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Change in Deadline for Rulemaking To Address the Control of Emissions From New Marine Compression-Ignition Engines at or Above 30 Liters Per Cylinder

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Information about this document as published in the Federal Register.

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Start Preamble

AGENCY:

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

ACTION:

Direct Final Rule.

SUMMARY:

A January 2003 final rule established the first U.S. emission standards for new compression-ignition Category 3 marine engines, those with a displacement at or above 30 liters per cylinder displacement. It also established a deadline of April 27, 2007 for EPA to promulgate a new tier of emission standards for these engines as determined appropriate under Clean Air Act (CAA) section 213(a). This rulemaking schedule was intended to allow EPA time to consider the state of technology that may permit deeper emission reductions and the status of international action for more stringent standards. Since 2003, we have continued to gain a greater understanding of the technical issues described in the final rule and to assess the continuing efforts of manufacturers to apply advanced emission control technologies to these very large engines, through ongoing discussions with various stakeholders. In addition, we have continued to work with and through the International Maritime Organization (IMO) toward more stringent international emission standards that would apply to all new marine diesel engines on ships engaged in international transportation. IMO is an important forum for EPA to gather new information and data regarding emission control technologies, costs, and other information on Category 3 engines and vessels. IMO is also important because the majority of ships used in international commerce are flagged in other nations. Due to the length of time necessary to assess advanced emission control technologies much of the information that we believe is necessary to develop more stringent Category 3 marine diesel engines standards has only become available recently and we expect more information to come to light in the course of the current negotiations underway at the IMO. Therefore, EPA is adopting a new deadline for the rulemaking that will consider the next tier of Category 3 marine diesel engine standards. Under this new schedule, EPA would adopt a final rule by December 17, 2009.

DATES:

This rule is effective on June 26, 2007 without further notice, unless EPA receives adverse comment by May 29, 2007 or a request for a public hearing by May 17, 2007. If a hearing is requested by this date, it will be held at a time and place to be published in the Federal Register. After the hearing, the docket for this rulemaking will remain open for an additional 30 days to receive comments. If a hearing is held, EPA will publish a document in the Federal Register extending the comment period for 30 days after the hearing. If EPA receives adverse comments or a request for public hearing, it will publish a timely withdrawal of the direct final rule in the Federal Register and inform the public that the rule will not take effect.

ADDRESSES:

Submit your comments, identified by Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-OAR-2007-0120, by one of the following methods:

  • http://www.regulations.gov: Follow the on-line instructions for submitting comments.
  • E-mail: a-and-r-docket@epa.gov
  • Fax: (202) 566-1741
  • Mail: Environmental Protection Agency, Mail Code: 6102T, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW., Washington, DC 20460. Please include two copies.
  • Hand Delivery: EPA Docket Center (Air Docket), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, EPA West Building, 1301 Constitution Avenue, NW., Room: 3334 Mail Code: 6102T, Washington, DC. Such deliveries are only accepted during the Docket's normal hours of operation, and special arrangements should be made for deliveries of boxed information.

Instructions: Direct your comments to Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-OAR-2007-0120. EPA's policy is that all comments received will be included in the public docket without change and may be made available online at http://www.regulations.gov, including any personal information provided, unless the comment includes information claimed to be Confidential Business Information (CBI) or other information whose disclosure is restricted by statute. Do not submit information that you consider to be CBI or otherwise protected through http://www.regulations.gov or e-mail. The http://www.regulations.gov Web site is an “anonymous access” system, which means EPA will not know your identity or contact information unless you provide it in the body of your comment. If you send an e-mail comment directly to EPA without going through http://www.regulations.gov your e-mail address will be automatically captured and included as part of the comment that is placed in the public docket and made available on the Internet. If you submit an electronic comment, EPA recommends that you include your name and other contact information in the body of your comment and with any disk or CD-ROM you submit. If EPA cannot read your comment due to technical difficulties and cannot contact you for clarification, EPA may not be able to consider your comment. Electronic files should avoid the use of special characters, any form of encryption, and be free of any defects or viruses. For additional information about EPA's public docket visit the EPA Docket Center homepage at http://www.epa.gov/​epahome/​dockets.htm.

Docket: All documents in the docket are listed in the http://www.regulations.gov index. Although listed in the index, some information is not publicly available, e.g., CBI or other information whose disclosure is restricted by statute. Certain other material, such as copyrighted material, will be publicly available only in hard copy. Publicly available docket materials are available either electronically in http://www.regulations.gov or in hard copy at the EPA Docket Center, EPA/DC, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution Avenue, NW., Washington, DC. The Public Reading Room is open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding legal holidays. The telephone number for the Public Reading Room is (202) 566-1744, and the telephone number for the Air Docket is (202) 566-1742.

Public Hearing: To request a public hearing, contact Mike Samulski at (734) 214-4532 or samulski.michael@epa.gov. If a public hearing is held, persons wishing to testify must submit copies of their testimony to the docket and to Mike Samulski at the address below, no later than 10 days prior to the hearing.

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FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:

Michael Samulski, Assessment and Standards Division, Office of Start Printed Page 20949Transportation and Air Quality, 2000 Traverwood Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48105; telephone number: (734) 214-4532; fax number: (734) 214-4050; e-mail address: samulski.michael@epa.gov.

End Further Info End Preamble Start Supplemental Information

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

I. Why Is EPA Using a Direct Final Rule?

EPA is publishing this as a direct final rule because we view this as a relatively noncontroversial action. Based on what we have learned in our consultations over the past several years, we do not believe that this extension will delay the achievement of further emission reductions from Category 3 marine engines beyond what could potentially have been achieved and creates the opportunity for the development and implementation of a more effective program for the longer term. However, in the “Proposed Rules” section of today's Federal Register, we are publishing a separate document that will serve as the proposed rule to consider adoption of the provisions in this direct final rule if adverse comments or a request for a public hearing are received on this action. We will not institute a second comment period on this action. Any parties interested in commenting must do so at this time. For further information about commenting on this rule, see the ADDRESSES section of this document.

If EPA receives adverse comment or a request for a public hearing, we will publish a timely withdrawal in the Federal Register informing the public that this direct final rule will not take effect. We would address all public comments in any subsequent final rule based on the proposed rule.

II. Does This Action Apply to Me?

This action will affect companies that manufacture, sell, or import into the United States new marine compression-ignition engines for use on vessels flagged or registered in the United States; companies and persons that make vessels that will be flagged or registered in the United States and that use such engines; and the owners or operators of such U.S. vessels. This action may also affect companies and persons that rebuild or maintain these engines. Affected categories and entities include the following:

CategoryNAICS code aExamples of potentially affected entities
Industry333618Manufacturers of new marine diesel engines.
Industry336611Manufacturers of marine vessels.
Industry811310Engine repair and maintenance.
Industry483Water transportation, freight and passenger.
a North American Industry Classification System (NAICS).

This table is not intended to be exhaustive, but rather provides a guide for readers regarding entities likely to be regulated by this action. To determine whether particular activities may be affected by this action, you should carefully examine the regulations. You may direct questions regarding the applicability of this action as noted in FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT.

III. What Should I Consider as I Prepare My Comments for EPA?

A. Submitting CBI. Do not submit Confidential Business Information (CBI) to EPA through http://www.regulations.gov or e-mail. Clearly mark the part or all of the information that you claim to be CBI. For CBI information in a disk or CD ROM that you mail to EPA, mark the outside of the disk or CD ROM as CBI and then identify electronically within the disk or CD ROM the specific information that is claimed as CBI. In addition to one complete version of the comment that includes information claimed as CBI, a copy of the comment that does not contain the information claimed as CBI must be submitted for inclusion in the public docket. Information so marked will not be disclosed except in accordance with procedures set forth in 40 CFR part 2.

B. Tips for Preparing Your Comments. When submitting comments, remember to:

  • Identify the rulemaking by docket number and other identifying information (subject heading, Federal Register date and page number).
  • Follow directions—The agency may ask you to respond to specific questions or organize comments by referencing a Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) part or section number.
  • Explain why you agree or disagree; suggest alternatives and substitute language for your requested changes.
  • Describe any assumptions and provide any technical information and/or data that you used.
  • If you estimate potential costs or burdens, explain how you arrived at your estimate in sufficient detail to allow for it to be reproduced.
  • Provide specific examples to illustrate your concerns, and suggest alternatives.
  • Explain your views as clearly as possible, avoiding the use of profanity or personal threats.
  • Make sure to submit your comments by the comment period deadline identified.

IV. Summary of Rule

In January 2003, we adopted standards for new Category 3 compression-ignition marine engines, at or above 30 liters per cylinder displacement.[1] The program we adopted reflected a two-part approach. EPA evaluated the emissions control potential from various kinds of technology, alone or in combination, including (1) the in-cylinder controls currently used on new marine engines to meet the international consensus NOX standards contained in the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL Annex VI); (2) additional use and optimization of these controls; and (3) more advanced technologies such as SCR and water injection, EPA concluded that it would not be appropriate to adopt long-term technology forcing standards in that rulemaking. Instead, we set a near-term standard effective in 2004 that is equivalent to the MARPOL Annex VI oxides of nitrogen (NOX) standard and can be achieved through existing emissions control technology. We also committed to a subsequent rulemaking that would review the Tier 1 near-term standards and if appropriate revise them with a deadline to complete that rulemaking by April 27, 2007. That rulemaking schedule was intended to allow us additional time to consider the state of technology that may permit deeper reductions and the status of international action for more stringent standards. We also stated we would consider an additional tier of standards Start Printed Page 20950based on this assessment of technological feasibility and other factors and consider the application of these standards to foreign-flagged vessels that enter U.S. ports.

In assessing the potential of advance emission control technologies we concluded that while further reductions could be achieved if a longer lead time were allowed, a variety of technical reasons made it more appropriate to defer final action on such longer-term standards to a second rulemaking. An additional reason supporting this two-tier approach was to facilitate international negotiations over the next round of reductions that could be implemented under Annex VI, which in turn could facilitate EPA's regulatory program to reduce emissions from Category 3 marine diesel engines. IMO is an important forum for EPA to gather new information and data regarding emission control technology, costs, and other information. The opportunity at IMO for stringent international standards is also important because the vast majority of vessels with Category 3 marine diesel engines that enter U.S. waters are flagged outside the United States. We are engaged in the IMO negotiations with the understanding that adopting appropriate international standards would be the most efficient mechanism to control emissions from U.S. and foreign flagged vessels.

In the past few years, new information has become available regarding the effectiveness of advance emission control technologies on Category 3 engines which will assist us in developing new standards. In addition, the IMO has only recently begun negotiations for a new tier of international standards. EPA is actively engaged in these negotiations as a member of the United States delegation, and the United States recently submitted a proposal to IMO that describes a framework for emission limits that, if enacted, could achieve significant reductions in NOX, particulate matter (PM), and oxides of sulfur (SOX) emissions from marine vessels.[2] We expect this framework to form the basis of our domestic rulemaking proposal. We are developing an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking under section 213 of the Clean Air Act which describes EPA's current thinking with regard to potential new requirements for Category 3 marine powered vessels and identifies and discusses a number of important issues upon which we will seek comment. We expect to issue the Advanced Notice within the next few months.

In recognition of the current situation, EPA is taking this action to establish a new rulemaking deadline that will facilitate our ability to achieve this objective as part of the international process and through the adoption of the same requirements through an EPA rulemaking. Today's action will establish a new rulemaking deadline of December 17, 2009 for a final rule addressing additional emission standards for Category 3 marine engines that we determine are appropriate under section 213(a)(3).

Concurrent with conducting a rulemaking under CAA section 213(a) for Category 3 marine powered vessels, we will continue to promote more stringent standards at IMO and encourage the IMO to adopt emission controls for Category 3 marine powered vessels that seek to aggressively reduce the impact of marine ships on air quality.

V. Statutory and Executive Order Reviews

A. Executive Order 12866: Regulatory Planning and Review

This action is not a “significant regulatory action” under the terms of Executive Order (EO) 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993) and is therefore not subject to review under the EO. This direct final rule merely changes the regulatory schedule for a rulemaking to address emissions from Category 3 marine engines. There are no new costs associated with this rule.

B. Paperwork Reduction Act

This action does not impose any new information collection burden. This direct final rule merely changes the regulatory schedule for a rulemaking to address emissions from Category 3 marine engines. However, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has previously approved the information collection requirements contained in the existing regulations [40 CFR 94] under the provisions of the Paperwork Reduction Act, 44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq. and has assigned OMB control number 2060-0287, EPA ICR number 1684.08. A copy of the OMB approved Information Collection Request (ICR) may be obtained from Susan Auby, Collection Strategies Division; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (2822T); 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW., Washington, DC 20460 or by calling (202) 566-1672.

Burden means the total time, effort, or financial resources expended by persons to generate, maintain, retain, or disclose or provide information to or for a Federal agency. This includes the time needed to review instructions; develop, acquire, install, and utilize technology and systems for the purposes of collecting, validating, and verifying information, processing and maintaining information, and disclosing and providing information; adjust the existing ways to comply with any previously applicable instructions and requirements; train personnel to be able to respond to a collection of information; search data sources; complete and review the collection of information; and transmit or otherwise disclose the information.

An agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to a collection of information unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number. The OMB control numbers for EPA's regulations in 40 CFR are listed in 40 CFR part 9.

C. Regulatory Flexibility Act

The Regulatory Flexibility Act (RFA) generally requires an agency to prepare a regulatory flexibility analysis of any rule subject to notice and comment rulemaking requirements under the Administrative Procedure Act or any other statute unless the agency certifies that the rule will not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities. Small entities include small businesses, small organizations, and small governmental jurisdictions.

For purposes of assessing the impacts of this final rule on small entities, a small entity is defined as: (1) A small business that meets the definition for business based on SBA size standards at 13 CFR 121.201; (2) a small governmental jurisdiction that is a government of a city, county, town, school district or special district with a population of less than 50,000; and (3) a small organization that is any not-for-profit enterprise which is independently owned and operated and is not dominant in its field.

After considering the economic impacts of today's final rule on small entities, I certify that this action will not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities. In determining whether a rule has a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities, the impact of concern is any significant adverse economic impact on small entities, since the primary purpose of the regulatory flexibility analyses is to identify and address regulatory alternatives “which minimize any significant economic impact of the rule Start Printed Page 20951on small entities.” 5 U.S.C. 603 and 604. Thus, an agency may certify that a rule will not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities if the rule relieves regulatory burden, or otherwise has a positive economic effect on all of the small entities subject to the rule.

This direct final rule merely changes the regulatory schedule for a rulemaking to address emissions from Category 3 marine engines. We have therefore concluded that today's final rule will relieve regulatory burden for all affected small entities.

D. Unfunded Mandates Reform Act

Title II of the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (UMRA), Public Law 104-4, establishes requirements for federal agencies to assess the effects of their regulatory actions on state, local, and tribal governments and the private sector. Under section 202 of the UMRA, EPA generally must prepare a written statement, including a cost-benefit analysis, for proposed and final rules with “federal mandates” that may result in expenditures to state, local, and tribal governments, in the aggregate, or to the private sector, of $100 million or more in any one year. Before promulgating an EPA rule for which a written statement is needed, section 205 of the UMRA generally requires EPA to identify and consider a reasonable number of regulatory alternatives and to adopt the least costly, most cost-effective, or least burdensome alternative that achieves the objectives of the rule. The provisions of section 205 do not apply when they are inconsistent with applicable law. Moreover, section 205 allows EPA to adopt an alternative other than the least costly, most cost-effective, or least burdensome alternative if the Administrator publishes with the final rule an explanation of why such an alternative was adopted.

Before EPA establishes any regulatory requirements that may significantly or uniquely affect small governments, including tribal governments, it must have developed under section 203 of the UMRA a small government agency plan. The plan must provide for notifying potentially affected small governments, enabling officials of affected small governments to have meaningful and timely input in the development of EPA regulatory proposals with significant federal intergovernmental mandates, and informing, educating, and advising small governments on compliance with the regulatory requirements.

This rule contains no federal mandates for state, local, tribal governments, or the private sector as defined by the provisions of Title II of the UMRA. The rule imposes no enforceable duties on any of these governmental entities. This rule contains no regulatory requirements that would significantly or uniquely affect small governments. EPA has determined that this rule contains no federal mandates that may result in expenditures of more than $100 million to the private sector in any single year. This direct final rule merely changes the regulatory schedule for a rulemaking to address emissions from Category 3 marine engines. This rule is not subject to the requirements of sections 202 and 205 of UMRA.

E. Executive Order 13132: Federalism

Executive Order 13132, entitled “Federalism” (64 FR 43255, August 10, 1999), requires EPA to develop an accountable process to ensure “meaningful and timely input by State and local officials in the development of regulatory policies that have federalism implications.” “Policies that have federalism implications” are defined in the Executive Order to include regulations that have “substantial direct effects on the States, on the relationship between the national government and the States, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government.”

Under Section 6 of Executive Order 13132, EPA may not issue a regulation that has federalism implications, that imposes substantial direct compliance costs, and that is not required by statute, unless the Federal government provides the funds necessary to pay the direct compliance costs incurred by State and local governments, or EPA consults with State and local officials early in the process of developing the regulation. EPA also may not issue a regulation that has federalism implications and that preempts State law, unless the Agency consults with State and local officials early in the process of developing the regulation.

Section 4 of the Executive Order contains additional requirements for rules that preempt State or local law, even if those rules do not have federalism implications (i.e., the rules will not have substantial direct effects on the States, on the relationship between the national government and the states, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government). Those requirements include providing all affected State and local officials notice and an opportunity for appropriate participation in the development of the regulation. If the preemption is not based on express or implied statutory authority, EPA also must consult, to the extent practicable, with appropriate State and local officials regarding the conflict between State law and Federally protected interests within the agency's area of regulatory responsibility.

This rule does not have federalism implications. It will not have substantial direct effects on the States, on the relationship between the national government and the States, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government, as specified in Executive Order 13132. This direct final rule merely changes the regulatory schedule for a rulemaking to address emissions from Category 3 marine engines. Thus, Executive Order 1312 does not apply to this rule.

F. Executive Order 13175: Consultation and Coordination With Indian Tribal Governments

Executive Order 13175, entitled “Consultation and Coordination With Indian Tribal Governments” (59 FR 22951, November 6, 2000), requires EPA to develop an accountable process to ensure “meaningful and timely input by tribal officials in the development of regulatory policies that have tribal implications.” “Policies that have tribal implications” is defined in the Executive Order to include regulations that have “substantial direct effects on one or more Indian tribes, on the relationship between the Federal government and the Indian tribes, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities between the Federal government and Indian tribes.”

This rule does not have tribal implications. It will not have substantial direct effects on tribal governments, on the relationship between the Federal government and Indian tribes, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities between the Federal government and Indian tribes, as specified in Executive Order 13175. This rule does not uniquely affect the communities of Indian Tribal Governments. Further, no circumstances specific to such communities exist that would cause an impact on these communities beyond those discussed in the other sections of this rule. This direct final rule merely changes the regulatory schedule for a rulemaking to address emissions from Category 3 marine engines. Thus, Executive Order 13175 does not apply to this rule.

G. Executive Order 13045: Protection of Children From Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks

Executive Order 13045, “Protection of Children From Environmental Health Start Printed Page 20952Risks and Safety Risks” (62 FR 19885, April 23, 1997) applies to any rule that (1) is determined to be “economically significant” as defined under Executive Order 12866, and (2) concerns an environmental health or safety risk that EPA has reason to believe may have a disproportionate effect on children. If the regulatory action meets both criteria, Section 5-501 of the Order directs the Agency to evaluate the environmental health or safety effects of the planned rule on children, and explain why the planned regulation is preferable to other potentially effective and reasonably feasible alternatives considered by the Agency.

This rule is not subject to the Executive Order because it is not economically significant as defined in EO 12866, and because the Agency does not have reason to believe the environmental health or safety risks addressed by this action present a disproportionate risk to children. This direct final rule merely changes the regulatory schedule for a rulemaking to address emissions from Category 3 marine engines.

H. Executive Order 13211: Actions That Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use

This rule is not a “significant energy action” as defined in Executive Order 13211, “Actions Concerning Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use” (66 FR 28355, May 22, 2001) because it is not likely to have a significant adverse effect on the supply, distribution or use of energy. This direct final rule merely changes the regulatory schedule for a rulemaking to address emissions from Category 3 marine engines.

I. National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act

Section 12(d) of the National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act of 1995 (“NTTAA”), Public Law 104-113, section 12(d) (15 U.S.C. 272 note) directs EPA to use voluntary consensus standards in its regulatory activities unless doing so would be inconsistent with applicable law or otherwise impractical. Voluntary consensus standards are technical standards (such as materials specifications, test methods, sampling procedures, and business practices) that are developed or adopted by voluntary consensus standards bodies. NTTAA directs EPA to provide Congress, through OMB, explanations when the Agency decides not to use available and applicable voluntary consensus standards.

This direct final rule does not involve technical standards. This direct final rule merely changes the regulatory schedule for a rulemaking to address emissions from Category 3 marine engines. Therefore, EPA did not consider the use of any voluntary consensus standards.

J. Executive Order 12898: Federal Actions To Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations

Executive Order (EO) 12898 (59 FR 7629 (Feb. 16, 1994)) establishes federal executive policy on environmental justice. Its main provision directs federal agencies, to the greatest extent practicable and permitted by law, to make environmental justice part of their mission by identifying and addressing, as appropriate, disproportionately high and adverse human health or environmental effects of their programs, policies, and activities on minority populations and low-income populations in the United States.

EPA has determined that this rule will not have disproportionately high and adverse human health or environmental effects on minority or low-income populations because it does not affect the level of protection provided to human health or the environment. This direct final rule merely changes the regulatory schedule for a rulemaking to address emissions from Category 3 marine engines.

K. Congressional Review Act

The Congressional Review Act, 5 U.S.C. 801 et seq., as amended by the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act of 1996, generally provides that before a rule may take effect, the agency promulgating the rule must submit a rule report, which includes a copy of the rule, to Congress and the Comptroller General of the United States. We will submit a report containing this rule and other required information to the U.S. Senate, the U.S. House of Representatives, and the Comptroller General of the United States before publication of the rule in the Federal Register. A major rule cannot take effect until 60 days after it is published in the Federal Register. This action is not a “major rule” as defined by 5 U.S.C. 804(2). This direct final rule is effective on June 26, 2007.

L. Statutory Authority

The statutory authority for this action comes from section 213 of the Clean Air Act as amended (42 U.S.C. 7547). This action is a rulemaking subject to the provisions of Clean Air Act section 307(d). See 42 U.S.C. 7607(d).

Start List of Subjects

List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 94

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Dated: April 23, 2007.

Stephen L. Johnson,

Administrator.

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For the reasons set out in the preamble, title 40, chapter I of the Code of Federal Regulations is amended as follows:

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PART 94—CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM MARINE COMPRESSION-IGNITION EMISSIONS

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1. The authority citation for part 94 continues to read as follows:

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Authority: 42 U.S.C. 7401-7671q.

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2. Section 94.8 is amended by revising paragraph (a)(2)(ii) to read as follows:

End Amendment Part
Exhaust emission standards.

(a) * * *

(2) * * *

(ii) EPA has not finalized Tier 2 standards for Category 3 engines. EPA will promulgate final Tier 2 standards for Category 3 engines on or before December 17, 2009.

* * * * *
End Supplemental Information

Footnotes

1.  “Control of Emissions from New Marine Compression-Ignition Engines at or Above 30 Liters Per Cylinder; Final Rule,” 68 FR 9746, February 28, 2003.

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2.  “Revision of MARPOL Annex VI, The NOX Technical Code and Related Guidelines; Development of Standards for NOX, PM, and SOX,” submitted by the United States to the Sub-Committee on Bulk Liquids and Gases, 11th Session, 2007.

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[FR Doc. E7-8105 Filed 4-26-07; 8:45 am]

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