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Notice

Self-Regulatory Organizations; The Depository Trust Company; Order Approving Proposed Rule Change To Establish a Transaction Look-Ahead Process

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Information about this document as published in the Federal Register.

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This document has been published in the Federal Register. Use the PDF linked in the document sidebar for the official electronic format.

Start Preamble June 10, 2003.

I. Introduction

On April 9, 2003, The Depository Trust Company (“DTC”) filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“Commission”) proposed rule change SR-DTC-2003-07 pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (“Act”).[1] Notice of the proposal was published in the Federal Register on April 28, 2003.[2] For the reasons discussed below, the Commission is approving the proposed rule change.

II. Description

The purpose of the proposed rule change is to establish a transaction look-ahead process (“Look-Ahead”) which will reduce transaction blockage by applying the net amount of offsetting receive and deliver transactions in the same security rather than the gross amount of the receive transaction to a participant's net debit cap.[3]

DTC's system controls prevent the processing of a transaction (i.e., cause the transaction to recycle) when the deliverer has insufficient position or insufficient collateral, the receiver has insufficient collateral, or the processing of the transaction would cause the receiver's net debit cap to be breached. For purposes of these controls, each transaction is assessed individually without regard to offsetting transactions that might resolve any system control issue presented by the initial transaction itself.

In principle, a long series of back-to-back transactions could be blocked as a result of the first transaction failing. For example, if a transaction fails because of insufficient position, insufficient collateral, or breaching of the net debit cap, then a second transaction could fail because it is dependent on the first delivery to establish the necessary securities position, then a third could fail, and so on. This does in fact occur quite often in the money market instrument (“MMI”) market because of the large values involved when issuing/paying agents sell new commercial paper to broker-dealers who then make deliveries to custodians, who in turn have maturities of commercial paper awaiting acceptance by the issuing/paying agents.

DTC plans to introduce Look-Ahead in June. Look-Ahead will reduce transaction blockage by applying the net amount of offsetting receive and deliver transactions in the same security rather than the gross amount of the receive transaction to a participant's net debit cap. Look-Ahead will identify receive transactions pending due to a net debit cap insufficiency and will link them to offsetting delivery transactions in the same security pending for a quantity deficiency. DTC will calculate the net effect of the offsetting transactions on the three participants involved, and if the net of the transactions results in positive risk management controls in all three accounts, the transactions will be completed. Initially, this capability will be available only for muni and corporate bonds, including MMIs where it is expected to have the widest application.

As a result of Look-Ahead, the number of recycling transactions should be reduced which could also reduce the need for intraday funding by participants. Participants will not be required to make systemic changes and can continue to process their deliveries as they do today.

III. Discussion

Section 17A(b)(3)(F) of the Act requires that the rules of a clearing agency be designed to promote the prompt and accurate clearance and settlement of securities transactions.[4] The Commission finds that DTC's proposed rule change is consistent with this requirement because by applying the net amount of offsetting receive and deliver transactions in the same security rather than the gross amount of the receive transaction to a participant's net debit cap, the proposed rule change should reduce the number of blocked transactions at DTC which will promote the prompt and accurate clearance and settlement of securities transactions.

IV. Conclusion

On the basis of the foregoing, the Commission finds that the proposed rule change is consistent with the requirements of the Act and in particular section 17A of the Act and the rules and regulations thereunder.Start Printed Page 35745

It Is therefore ordered, pursuant to section 19(b)(2) of the Act, that the proposed rule change (File No. SR-DTC-2003-07) be and hereby is approved.

Start Signature

For the Commission by the Division of Market Regulation, pursuant to delegated authority.[5]

Margaret H. McFarland,

Deputy Secretary

End Signature End Preamble

Footnotes

2.  Securities Exchange Act Release No. 47709 (April 21, 2003), 68 FR 22432.

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3.  The net debit cap, based upon the activity of the participant, is the maximum amount a participant may owe for transactions. Currently, the maximum allowable net debit cap is $1.8 billion per participant.

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4.  15 U.S.C. 78q-1(b)(3)(F).

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[FR Doc. 03-15112 Filed 6-13-03; 8:45 am]

BILLING CODE 8010-01-M