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National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Pesticide Active Ingredient Production

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Information about this document as published in the Federal Register.

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AGENCY:

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

ACTION:

Direct final rule; amendment.

SUMMARY:

We are taking direct final action to amend the national emission standards for hazardous air pollutants (NESHAP) for Pesticide Active Ingredient (PAI) Production. This amendment will extend the compliance date of the PAI Production NESHAP as currently promulgated by 18 months. Under the promulgated rule, the compliance date is June 23, 2002. With this action, existing sources will be required to comply with the rule by December 23, 2003.

DATES:

This direct final rule will be effective May 21, 2002 without further notice, unless the EPA receives adverse comments by April 22, 2002. If we receive any adverse comments on the amendment, we will publish a timely withdrawal of this direct final rule in the Federal Register indicating that the amendment in this rule will not take effect.

ADDRESSES:

Comments. By U.S. Postal Service, send comments (in duplicate if possible) to: Air and Radiation Docket and Information Center (6102), Attention Docket Number A-95-20, U.S. EPA, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20460. In person or by courier, deliver comments (in duplicate if possible) to: Air and Radiation Docket and Information Center (6102), Attention Docket Number A-95-20, U.S. EPA, 401 M Street, SW., Washington, DC 20460. A separate copy of each public comment must also be sent to the contact person listed in FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT.

Docket. Docket No. A-95-20 contains supporting information used in developing the PAI Production NESHAP. The docket is located at the U.S. EPA, 401 M Street, SW., Washington, DC 20460 in Room M-1500, Waterside Mall (ground floor), and may be inspected from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding legal holidays.

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FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:

Mr. Randy McDonald, Organic Chemicals Group, Emission Standards Division (C504-04), U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711, telephone number (919) 541-5402, electronic mail address mcdonald.randy@epa.gov.

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SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Comments. Comments and data may be submitted by electronic mail (e-mail) to: a-and-r-docket@epa.gov. Electronic comments must be submitted as an ASCII file to avoid the use of special characters and encryption problems and will also be accepted on disks in WordPerfect. All comments and data submitted in electronic form must note the docket number A-95-20. No confidential business information (CBI) should be submitted by e-mail. Electronic comments may be filed online at many Federal Depository Libraries.

Commenters wishing to submit proprietary information for consideration must clearly distinguish such information from other comments and clearly label it as CBI. Send submissions containing such proprietary information directly to the following address, and not to the public docket, to ensure that proprietary information is not inadvertently placed in the docket: Attention: Mr. Randy McDonald, c/o OAQPS Document Control Officer (C404-02), U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. The EPA will disclose information identified as CBI only to the extent allowed by the procedures set forth in 40 CFR part 2. If no claim of confidentiality accompanies a submission when it is received by EPA, the information may be made available to the public without further notice to the commenter.

Docket. The docket is an organized and complete file of all the information considered by the EPA in the development of this rulemaking. The docket is a dynamic file because material is added throughout the rulemaking process. The docketing system is intended to allow members of the public and industries involved to readily identify and locate documents so that they can effectively participate in the rulemaking process. Along with the proposed and promulgated standards and their preambles, the contents of the docket will serve as the record in the case of judicial review. (See section 307(d)(7)(A) of the Clean Air Act (CAA).) The regulatory text and other materials related to this rulemaking are available for review in the docket or copies may be mailed on request from the Air Docket by calling (202) 260-7548. A reasonable fee may be charged for copying docket materials.

Worldwide Web (WWW). In addition to being available in the docket, an electronic copy of this action will also be available through the WWW. Following signature, a copy of this action will be posted on the EPA's Technology Transfer Network (TTN) policy and guidance page for newly proposed or promulgated rules http://www.epa.gov/​ttn/​oarpg. The TTN at EPA's web site provides information and technology exchange in various areas of air pollution control. If more information regarding the TTN is needed, call the TTN HELP line at (919) 541-5384.

Regulated Entities. The regulated category and entities affected by this action include:

CategoryNAICS codesSIC codesExamples of regulated entities
IndustryTypically, 325199 and 325320Typically, 2869 and 2879Producers of pesticide active ingredients that contain organic compounds that are used in herbicides, insecticides, or fungicides. Producers of any integral intermediate used in onsite production of an active ingredient used in herbicides, insecticides, or fungicides.

This table is not intended to be exhaustive, but rather provides a guide for readers likely to be interested in the revisions to the regulation affected by this action. To determine whether your facility, company, business, organization, etc., is regulated by this action, you should carefully examine all of the applicability criteria in 40 CFR part 63, subpart MMM. If you have questions regarding the applicability of the amendment to a particular entity, consult the person listed in the preceding FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT section.

Judicial Review. Under section 307(b)(1) of the CAA, judicial review of this direct final rule is available only by Start Printed Page 13509filing a petition for review in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia by May 21, 2002. Under section 307(d)(7)(B) of the CAA, only an objection to this rule that was raised with reasonable specificity during the period for public comment can be raised during judicial review.

I. Why Are We Amending the Rule?

Today's action is necessary to extend the compliance deadline of the PAI Production NESHAP pending review and approval of a proposed Settlement Agreement between EPA and the American Crop Protection Association (ACPA) and BASF Corporation and promulgation of rule amendments described in that Settlement Agreement. The ACPA and BASF, as well as the American Coke and Coal Chemicals Institute and Eastman Chemical Company, filed petitions for judicial review of the PAI Production NESHAP promulgated on June 23, 1999 (64 FR 33550). On January 18, 2002, EPA entered into a Settlement Agreement with ACPA and BASF, resolving petitioners' litigation. Notice of that Agreement was published in the Federal Register pursuant to the requirements of CAA section 113(g) on February 4, 2002 (67 FR 5116). The Agreement calls for EPA to propose a number of amendments to the PAI Production NESHAP.

Upon final approval of the Settlement Agreement, EPA will publish a notice of proposed rulemaking with the agreed upon amendments to the PAI Production NESHAP in the Federal Register.

Today's direct final rulemaking extends the compliance date for existing sources from June 23, 2002 to December 23, 2003. We believe this extension reasonably allows sources time to assess the compliance impacts of proposed Settlement Agreement and the agreed upon rule amendments included in that Settlement Agreement. While we believe the 18-month extension of the compliance date will be sufficient for all sources to come into compliance with the amendments to be proposed, should a source be unable to meet that compliance date because of the need to install controls that cannot be installed by that date, that source may request an extension of up to 1 year in accordance with 40 CFR 63.1364(a)(2).

II. What Amendment Are We Making to the Rule Today?

Today's action extends the compliance date by 18 months. Under the promulgated PAI Production NESHAP, existing affected sources would be required to be in compliance by June 23, 2002. With today's action, existing sources must be in compliance by December 23, 2003.

III. Why Are We Publishing the Amendment as a Direct Final Rule?

We are taking separate direct final action on the compliance date extension in order to ensure that this change can be completed before the current June 23, 2002 compliance deadline for existing sources. We believe this 18-month extension is a noncontroversial change because it provides a reasonable extension to allow sources to assess the compliance impacts of the agreed upon rule amendments included in the Settlement Agreement. As a result, we anticipate no adverse comments.

If we receive an adverse comment on this action, we will publish a timely notice before the effective date of this amendment indicating that the rule is being withdrawn. In the “Proposed Rules” section of this Federal Register, we are publishing a separate document that will serve as the proposal for the amendment in the event that we receive an adverse comment. We will respond to all public comments in a subsequent final rule based on the proposed rule. We will not institute a second comment period on the subsequent final rule. Any parties interested in commenting must do so at this time.

IV. What Are the Administrative Requirements for This Direct Final Rule?

A. Executive Order 12866, Regulatory Planning and Review

Under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993), EPA must determine whether the regulatory action is “significant” and therefore subject to Office of Management and Budget (OMB) review and the requirements of the Executive Order. The Executive Order defines “significant regulatory action” as one that is likely to result in a rule that may:

(1) Have an annual effect on the economy of $100 million or more or adversely affect in a material way the economy, a sector of the economy, productivity, competition, jobs, the environment, public health or safety, or State, local, or tribal governments or communities;

(2) create a serious inconsistency or otherwise interfere with an action taken or planned by another agency;

(3) materially alter the budgetary impact of entitlements, grants, user fees, or loan programs, or the rights and obligations of recipients thereof; or

(4) raise novel legal or policy issues arising out of legal mandates, the President's priorities, or the principles set forth in the Executive Order.

It has been determined that this rule amendment is a not a “significant regulatory action” under the terms of Executive Order 12866 and is therefore not subject to OMB review.

B. Executive Order 13132, Federalism

Executive Order 13132 (64 FR 43255, August 10, 1999) requires EPA to develop an accountable process to ensure “meaningful and timely input by State and local officials in the development of regulatory policies that have federalism implications.” “Policies that have federalism implications” is defined in the Executive Order to include regulations that have “substantial direct effects on the States, on the relationship between the national government and the States, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government.”

This direct final rule amendment does not have federalism implications. It will not have substantial direct effects on the States, on the relationship between the national government and the States, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government, as specified in Executive Order 13132, because State and local governments do not own or operate any sources that would be subject to the PAI Production NESHAP. Thus, Executive Order 13132 does not apply to this direct final rule amendment.

C. Executive Order 13175, Consultation and Coordination With Indian Tribal Governments

Executive Order 13175, entitled “Consultation and Coordination with Indian Tribal Governments” (65 FR 67249, November 9, 2000), requires EPA to develop an accountable process to ensure “meaningful and timely input by tribal officials in the development of regulatory policies that have tribal implications.”

The final rule does not have tribal implications, as specified in Executive Order 13175. Thus, Executive Order 13175 does not apply to the rule.

D. Executive Order 13045, Protection of Children From Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks

Executive Order 13045 (62 FR 19885, April 23, 1997) applies to any rule that: (1) Is determined to be “economically significant” as defined under Executive Order 12866, and (2) concerns an environmental health or safety risk that EPA has reason to believe may have a disproportionate effect on children. If Start Printed Page 13510the regulatory action meets both criteria, EPA must evaluate the environmental health or safety effects of the planned rule on children, and explain why the planned regulation is preferable to other potentially effective and reasonably feasible alternatives considered by EPA.

The EPA interprets Executive Order 13045 as applying only to those regulatory actions that are based on health or safety risks, such that the analysis required under section 5-501 of the Executive Order has the potential to influence the regulation. This rule amendment is not subject to Executive Order 13045 because it is based on technology performance, not health or safety risks. Furthermore, this rule amendment has been determined not to be “economically significant” as defined under Executive Order 12866.

E. Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995

Title II of the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (UMRA), Public Law 104-4, establishes requirements for Federal agencies to assess the effects of their regulatory actions on State, local, and tribal governments and the private sector. Under section 202 of the UMRA, EPA generally must prepare a written statement, including a cost-benefit analysis, for proposed and final rules with “Federal mandates” that may result in expenditures by State, local, and tribal governments, in the aggregate, or by the private sector, of $100 million or more in any 1 year. Before promulgating an EPA rule for which a written statement is needed, section 205 of the UMRA generally requires EPA to identify and consider a reasonable number of regulatory alternatives and adopt the least costly, most cost-effective, or least burdensome alternative that achieves the objectives of the rule. The provisions of section 205 do not apply when they are inconsistent with applicable law. Moreover, section 205 allows EPA to adopt an alternative other than the least costly, most cost-effective, or least burdensome alternative if the Administrator publishes with the final rule an explanation why that alternative was not adopted. Before EPA establishes any regulatory requirements that may significantly or uniquely affect small governments, including tribal governments, it must have developed under section 203 of the UMRA a small government agency plan. The plan must provide for notifying potentially affected small governments, enabling officials of affected small governments to have meaningful and timely input in the development of EPA regulatory proposals with significant Federal intergovernmental mandates, and informing, educating, and advising small governments on compliance with the regulatory requirements.

The EPA has determined that this rule amendment does not contain a Federal mandate that may result in expenditures of $100 million or more for State, local, or tribal governments, in the aggregate, or the private sector in any 1 year. For existing sources, the total annual cost of the PAI Production NESHAP has been estimated to be approximately $39.4 million (64 FR 33559, June 23, 1999). Today's amendment does not add new requirements that would increase this cost. Thus, this rule amendment is not subject to the requirements of sections 202 and 205 of the UMRA. In addition, EPA has determined that this rule amendment contains no regulatory requirements that might significantly or uniquely affect small governments because it contains no requirements that apply to such governments or impose obligations upon them. Therefore, this rule amendment is not subject to the requirements of section 203 of the UMRA.

F. Regulatory Flexibility Act (RFA), as Amended by the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act of 1996 (SBREFA), 5 U.S.C. 601 et seq.

The RFA generally requires an agency to prepare a regulatory flexibility analysis of any rule subject to notice and comment rulemaking requirements under the Administrative Procedure Act or any other statute unless the agency certifies that the rule will not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities. Small entities include small businesses, small organizations, and small governmental jurisdictions. For purposes of assessing the impacts of this direct final rule amendment on small entities, a small entity is defined as: (1) A small business in the North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) code 325320 that has as many as 500 employees; (2) a small business in NAICS code 325199 that has as many as 1,000 employees; (3) a small governmental jurisdiction that is a government of a city, county, town, school district or special district with a population of less than 50,000; and (4) a small organization that is any not-for-profit enterprise which is independently owned and operated and is not dominant in its field.

After considering the economic impacts of today's amendment on small entities, I certify that this action will not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities. In determining whether a rule has a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities, the impact of concern is any significant adverse economic impact on small entities, since the primary purpose of the regulatory flexibility analyses is to identify and address regulatory alternatives “which minimize any significant economic impact on small entities” (5 U.S.C. 603 and 604). Thus, an agency may conclude that a rule will not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities if the rule relieves regulatory burden, or otherwise has a positive economic effect on all of the small entities subject to the rule. Today's amendment imposes no additional regulatory requirements on owners or operators of affected sources. The EPA has determined that it is not necessary to prepare a regulatory flexibility analysis in connection with this direct final rule amendment.

G. Paperwork Reduction Act

The OMB has approved the information collection requirements contained in the 1999 PAI Production NESHAP under the provisions of the Paperwork Reduction Act, 44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq., and has assigned OMB control No. 2060-0370. An Information Collection Request (ICR) document has been prepared by EPA (ICR No. 1807.01), and a copy may be obtained from Sandy Farmer by mail at U.S. EPA, Office of Environmental Information, Collection Strategies Division (2822), 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington DC 20460, by email at farmer.sandy@epa.gov, or by calling (202) 260-2740.

The amendment contained in this direct final rule will have no impact on the information collection burden estimates made previously. Consequently, the ICR has not been revised.

H. National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act of 1995

As noted in the proposed rule, section 12(d) of the National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act of 1995 (NTTAA), Public Law 104-113, section 12(d) (15 U.S.C. 272 note), directs EPA to use voluntary consensus standards in its regulatory activities, unless to do so would be inconsistent with applicable law or otherwise impractical. Voluntary consensus standards are technical standards (e.g., materials specifications, test methods, sampling procedures, and business practices) developed or adopted by voluntary consensus standards bodies. The NTTAA directs EPA to provide Congress, through OMB, explanations when the Agency decides Start Printed Page 13511not to use available and applicable voluntary consensus standards.

Today's action does not involve technical standards. Therefore, EPA did not consider the use of any voluntary consensus standards.

I. Congressional Review Act

The Congressional Review Act, 5 U.S.C. 801, et seq., as added by the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act of 1996, generally provides that before a rule may take effect, the agency adopting the rule must submit a rule report, which includes a copy of the rule, to each House of the Congress and to the Comptroller General of the United States. The EPA will submit a report containing this rule amendment and other required information to the U.S. Senate, the U.S. House of Representatives, and the Comptroller General of the United States prior to publication of this rule amendment in the Federal Register. A major rule cannot take effect until 60 days after it is published in the Federal Register. This action is not a “major rule” as defined by 5 U.S.C. 804(2).

J. Executive Order 13211, Actions Concerning Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution or Use

This direct final rule amendment is not subject to Executive Order 13211, “Actions Concerning Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use” (66 FR 28355, May 22, 2001) because it is not a significant regulatory action under Executive Order 12866.

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List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 63

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Dated: March 19, 2002.

Christine Todd Whitman,

Administrator.

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For the reasons set out in the preamble, title 40, chapter I, part 63 of the Code of Federal Regulations is amended as follows:

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PART 63—[AMENDED]

1. The authority citation for part 63 continues to read as follows:

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Authority: 42 U.S.C. 7401, et seq.

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Subpart MMM—National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Pesticide Active Ingredient Production

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2. Section 63.1364 is amended by revising paragraph (a)(1) as follows:

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Compliance dates.

(a) Compliance dates for existing sources. (1) An owner or operator of an existing affected source must comply with the provisions in this subpart by December 23, 2003.

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[FR Doc. 02-6975 Filed 3-21-02; 8:45 am]

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