire should a fire occur.

Proposed Special Condition No. 10

Since the overhead crew rest compartment is remotely located from the main passenger cabin and will not always be occupied, a smoke detection system and appropriate warnings are proposed. The smoke detection system must be capable of detecting a fire in each area of the compartment created by the installation of a curtain or door.

Proposed Special Condition No. 11

It is proposed that the crew rest compartment be designed such that fires within the compartment can be controlled without having to enter the compartment; or, the design of the access provisions must allow crew equipped for fire fighting to have unrestricted access to the compartment. The time for a crewmember on the main deck to react to the fire alarm, to don the fire fighting equipment, and to gain access must not exceed the time for the crew rest compartment to become smoke filled, making it difficult to locate the fire source.

Proposed Special Condition No. 12

This proposed special condition requirement concerning fires within the compartment was developed for, and applied to, Boeing Model 777-200 and Model 777-300 series airplanes lower lobe crew rest compartments. It was not applied to the overhead crew rest compartment in earlier certification programs such as the Boeing Model 747. The Model 747 special conditions were issued before the new flammability requirements were developed. This requirement originated from a concern that a fire in an unoccupied crew rest compartment could spread into the passenger compartment, or affect other vital systems, before it could be extinguished. The proposed special conditions would require either the installation of a manually activated fire containment system that is accessible from outside the crew rest compartment, or a demonstration that the crew could satisfactorily perform the function of extinguishing a fire under the prescribed conditions. A manually activated built-in fire extinguishing system would be required only if a crewmember could not successfully locate and extinguish the fire during a demonstration where the crewmember is responding to the alarm.

The crew rest compartment smoke or fire detection and fire suppression systems (including airflow management features which prevent hazardous quantities of smoke or fire extinguishing agent from entering any other compartment occupied by crewmembers or passengers) is considered complex in terms of paragraph 6d of Advisory Circular (AC) 25.1309-1A, “System Design and Analysis.” In addition, the FAA considers failure of the crew rest compartment fire protection system (i.e., smoke or fire detection and fire suppression systems) in conjunction with a crew rest fire to be a catastrophic event. Based on the “Depth of Analysis Flowchart” shown in Figure 2 of AC 25.1309-1A, the depth of analysis should include both qualitative and quantitative assessments (reference paragraphs 8d, 9, and 10 of AC 25.1309-1A). In addition, it should be noted that hazardous quantities of flammable fluids, explosives, or other dangerous cargo are prohibited from being carried in the crew rest area, a prohibition addressed in proposed Special Condition No. 1(a)(5). Start Printed Page 48839

The requirements to enable crewmember(s) quick entry to the crew rest compartment and to locate a fire source inherently places limits on the amount of baggage that may be carried and the size of the crew rest area. The crew rest area is limited to stowage of crew personal luggage and it is not intended to be used for the stowage of cargo or passenger baggage. The design of such a system to include cargo or passenger baggage would require additional requirements to ensure safe operation.

Proposed Special Condition No. 13

Oxygen equipment and a supplemental oxygen deployment warning are proposed.

Proposed Special Condition No. 14

For a divided crew rest compartment, requirements are proposed to address supplemental oxygen equipment and deployment means, signs, placards, curtains, doors, emergency illumination, alarms, seat belt fasten signals, and evacuation routes.

Proposed Special Condition No. 15

Alleviations to the requirements above for lavatories or other small areas within a crew rest area are proposed.

Proposed Special Condition No. 16

When waste disposal receptacle are installed, fire extinguishers are proposed.

Proposed Special Condition No. 17

The materials in the crew rest compartment must meet the flammability requirements of § 25.853(a), and the mattresses must meet the fire blocking requirements of § 25.853(c).

These proposed special conditions provide the regulatory requirements necessary for certification of this modification. Other special conditions may be developed, as needed, based on further FAA review and discussions with the applicant, manufacturer, and civil aviation authorities.

Applicability

As discussed above, these special conditions are applicable to Boeing Model 777-200 series airplanes. Should Boeing Commercial Airplane Group, Wichita Division Designated Alternation Station, apply at a later date for a supplemental type certificate to modify any other model included on Type Certificate No. T00001SE to incorporate the same novel or unusual design feature, the special conditions would apply to that model as well under the provisions of § 21.101(a)(1).

Certification of the Boeing Model 777-200 series airplanes, modified by Boeing Commercial Airplane Group, Wichita Division Designated Alternation Station, is currently scheduled for mid-November 2001. The substance of these special conditions has been subject to the notice and public comment procedure previously. For this reason, and because a delay would significantly affect the applicant's installation of the system and certification of the airplane, the public comment period is being shortened to 30 days.

Conclusion

This action affects only certain novel or unusual design features on Boeing Model 777-200 series airplanes. It is not a rule of general applicability, and it affects only the applicant who applied to the FAA for approval of these features on the airplane.

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List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 25

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The authority citation for these special conditions is as follows:

Start Authority

Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701, 44702, 44704.

End Authority

The Proposed Special Conditions

Accordingly, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) proposes the following special conditions as part of the type certification basis for Boeing Model 777-200 series airplanes, as modified by Boeing Commercial Airplane Group, Wichita Division Designated Alteration Station, with overhead crew rest compartments, OFCR and/or OAR compartments.

1. Occupancy of the overhead crew rest compartment is limited to the total number of installed bunks and seats in each compartment. There must be an approved seat or berth able to withstand the maximum flight loads when occupied for each occupant permitted in the crew rest compartment. The maximum occupancy is four in the OFCR and 12 for the OAR.

(a) There must be appropriate placards, inside and outside to indicate:

(1) The maximum number of occupants allowed,

(2) That occupancy is restricted to crewmembers that are trained in the evacuation procedures for the overhead crew rest compartment,

(3) That occupancy is prohibited during taxi, take-off and landing, and

(4) That smoking is prohibited in the crew rest compartment.

(5) That hazardous quantities of flammable fluids, explosives, or other dangerous cargo are prohibited from the crew rest compartment.

(b) There must be at least one ashtray on the inside and outside of any entrance to the crew rest compartment.

(c) There must be a means to prevent passengers from entering the compartment in the event of an emergency or when no flight attendant is present.

(d) There must be a means for any door installed between the crew rest compartment and passenger cabin to be capable of being quickly opened from inside the compartment, even when crowding occurs at each side of the door.

(e) For all doors installed, there must be a means to preclude anyone from being trapped inside the compartment. If a locking mechanism is installed, it must be capable of being unlocked from the outside without the aid of special tools. The lock must not prevent opening from the inside of the compartment at any time.

2. There must be at least two emergency evacuation routes, which could be used by each occupant of the crew rest compartment to rapidly evacuate to the main cabin. In addition—

(a) The routes must be located with sufficient separation within the compartment, and between the evacuation routes, to minimize the possibility of an event rendering both routes inoperative.

(b) The routes must be designed to minimize the possibility of blockage, which might result from fire, mechanical or structural failure, or persons standing below or against the escape route. One of two evacuation routes should not be located where, during times in which occupancy is allowed, normal movement by passengers occurs (i.e. main aisle, cross aisle or galley complex) that would impede egress of the crew rest compartment. If an evacuation route utilizes an area where normal movement of passengers occurs, it must be demonstrated that passengers would not impede egress to the main deck. If there is low headroom at or near the evacuation route, provisions must be made to prevent or to protect occupants (of the crew rest area) from head injury. The use of evacuation routes must not be dependent on any powered device. If the evacuation path is over an area where there are passenger seats, a maximum of one row of passengers may be displaced from their seats temporarily during the evacuation process. If the evacuation procedure involves the evacuee stepping on seats, the seats must not be damaged to the extent that they would not be acceptable Start Printed Page 48840for occupancy during an emergency landing.

(c) Emergency evacuation procedures and the emergency evacuation of incapacitated occupant procedures must be established and transmitted to the operator for incorporation into their training programs and appropriate operational manuals. If the evacuation path is over an area where there are passenger seats, a maximum of one row of passengers may be displaced from their seats temporarily during the evacuation process.

(d) There must be a limitation in the Airplane Flight Manual or other suitable means requiring that crewmembers be trained in the use of evacuation routes.

3. There must be a means for the evacuation of an incapacitated person (representative of a ninety-fifth percentile male) from the crew rest compartment to the passenger cabin floor.

(a) The evacuation must be demonstrated for all evacuation routes. A flight attendant or other crewmember (a total of one assistant within the crew rest area) may provide assistance in the evacuation. Additional assistance may be provided by up to three persons in the main passenger compartment. These additional assistants must be standing on the floor while providing assistance, except that for evacuation routes having stairways, the additional assistants may ascend up to one half the elevation change from the main deck to the overhead compartment, or to the first landing, whichever is lower.

(b) Procedures for the evacuation of an incapacitated person from the crew rest compartment must be established.

4. The following signs and placards must be provided in the crew rest compartment:

(a) At least one exit sign, located near each exit, meeting the requirements of § 25.812(b)(1)(i), except that a sign of reduced background area with no less than 5.3 square inches (excluding the letters) may be utilized, provided that it is installed such that the material surrounding the exit sign is light in color (e.g. white, cream, light beige). If the material surrounding the exit sign is not light in color, a sign with a minimum of a one inch wide background border around the letters would also be acceptable.

(b) An appropriate placard defining the location and the operating instructions for each evacuation route.

(c) Placards must be readable from a distance of 30 inches under emergency lighting conditions.

(d) The exit handles and evacuation path operating instruction placards must be illuminated to at least 160 microlamberts under emergency lighting conditions.

5. There must be a means in the event of failure of the airplane's main power system, or of the normal crew rest compartment lighting system, for emergency illumination to be automatically provided for the crew rest compartment.

(a) This emergency illumination must be independent of the main lighting system.

(b) The sources of general cabin illumination may be common to both the emergency and the main lighting systems if the power supply to the emergency lighting system is independent of the power supply to the main lighting system.

(c) The illumination level must be sufficient for the occupants of the crew rest compartment to locate and transfer to the main passenger cabin floor by means of each evacuation route.

6. There must be means for two-way voice communications between the crewmembers on the flight deck and the occupants of the crew rest compartment. There must also be two-way communications between the occupants of the crew rest compartment and each flight attendant station required to have a public address system microphone per § 25.1423(g) in the passenger cabin.

7. There must be a means for manual activation of an aural emergency alarm system, audible during normal and emergency conditions, to enable crewmembers on the flight deck and at each pair of required floor level emergency exits to alert occupants of the crew rest compartment of an emergency situation. Use of a public address or crew interphone system would be acceptable, providing an adequate means of differentiating between normal and emergency communications is incorporated. The system must be powered in flight, after the shutdown or failure of all engines and auxiliary power units, or the disconnection or failure of all power sources dependent on their continued operation, for a period of at least ten minutes.

8. There must be a means, readily detectable by seated or standing occupants of the crew rest compartment, which indicates when seat belts should be fastened. In the event there are no seats, at least one means must be provided to cover anticipated turbulence. Seat belt type restraints must be provided for berths and must be compatible for the sleeping attitude during cruise conditions. There must be a placard on each berth requiring that seat belts must be fastened when occupied. If compliance with any of the other requirements of these special conditions is predicated on specific head location, there must be a placard identifying the head position.

9. The following equipment must be provided in the crew rest compartment:

(a) At least one approved hand-held fire extinguisher appropriate for the kinds of fires likely to occur;

(b) One protective breathing equipment device approved to Technical Standard Order (TSO)-C116 or equivalent, suitable for fire fighting; and

(c) One flashlight.

10. A smoke detection system (or systems) must be provided that monitors each area within the crew rest including those areas partitioned by curtains. Flight tests must be conducted to show compliance with this requirement. Each system (or systems) must provide:

(a) A visual indication to the flight deck within one minute after the start of a fire;

(b) An aural warning in the crew rest compartment; and

(c) A warning in the main passenger cabin. This warning must be readily detectable by a flight attendant, taking into consideration the positioning of flight attendants throughout the main passenger compartment during various phases of flight.

11. The crew rest compartment must be designed such that fires within the compartment can be controlled without a crewmember having to enter the compartment, or the design of the access provisions must allow crewmembers equipped for firefighting to have unrestricted access to the compartment. The time for a crewmember on the main deck to react to the fire alarm, to don the fire fighting equipment, and to gain access must not exceed the time for the compartment to become smoke-filled, making it difficult to locate the fire source.

12. There must be a means provided to exclude hazardous quantities of smoke or extinguishing agent originating in the crew rest compartment from entering any other compartment occupied by crewmembers or passengers. The means must include the time periods during the evacuation of the crew rest compartment and, if applicable, when accessing the crew rest compartment to manually fight a fire. Smoke entering any other compartment occupied by crewmembers or passengers must dissipate within five minutes after closing the access to the crew rest compartment. Flight tests must be conducted to show compliance with this requirement. Start Printed Page 48841

If a built-in fire extinguishing system is used in lieu of manual fire fighting, then the fire extinguishing system must be designed so that no hazardous quantities of extinguishing agent will enter other compartments occupied by passengers or crew; the system must have adequate capacity to suppress any fire occurring in the crew rest compartment, considering the fire threat, volume of the compartment and the ventilation rate.

13. There must be a supplemental oxygen system equivalent to that provided for main deck passengers for each seat and berth in the crew rest compartment. The system must provide an aural and visual warning to warn the occupants of the crew rest compartment to don oxygen masks in the event of decompression. The warning must activate before the cabin pressure altitude exceeds 15,000 feet. The aural warning must sound continuously until a reset push button in the crew rest compartment is depressed.

14. The following requirements apply to a crew rest compartment that is divided into several sections by the installation of curtains or partitions:

(a) To compensate for sleeping occupants, there must be an aural alert that can be heard in each section of the crew rest compartment that accompanies automatic presentation of supplemental oxygen masks. A minimum of two supplemental oxygen masks are required in each section whether or not seats or berths are installed in each section. There must also be a means by which the oxygen masks can be manually deployed from the flight deck.

(b) A placard is required adjacent to each curtain that visually divides or separates, for privacy purposes, the overhead crew rest compartment into small sections. The placard must require that the curtain(s) remain open when the private section it creates is unoccupied. The vestibule section adjacent to the stairway is not considered a private area and, therefore, does not require a placard.

(c) For each crew rest section created by the installation of a curtain, the following requirements of these special conditions must be met with the curtain open or closed:

(1) No smoking placard (Special Condition No. 1),

(2) Emergency illumination (Special Condition No. 5),

(3) Emergency alarm system (Special Condition No. 7),

(4) Seat belt fasten signal (Special Condition No. 8), and

(5) The smoke or fire detection system (Special Condition No. 10).

(d) Overhead crew rest compartments visually divided to the extent that evacuation could be affected must have exit signs that direct occupants to the primary stairway exit. The exit signs must be provided in each separate section of the crew rest compartment, and must meet the requirements of 25.812(b)(1)(i).

(e) Sections within an overhead crew rest compartment that are created by the installation of a rigid partition with a door physically separating the sections, the following requirements of these special conditions must be met with the door open or closed:

(1) There must be a secondary evacuation route from each section to the main deck, or alternatively, it must be shown that any door between the sections has been designed to preclude anyone from being trapped inside the compartment.

(2) Any door between the sections must be shown to be openable when crowded against, even when crowding occurs at each side of the door.

(3) There may be no more than one door between any seat or berth and the primary stairway exit.

(4) There must be exit signs in each section meeting the requirements of 25.812(b)(1)(i) that direct occupants to the primary stairway exit. An exit sign with reduced background area as described in Special Condition No. 4(a) may be used to meet this requirement.

(f) For each smaller section within the main crew rest compartment created by the installation of a partition with a door, the following requirements of these special conditions must be met with the door open or closed:

(1) No smoking placards (Special Condition No. 1),

(2) Emergency illumination (Special Condition No. 5),

(3) Two-way voice communication (Special Condition No. 6),

(4) Emergency alarm system (Special Condition No. 7),

(5) Seat belt fasten signal (Special Condition No. 8),

(6) Emergency fire fighting and protective equipment (Special Condition No. 9), and

(7) Smoke or fire detection system (Special Condition No. 10).

15. The requirements of two-way voice communication with the flight deck and provisions for emergency firefighting and protective equipment are not applicable to lavatories or other small areas that are not intended to be occupied for extended periods of time.

16. Where a waste disposal receptacle is fitted, it must be equipped with an automatic fire extinguisher that meets the performance requirements of 25.854(b).

17. Materials (including finishes or decorative surfaces applied to the materials) must comply with the flammability requirements of 25.853(a), as amended by Amendment 25-83. Mattresses must comply with the flammability requirements of 25.853(c), as amended by Amendment 25-83.

Start Signature

Issued in Renton, Washington on September 17, 2001.

Ali Bahrami,

Acting Manager, Transport Airplane Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service.

End Signature End Supplemental Information

[FR Doc. 01-23785 Filed 9-21-01; 8:45 am]

BILLING CODE 4910-13-P