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Rule

Security Zone; Waters Adjacent to San Onofre, San Diego County, CA

Document Details

Information about this document as published in the Federal Register.

Published Document

This document has been published in the Federal Register. Use the PDF linked in the document sidebar for the official electronic format.

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AGENCY:

Coast Guard, DHS.

ACTION:

Temporary final rule.

SUMMARY:

The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary security zone in the waters adjacent to the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station in San Diego County, CA. This action is necessary to ensure public safety and prevent sabotage or terrorist acts against the public and commercial structures and individuals near or in this structure. This security zone will prohibit all persons and vessels from entering, transiting through or anchoring within the security zone unless authorized by the Captain of the Port (COTP), or his designated representative. This security zone will not affect recreational activities within the surf zone or the beach.

DATES:

This rule is effective from 12:01 a.m. (PST) on March 21, 2003 to 11:59 p.m. (PDT) on May 21, 2003.

ADDRESSES:

Documents indicated in this preamble as being available in the docket, are part of docket COTP San Diego 03-014, and are available for inspection or copying at U.S. Coast Guard Marine Safety Office San Diego, 2716 N. Harbor Dr., San Diego, CA 92101, between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays.

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FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:

Lieutenant Commander Rick Sorrell, Marine Safety Office San Diego, at (619) 683-6495.

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SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Regulatory Information

On February 6, 2002, we published a temporary final rule for waters adjacent to the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station entitled “Security Zone; Waters adjacent to San Onofre, San Diego County, California” in the Federal Register (67 FR 5480) under Sec. 165.T11-048. It has been in effect since October 25, 2001 and was set to expire at 3:59 p.m. PDT on June 21, 2002. It has since been extended and is now set to expire at 11:59 p.m. PDT March 21, 2003.

We did not publish a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) for this regulation. Under 5 U.S.C. 553(b)(B), the Coast Guard finds that good cause exists for not publishing a NPRM. Due to the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001 and the warnings given by national security and intelligence officials, there is an increased risk that further subversive or terrorist activity may be launched against the United States. A heightened level of security has been established concerning all vessels operating in the waters adjacent to the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station area. This security zone is needed to protect the United States and more specifically the personnel and property of the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station. The original TFR was urgently required to prevent possible terrorist strikes against the United States and more specifically the people, waterways, and properties near the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station. It was anticipated that we would assess the security environment at the end of the effective period to determine whether continuing security precautions were required and, if so, propose regulations responsive to existing conditions. We have determined the need for continued security regulations exists.

The measures contemplated by this rule are intended to prevent future terrorist attacks against individuals and facilities within or adjacent to San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station. Immediate action is required to accomplish these objectives and necessary to continue safeguarding these vessels and the surrounding area. Any delay in the effective date of this rule is impractical and contrary to the public interest.

For the reasons stated in the paragraphs above under 5 U.S.C. 553(d)(3), the Coast Guard also finds that good cause exists for making this rule effective less than 30 days after publication in the Federal Register.

Background and Purpose

On September 11, 2001, terrorists launched attacks on civilian and military targets within the United States killing large numbers of people and damaging properties of national significance. Vessels operating near the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station present possible platforms from which individuals may gain unauthorized access to this installation, or launch terrorist attacks upon the waterfront structures and adjacent population centers.

In response to these terrorist acts, and in order to prevent similar occurrences, the Coast Guard has established a temporary security zone in the navigable waters of the United States adjacent to the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station. This temporary security zone is necessary to provide for the safety and security of the United States of America and the people, ports, waterways and properties within the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station area.

As of today, the need for this security zone still exists. The effective period of this temporary final rule will extend through 11:59 p.m. PST March 21, 2003.

Discussion of Rule

This regulation extends the current security zone that prohibits all vessel traffic from entering, transiting or anchoring within a one nautical mile Start Printed Page 17737radius of San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station that is centered at the following coordinate: 33° 22’ 30” N, 117° 33’ 50” W. This security zone will not affect recreational activities within the surf zone or the beach.

As part of the Diplomatic Security and Antiterrorism Act of 1986 (Pub. L. 99-399), Congress amended The Ports and Waterways Safety Act (PWSA) to allow the Coast Guard to take actions, including the establishment of security and safety zones, to prevent or respond to acts of terrorism against individuals, vessels, or public or commercial structures. 33 U.S.C. 1226. The terrorist acts against the United States on September 11, 2001, have increased the need for safety and security measures on U.S. ports and waterways. In response to these terrorist acts, and in order to prevent similar occurrences, the Coast Guard is establishing a temporary security zone in the navigable waters of the United States adjacent to the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station. This temporary security zone is necessary to provide for the safety and security of the United States of America and the people, ports, waterways and properties within the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station area.

This temporary security zone, prohibiting all vessel traffic from entering, transiting or anchoring within the above-described area, is necessary for the security and protection of the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station. This zone will be enforced by Coast Guard patrol craft or any patrol craft and resources enlisted by the COTP.

Persons and vessels are prohibited from entering into this security zone unless authorized by the Captain of the Port or his designated representative. Each person and vessel in a security zone shall obey any direction or order of the COTP. The COTP may remove any person, vessel, article, or thing from a security zone. No person may board, or take or place any article or thing on board, any vessel in a security zone without the permission of the COTP.

Any violation of the security zone described herein is punishable by, among other things, criminal penalties (imprisonment for not more than 12 years and a fine of not more than $250,000), in rem liability against the offending vessel, and license sanctions.

Regulatory Evaluation

This rule is not a “significant regulatory action” under section 3(f) of Executive Order 12866, Regulatory Planning and Review, and does not require an assessment of potential costs and benefits under section 6(a)(3) of that Order. The Office of Management and Budget has not reviewed it under that Order. It is not “significant” under the regulatory policies and procedures of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS).

Due to the recent terrorist actions against the United States the implementation of this security zone is necessary for the protection of the United States and its people. Because these security zones are established in an area near the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station that is seldom used, the Coast Guard expects the economic impact of this rule to be so minimal that full regulatory evaluation under paragraph 10(e) of the regulatory policies and procedures of DHS is unnecessary.

Small Entities

Under the Regulatory Flexibility Act (5 U.S.C. 601-612), the Coast Guard considered whether this rule would have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities. The term “small entities” includes small businesses, not-for-profit organizations that are independently owned and operated and are not dominant in their fields, and governmental jurisdictions with populations less than 50,000.

This security zone will not have a significant impact on a substantial number of small entities because the portion of the security zone that affects the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station area is infrequently transited. Therefore, the Coast Guard certifies under 5 U.S.C. 605(b) that this temporary final rule will not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities.

Assistance for Small Entities

In accordance with section 213(a) of the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act of 1996 (Pub. L. 104-121), the Coast Guard offers to assist small entities in understanding the rule so that they can better evaluate its effects on them and participate in the rulemaking process. If your small business or organization is affected by this rule and you have questions concerning its provisions or options for compliance, please contact Lieutenant Commander Rick Sorrell, Marine Safety Office San Diego, at (619) 683-6495.

Small businesses may send comments on the actions of Federal employees who enforce, or otherwise determine compliance with, Federal regulations to the Small Business and Agriculture Regulatory Enforcement Ombudsman and the Regional Small Business Regulatory Fairness Boards. If you wish to comment on actions by employees of the Coast Guard, call 1-888-REG-FAIR (1-888-734-3247).

Collection of Information

This rule calls for no new collection of information under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501-3520).

Federalism

A rule has implications for federalism under Executive Order 13132, Federalism, if it has a substantial direct effect on State or local governments and would either preempt State law or impose a substantial direct cost of compliance on them. We have analyzed this rule and have determined that this rule does not have implications for federalism.

Unfunded Mandates Reform Act

The Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (2 U.S.C. 1531-1538) requires Federal agencies to assess the effects of their discretionary regulatory actions. In particular, the Act addresses actions that may result in the expenditure by a State, local, or tribal government, in the aggregate, or by the private sector of $100,000,000 or more in any one year. Though this rule will not result in such expenditure, we do discuss the effects of this rule elsewhere in this preamble.

Taking of Private Property

This rule will not effect a taking of private property or otherwise have taking implications under Executive Order 12630, Governmental Actions and Interference with Constitutionally Protected Property Rights.

Civil Justice Reform

This rule meets applicable standards in sections 3(a) and 3(b)(2) of Executive Order 12988, Civil Justice Reform, to minimize litigation, eliminate ambiguity, and reduce burden.

Protection of Children

We have analyzed this rule under Executive Order 13045, Protection of Children from Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks. This rule is not an economically significant rule and does not create an environmental risk to health or risk to safety that may disproportionately affect children.

Indian Tribal Governments

This rule does not have tribal implications under Executive Order 13175, Consultation and Coordination with Indian Tribal Governments, because it does not have a substantial direct effect on one or more Indian tribes, on the relationship between the Federal Government and Indian tribes, Start Printed Page 17738or on the distribution of power and responsibilities between the Federal Government and Indian tribes.

Energy Effects

We have analyzed this rule under Executive Order 13211, Actions Concerning Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use. We have determined that it is not a “significant energy action” under that order because it is not a “significant regulatory action” under Executive Order 12866 and is not likely to have a significant adverse effect on the supply, distribution, or use of energy. It has not been designated by the Administrator of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs as a significant energy action. Therefore, it does not require a Statement of Energy Effects under Executive Order 13211.

Environment

We have considered the environmental impact of this rule and concluded that under figure 2-1, paragraph (34)(g), of Commandant Instruction M16475.1D, this rule is categorically excluded from further environmental documentation because we are establishing a security zone. A “Categorical Exclusion Determination” is available in the docket for inspection or copying where indicated under ADDRESSES.

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List of Subjects in 33 CFR Part 165

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For the reasons discussed in the preamble, the Coast Guard amends

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PART 165—REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS

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1. The authority citation for part 165 continues to read as follows:

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Authority: 33 U.S.C. 1231; 50 U.S.C. 191, 33 CFR 1.05-1(g), 6.04-1, 6.04-6, and 160.5; Department of Homeland Security Delegation No. 0170.

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2. Revise § 165.T11-048 to read as follows:

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Security Zone; Waters adjacent to San Onofre, San Diego County, CA.

(a) Location. This security zone will encompass the waters within a one nautical mile seaward arc off San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station that is centered at the following coordinate: latitude 33°22.186′ N, longitude 117°33.607′ W. This security zone will not affect recreational activities within the surf zone or the beach.

(b) Effective Dates. This security zone will be in effect from 12:01 a.m. (PST) on March 21, 2003 to 11:59 p.m. (PDT) on May 21, 2003.

(c) Waivers. The COTP may waive any of the requirements of this rule for any person, vessel or class of vessel upon finding that circumstances are such that application of the security zone is unnecessary for national or port security.

(1) The following categories of persons are automatically exempt from requirement to depart the security zone but must comply with the provisions set forth below to operate in the security zone:

(i) Recreational surfers;

(ii) Hikers on the beach;

(iii) Swimmers.

(2) Reports to the COTP and requests for waivers required by this section must be made by telephone or radio call to the following numbers or on the following channels: Marine Safety Office San Diego at (619) 683-6495 or VHF-FM channel 16.

(3) COTP reserves the authority to revoke any waivers granted in order to provide for the safety and security of boaters, the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station or its personnel.

(d) Authority. In addition to 33 U.S.C. 1231, the authority for this section includes 33 U.S.C. 1226.

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Dated: March 21, 2003.

Stephen P. Metruck,

Commander, Coast Guard, Captain of the Port, San Diego.

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[FR Doc. 03-8945 Filed 4-10-03; 8:45 am]

BILLING CODE 4910-15-P