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Determination of Nonattainment as of November 15, 1996, and Reclassification of the St. Louis Ozone Nonattainment Area; States of Missouri and Illinois

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AGENCY:

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

ACTION:

Final rule.

SUMMARY:

This rule finalizes and makes effective EPA's finding that the St. Louis ozone nonattainment area (hereinafter referred to as the St. Louis area) failed to attain the 1-hour ozone national ambient air quality standard (NAAQS or standard) by November 15, 1996, the attainment date for moderate nonattainment areas set forth in the Clean Air Act (CAA or Act). As a result of this finding, the St. Louis area is reclassified from a moderate to a serious 1-hour ozone nonattainment area by operation of law, effective as of the date of publication. In addition, EPA is establishing a schedule for Missouri and Illinois to submit State Implementation Plan (SIP) revisions addressing the CAA's pollution control requirements for serious ozone nonattainment areas within 12 months of the effective date of this rule, and is establishing November 15, 2004, as the date by which the St. Louis area must attain the ozone NAAQS.

EFFECTIVE DATE:

This rule is effective January 30, 2003.

ADDRESSES:

Relevant documents for this rule are available for inspection at the Environmental Protection Agency, Region 7, Air Planning and Development Branch, 901 North 5th Street, Kansas City, Kansas 66101; or the Environmental Protection Agency, Region 5, Regulation Development Section, Air Programs Branch (AR-18J), 77 West Jackson Boulevard, Chicago, Illinois 60604; interested persons wanting to examine these documents should make an appointment with the appropriate office at least 24 hours in advance.

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FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:

Tony Petruska, Region 7, (913) 551-7637, (petruska.anthony@epa.gov), or Edward Doty, Region 5, (312) 886-6057 (doty.edward@epa.gov).

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SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Table of Contents

What Is the Background for this Action?

What Are the National Ambient Air Quality Standards?

What Is the NAAQS for Ozone?

What Is a SIP?

What Is the St. Louis Ozone Nonattainment Area?

What Does This Action Do?

What Is the New Attainment Date for the St. Louis Area?

When Must Missouri and Illinois Submit SIP Revisions Fulfilling the Requirements for Serious Ozone Nonattainment Areas?

What Is the Effective Date of the Reclassification to a Serious Nonattainment Area?

Statutory and Executive Order Reviews

What Is the Background for This Action?

On November 25, 2002, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit (Court) issued a decision in the case of the Sierra Club and Missouri Coalition for the Environment v. EPA, 311 F. 3d 853 (7th Cir. 2002). In this decision, the Court vacated a June 26, 2001, rule which extended the St. Louis area's attainment date, and remanded to EPA for entry of a final rule that reclassifies the St. Louis area as a serious nonattainment area. This rule reclassifies the St. Louis area as a serious nonattainment area in accordance with the Court's Order. The reclassification is based on a finding that the area did not attain the 1-hour ozone standard by November 15, 1996, the statutory attainment date for moderate areas. The finding is based on monitored data for the 1994 through 1996 ozone seasons. As explained in more detail below, EPA originally proposed to find that the area failed to attain the ozone standard by November 15, 1996, and to reclassify the area to serious nonattainment in a proposed rulemaking published March 18, 1999 (64 FR 13384). EPA finalized the finding and reclassification in a rulemaking published March 19, 2001 (66 FR 15578), and withdrew that final rulemaking prior to its effective date in the June 26, 2001, rulemaking vacated by the Court. In response to the Court's order, EPA is reinstating the finding of nonattainment and notice of reclassification, effective today, and to reflect the new effective date, is reinstating the schedule for Missouri and Illinois to submit SIP revisions to meet the new serious area requirements.

In a separate rulemaking, EPA is proposing to redesignate the St. Louis area to attainment with the 1-hour ozone standard. The proposal is based, in part, on three years of complete, quality-assured, ambient air monitoring data for the 2000 through 2002 ozone seasons which EPA believes shows that the area has now attained the 1-hour ozone NAAQS. Redesignation to attainment would eliminate the need for the states of Missouri and Illinois to submit SIP revisions addressing the CAA's pollution control requirements for serious ozone nonattainment areas. However, should the St. Louis area not be redesignated to attainment, the states of Missouri and Illinois will continue to be required to submit the serious area SIP revisions within one year as specified in this rule.

What Are the National Ambient Air Quality Standards?

Since the CAA's inception in 1970, EPA has set NAAQS for six common air pollutants: carbon monoxide, lead, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, particulate matter, and sulfur dioxide. The CAA requires that these standards be set at levels that protect public health and welfare with an adequate margin of safety. These standards present state and local governments with the air quality levels they must meet to achieve clean air. Also, these standards allow the American people to assess whether or not the air quality in their communities is healthful.

What Is the NAAQS for Ozone?

The NAAQS for ozone is expressed in two forms which are referred to as the 1-hour and 8-hour standards. Table 1 summarizes the ozone standards.

Table 1.—Summary of Ozone Standards

StandardValueTypeMethod of compliance
1-hour0.12 ppmPrimary and SecondaryMust not be exceeded, on average, more than one day per year over any three-year period at any monitor within an area.
8-hour annual0.08 ppmPrimary and SecondaryThe average of the fourth highest daily maximum 8-hour average ozone concentration measured at each monitor over any three-year period.
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(Primary standards are designed to protect public health and secondary standards are designed to protect public welfare and the environment.)

The 1-hour ozone standard of 0.12 parts per million (ppm) was promulgated in 1979. The 1-hour ozone standard continues to apply to the St. Louis area, and it is the classification of the St. Louis area with respect to the 1-hour ozone standard that is addressed in this document.

What Is a SIP?

Section 110 of the CAA requires states to develop air pollution regulations and control strategies to ensure that state air quality meet the NAAQS established by EPA. These ambient standards are established under section 109 of the CAA, and they currently address six criteria pollutants: Carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, lead, particulate matter, and sulfur dioxide.

Each state must submit these regulations and control strategies to us for approval and incorporation into the Federally-enforceable SIP.

Each Federally-approved SIP protects air quality primarily by addressing air pollution at its point of origin. These SIPs can be extensive. They may contain state regulations or other enforceable documents and supporting information such as emission inventories, monitoring networks, and modeling demonstrations.

What Is the St. Louis Ozone Nonattainment Area?

The St. Louis ozone nonattainment area is an interstate area which includes Madison, Monroe, and St. Clair Counties in Illinois; and Franklin, Jefferson, St. Charles, and St. Louis Counties and the City of St. Louis in Missouri.

Under section 107(d)(1)(C) of the CAA, each ozone area designated nonattainment for the 1-hour ozone standard prior to enactment of the 1990 CAA Amendments, such as the St. Louis area, was designated nonattainment by operation of law upon enactment of the 1990 Amendments. In addition, under section 181(a) of the Act, each area designated nonattainment under section 107(d) was classified as “marginal,” “moderate,” “serious,” “severe,” or “extreme,” depending on the severity of the area's air quality problem. The design value for an area, i.e., the highest of the fourth highest 1-hour daily maximums in a given three-year period, characterizes the severity of the air quality problem. Table 2 provides the design value ranges for each nonattainment classification. Ozone nonattainment areas with design values between 0.138 and 0.160 ppm, such as the St. Louis area (which had a design value of 0.156 ppm in 1989), were classified as moderate. These nonattainment designations and classifications were initially codified in 40 CFR part 81 (see 56 FR 56694, November 6, 1991).

Table 2.—Ozone Nonattainment Classifications

Area classDesign value (ppm)Attainment
Marginal0.121 up to 0.138November 15, 1993.
Moderate0.138 up to 0.160November 15, 1996.
Serious0.160 up to 0.180November 15, 1999.
Severe0.180 up to 0.280November 15, 2005.
Extreme0.280 and aboveNovember 15, 2010.

In addition, under section 182(b)(1)(A) of the CAA, states containing areas that were classified as moderate nonattainment were required to submit SIPs to provide for certain air pollution controls, to show progress toward attainment of the ozone standard through incremental emissions reductions, and to provide for attainment of the ozone standard as expeditiously as practicable, but no later than November 15, 1996. SIP requirements for moderate areas are listed primarily in section 182(b) of the CAA.

What Does This Action Do?

On March 18, 1999, EPA proposed (64 FR 13384) its finding that the St. Louis area did not attain the 1-hour ozone NAAQS by November 15, 1996, as required by the CAA. The proposed finding was based on 1994-1996 air quality data which indicated the area's air quality violated the standard and the area did not qualify for an attainment date extension under the provisions of section 181(a)(5).[1] Under the CAA, the effect of a final finding that an area has not attained the 1-hour ozone standard by the attainment date is that the area is reclassified to a higher classification (commonly referred to as a “bump up” of the area).

Although the area was not eligible for an attainment date extension under section 181(a)(5), the March 18, 1999, proposal included a notice of the St. Louis area's potential eligibility for an attainment date extension, pursuant to EPA's July 16, 1998, “Guidance on Extension of Air Quality Attainment Dates for Downwind Transport Areas” (hereinafter referred to as the extension policy), signed by Richard D. Wilson, Acting Assistant Administrator for Air and Radiation. The extension policy, published in a March 25, 1999, Federal Register notice (64 FR 14441), addresses circumstances where pollution from upwind areas interferes with the ability of a downwind area to attain the 1-hour ozone standard by its attainment date. EPA proposed to finalize its action on the determination of nonattainment and reclassification of the St. Louis area only after the area had received an opportunity to qualify for an attainment date extension under the extension policy. On January 29, 2001, the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia ordered EPA to make a determination whether the St. Louis nonattainment area attained the requisite ozone standards. (Sierra Club v. Whitman, No. 98-2733 (CKK).)

On March 19, 2001 (66 FR 15578), EPA finalized its finding that the St. Louis area failed to attain the 1-hour ozone NAAQS by November 15, 1996, and reclassified the area to “serious” as of the effective date of the rule. In addition, that rule established the dates by which Missouri and Illinois were to submit SIP revisions addressing the CAA's pollution control requirements for serious ozone nonattainment areas and attain the 1-hour NAAQS for ozone. The March 19, 2001, rulemaking action was to be effective on May 18, 2001.

On May 16, 2001, EPA published a rule (66 FR 27036) extending the effective date of the March 19, 2001, rulemaking to June 29, 2001. Start Printed Page 4838

On June 26, 2001, EPA issued a final rule (66 FR 33996) in which EPA extended the attainment date for the St. Louis area, consistent with the extension policy, and withdrew the March 19, 2001, rulemaking. The rule also approved the attainment demonstration for the St. Louis area and took several other related actions.

Petitions were filed in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit (Court) (Sierra Club and Missouri Coalition for the Environment v. EPA, (Nos. 01-2844 and 01-2845)) for review of the May 16, 2001, and June 26, 2001, rules. On November 25, 2002, the Court granted the petitions, vacated the June 26, 2001, rule extending the St. Louis area's attainment date, and remanded to EPA for “entry of a final rule that reclassifies St. Louis as a serious nonattainment area effective immediately * * *” (Sierra Club and Missouri Coalition for the Environment v. EPA, 311 F. 3d 853 (7th Cir. 2002)).

This rule reclassifies the St. Louis area as a serious nonattainment area in accordance with the Court's Order, and in accordance with section 181(b)(2)(A) of the CAA. Additional background for this rule may be found in the March 18, 1999, proposal (64 FR 13384) and in the March 19, 2001, final rule (66 FR 15578). This action reinstates EPA's finding that the St. Louis area failed to attain the 1-hour standard by November 15, 1996, as prescribed in Section 181 of the CAA. A summary and discussion of the air quality monitoring data for the St. Louis area for 1994 through 1996 used to make this finding can be found in the March 18, 1999, proposal (64 FR 13384, 13385-87) and in the March 19, 2001, rule (66 FR 15578, 15580-15581, 15583-15584). EPA incorporates by reference in this rule the analyses and discussion of the air quality monitoring data and of the area's new classification set forth in the March 18, 1999, proposed rule and in the March 19, 2001, final rule.

EPA received comments on the March 18, 1999, proposal (and on an April 17, 2000, proposal, 65 FR 20404—see 66 FR 15585-15586 for a discussion of comments on the April 17, 2000, proposal) relating to the necessity and scope of a reclassification of the St. Louis area, which are summarized in the March 19, 2001, final rule (66 FR 15578, 15585-15587). The final rule also contains EPA's detailed response to the comments, which is incorporated by reference in this final rule.

What Is the New Attainment Date for the St. Louis Area?

As part of the reclassification of an area, EPA must establish an attainment date for the reclassified area. Section 181 of the CAA states that the attainment date for serious nonattainment areas shall be as expeditiously as practicable but not later than 9 years after enactment (November 15, 1999). Where an attainment date has already passed and is therefore impossible to meet, EPA has reasoned that the Administrator may establish an attainment date later than the date specified in the CAA. However, EPA believes that it must establish a new attainment date in accordance with the principle in the CAA that attainment must be achieved as expeditiously as practicable.

In the March 19, 2001, rule (66 FR 15578), EPA set forth its reasoning and conclusion that the most appropriate attainment date is one which is as expeditious as practicable and accounts for the upwind reductions associated with the NOX SIP call, or no later than November 15, 2004. In the March 19, 2001, rule (66 FR 15578, 15587), EPA summarized the comments on the appropriate attainment date for the reclassified area and provided EPA's responses to the comments. EPA incorporates its responses and its rationale by reference in this final rule.

When Must Missouri and Illinois Submit SIP Revisions Fulfilling the Requirements for Serious Ozone Nonattainment Areas?

In addition to establishing a new attainment date, EPA must also address the schedule by which Illinois and Missouri are required to submit SIP revisions meeting the CAA's pollution control requirements for serious areas. The measures required by section 182(c) of the CAA include, but are not limited to, the following: (1) Attainment and reasonable further progress demonstrations; (2) enhanced vehicle inspection and maintenance (I/M) programs; (3) clean-fuel vehicle programs; (4) the major source threshold lowered from 100 to 50 tons per year for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxide compounds (NOX); (5) more stringent new source review requirements; (6) an enhanced air monitoring program; and (7) contingency provisions.

In the March 18, 1999, proposal (64 FR 13384) and in the March 19, 2001, rule (66 FR 15585), EPA stated that a submittal deadline of 12 months after the effective date of reclassification will give the states adequate time to adopt and submit the additional serious area requirements. EPA also noted that the 12-month deadline is consistent with the time given to other areas (such as Dallas-Fort Worth, Phoenix, and Santa Barbara) which were reclassified from moderate to serious. EPA received one comment in support of a 12-month deadline and no other comments on the proposed deadline. In the March 19, 2001, rule, EPA required Missouri and Illinois to submit SIP revisions addressing the Act's pollution control requirements for serious ozone nonattainment areas within 12 months of the effective date of the rule.

EPA has determined that a 12-month deadline for submitting SIP revisions meeting the CAA's pollution control requirements for serious areas is appropriate for the reasons stated in the March 19, 2001, rule. Therefore, EPA is requiring that the “serious” area measures be submitted within 12 months of the date of publication of this rule.

What Is the Effective Date of the Reclassification to a Serious Nonattainment Area?

The Court, in its November 25, 2002, Order, vacated the June 26, 2001, rule (66 FR 33996) and remanded for entry of a final rule that reclassifies St. Louis as a serious nonattainment area effective immediately.

On May 16, 2001, EPA published a rule (66 FR 27036) delaying the effective date of reclassification of the St. Louis area to a serious nonattainment area until June 29, 2001. On June 26, 2001, EPA published a rule (66 FR 33996) in which the reclassification of the St. Louis area to a serious nonattainment area was withdrawn. By vacating the June 26, 2001, rule, the Court's Order also vacated the withdrawal of the reclassification.

One conclusion which could be drawn from the Court's Order vacating the June 26, 2001, rule is that the effective date of the reclassification to a serious nonattainment area reverts back to June 29, 2001. Such a conclusion would be inconsistent with the language used by the Court in its remand. The court ordered EPA to “reclassify” the St. Louis area, and to make the reclassification “effective immediately.” Thus, EPA believes that the Court intended for the reclassification of the St. Louis area to a serious nonattainment to be effective immediately upon publication of this rule.

Although it is not appropriate to make this rule retroactive, EPA is making this final rulemaking effective upon publication. Section 553(d) of the Administrative Procedures Act generally provides that rules may not take effect earlier than 30 days after they are published in the Federal Register. However, if an Agency identifies a good Start Printed Page 4839cause, section 553(d)(3) allows a rule to take effect earlier, provided that the Agency publishes its reasoning in the final rule. EPA is making this action effective upon publication in order to comply with an order of the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit. As discussed elsewhere in this rulemaking, the Court ordered EPA to publish this final rule and to make it immediately effective. Therefore, in accordance with section 553(d)(3), EPA finds good cause to establish the date of publication as the effective date of the rule.

For the foregoing reasons, EPA is establishing the date of publication as the effective date of this rule.

Statutory and Executive Order Reviews

A. Executive Order 12866, Regulatory Planning and Review

Under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993), EPA is required to determine whether regulatory actions are significant and therefore should be subject to Office of Management and Budget (OMB) review, economic analysis, and the requirements of the Executive Order. The Executive Order defines a “significant regulatory action” as one that is likely to result in a rule that may meet at least one of the four criteria identified in section 3(f), including, under paragraph (1), that the rule may “have an annual effect on the economy of $100 million or more or adversely affect, in a material way, the economy, a sector of the economy, productivity, competition, jobs, the environment, public health or safety, or state, local or tribal governments or communities.”

The Agency has determined that the determination of nonattainment would result in none of the effects identified in section 3(f) of the Executive Order. Under section 181(b)(2) of the CAA, determinations of nonattainment are based upon air quality considerations and the resulting reclassifications must occur by operation of law. They do not, in and of themselves, impose any new requirements on any sectors of the economy. In addition, because the statutory requirements are clearly defined with respect to the differently classified areas, and because those requirements are automatically triggered by classifications that, in turn, are triggered by air quality values, determinations of nonattainment and reclassification cannot be said to impose a materially adverse impact on state, local, or tribal governments or communities.

B. National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act

Section 12(d) of the National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act of 1995 (NTTAA), Public Law 104-113, section 12(d) (15 U.S.C. 272 note) directs EPA to use voluntary consensus standards in its regulatory activities unless to do so would be inconsistent with applicable law or otherwise impractical. Voluntary consensus standards are technical standards (e.g., materials specifications, test methods, sampling procedures, and business practices) that are developed or adopted by voluntary consensus standards bodies. The NTTAA directs EPA to provide Congress, through OMB, explanations when the Agency decides not to use available and applicable voluntary consensus standards. This action does not involve technical standards. Therefore, EPA did not consider the use of any voluntary consensus standards.

C. Regulatory Flexibility Act

The Regulatory Flexibility Act (RFA) generally requires an agency to conduct a regulatory flexibility analysis of any rule subject to notice and comment rulemaking requirements unless the agency certifies that the rule will not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities. Small entities include small businesses, small not-for-profit enterprises, and small governmental jurisdictions.

Determinations of nonattainment and the resulting reclassification of nonattainment areas by operation of law under section 181(b)(2) of the CAA do not in and of themselves create any new requirements. Instead, this rulemaking only makes a factual determination, and does not directly regulate any entities. See 62 FR 60001, 60007-60008, and 60010 (November 6, 1997) for additional analysis of the RFA implications of attainment determinations. Therefore, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 605(b), I certify that today's final action does not have a significant impact on a substantial number of small entities within the meaning of those terms for RFA purposes.

D. Unfunded Mandates Reform Act

Under section 202 of the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (UMRA), signed into law on March 22, 1995, EPA must prepare a budgetary impact statement to accompany any proposed or final rule that includes a Federal mandate that may result in estimated annual costs to state, local, or tribal governments in the aggregate, or to the private sector, of $100 million or more. Under section 205, EPA must select the most cost-effective and least burdensome alternative that achieves the objectives of the rule and is consistent with statutory requirements. Section 203 requires EPA to establish a plan for informing and advising any small governments that may be significantly or uniquely impacted by the rule.

EPA believes, as discussed above, that the finding of nonattainment is a factual determination based upon air quality considerations and that the resulting reclassification of the area must occur by operation of law. Thus, the finding does not constitute a Federal mandate, as defined in section 101 of the UMRA, because it does not impose an enforceable duty on any entity.

E. Executive Order 13045, Protection of Children From Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks

Protection of Children from Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks (62 FR 19885, April 23, 1997), applies to any rule that: (1) Is determined to be economically significant as defined under Executive Order 12866, and (2) concerns an environmental health or safety risk that EPA has reason to believe may have a disproportionate effect on children. If the regulatory action meets both criteria, the Agency must evaluate the environmental health or safety effects of the planned rule on children, and explain why the planned regulation is preferable to other potentially effective and reasonably feasible alternatives considered by the Agency. This action is not subject to Executive Order 13045 because it does not involve decisions intended to mitigate environmental health or safety risks.

F. Executive Order 13132, Federalism

Federalism (64 FR 43255, August 10, 1999) requires EPA to develop an accountable process to ensure “meaningful and timely input by state and local officials in the development of regulatory policies that have federalism implications.” “Policies that have federalism implications” is defined in the Executive Order to include regulations that have “substantial direct effects on the states, on the relationship between the national government and the states, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government.” Under Executive Order 13132, EPA may not issue a regulation that has federalism implications, that imposes substantial direct compliance costs, and that is not required by statute, unless the Federal Government provides the funds Start Printed Page 4840necessary to pay the direct compliance costs incurred by state and local governments, or EPA consults with state and local officials early in the process of developing the proposed regulation. EPA also may not issue a regulation that has federalism implications and that preempts state law unless the Agency consults with state and local officials early in the process of developing the proposed regulation.

This determination of nonattainment and the resulting reclassification of a nonattainment area by operation of law will not have substantial direct effects on the states, on the relationship between the national government and the states, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government, as specified in Executive Order 13132, because this action does not, in and of itself, impose any new requirements on any sectors of the economy, and does not alter the relationship or the distribution of power and responsibilities established in the CAA. Thus, the requirements of section 6 of the Executive Order do not apply to these actions.

G. Executive Order 13175, Coordination With Indian Tribal Governments

Executive Order 13175, entitled “Consultation and Coordination with Indian Tribal Governments” (65 FR 67249, November 9, 2000), requires EPA to develop an accountable process to ensure “meaningful and timely input by tribal officials in the development of regulatory policies that have tribal implications.” This final rule does not have tribal implications, as specified in Executive Order 13175. It will not have substantial direct effects on tribal governments, on the relationship between the Federal government and Indian tribes, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities between the Federal government and Indian tribes. Thus, Executive Order 13175 does not apply to this rule.

H. Congressional Review Act

The Congressional Review Act, 5 U.S.C. 801 et seq., as added by the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act of 1996, generally provides that before a rule may take effect, the agency promulgating the rule must submit a rule report, which includes a copy of the rule, to each House of the Congress and to the Comptroller General of the United States. EPA will submit a report containing this rule and other required information to the United States Senate, the United States House of Representatives, and the Comptroller General of the United States prior to publication of the rule in the Federal Register. A major rule cannot take effect until 60 days after it is published in the Federal Register. This action is not a “major rule” as defined by 5 U.S.C. 804(2).

I. Petitions for Judicial Review

Under section 307(b)(1) of the CAA, petitions for judicial review of this action must be filed in the United States Court of Appeals for the appropriate circuit by March 31, 2003. Filing a petition for reconsideration by the Administrator of this final rule does not affect the finality of this rule for the purposes of judicial review nor does it extend the time within which a petition for judicial review may be filed, and shall not postpone the effectiveness of such rule or action. This action may not be challenged later in proceedings to enforce its requirements. (See CAA section 307(b)(2).)

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List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 81

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Dated: January 13, 2003.

James Gulliford,

Regional Administrator, Region 7.

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Dated: January 16, 2003.

Thomas V. Skinner,

Regional Administrator, Region 5.

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Chapter I, title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations is amended as follows:

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PART 81—[AMENDED]

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1. The authority citation for part 81 continues to read as follows:

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Authority: 42 U.S.C. 7401, et seq.

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2. In § 81.314 the table entitled “Illinois—Ozone (1-Hour Standard)” is amended by revising the entry for St. Louis Area to read as follows:

End Amendment Part
Illinois.
* * * * *

Illinois—Ozone (1-Hour Standard)

Designated areaDesignationClassification
Date 1TypeDate 1Type
*         *         *         *         *         *         *
St. Louis Area:
Madison County1-30-2003Nonattainment1-30-2003Serious.
Monroe County1-30-2003Nonattainment1-30-2003Serious.
St. Clair County1-30-2003Nonattainment1-30-2003Serious.
*         *         *         *         *         *         *
1 This date is October 18, 2000, unless otherwise noted.
* * * * *
Start Amendment Part

3. In § 81.326 the table entitled “Missouri—Ozone (1-Hour Standard)” is amended by revising the entry for St. Louis Area to read as follows:

End Amendment Part
Missouri.
* * * * *
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Missouri—Ozone (1-Hour Standard)

Designated areaDesignationClassification
Date 1TypeDate 1Type
*         *         *         *         *         *         *
St. Louis Area:
Franklin County1-30-2003Nonattainment1-30-2003Serious.
Jefferson County1-30-2003Nonattainment1-30-2003Serious.
St. Charles County1-30-2003Nonattainment1-30-2003Serious.
St. Louis County1-30-2003Nonattainment1-30-2003Serious.
St. Louis County1-30-2003Nonattainment1-30-2003Serious.
*         *         *         *         *         *         *
1 This date is October 18, 2000, unless otherwise noted.
* * * * *
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Footnotes

1.  Section 181(a)(5) specifies that a state may request, and EPA may grant, up to two one-year attainment date extensions. EPA may grant an extension if: (1) The state has complied with the requirements and commitments pertaining to the applicable implementation plan for the area, and (2) the area has measured no more than one exceedance of the ozone standard at any monitoring site in the nonattainment area in the year in which attainment is required.

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[FR Doc. 03-1771 Filed 1-29-03; 8:45 am]

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