Skip to Content

Notice

Government-Owned Inventions; Availability for Licensing

Document Details

Information about this document as published in the Federal Register.

Published Document

This document has been published in the Federal Register. Use the PDF linked in the document sidebar for the official electronic format.

Start Preamble

AGENCY:

National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service, HHS.

ACTION:

Notice.

SUMMARY:

The inventions listed below are owned by an agency of the U.S. Government and are available for licensing in the U.S. in accordance with 35 U.S.C. 207 to achieve expeditious commercialization of results of federally-funded research and development. Foreign patent applications are filed on selected inventions to extend market coverage for companies and may also be available for licensing.

ADDRESSES:

Licensing information and copies of the U.S. patent applications listed below may be obtained by writing to the indicated licensing contact at the Office of Technology Transfer, National Institutes of Health, 6011 Executive Boulevard, Suite 325, Rockville, Maryland 20852-3804; telephone: 301/496-7057; fax: 301/402-0220. A signed Confidential Disclosure Agreement will be required to receive copies of the patent applications.

Development of Dengue Virus Type 3 Vaccine Candidates Containing Either 1) Nucleotide Deletions in the 3′-UTR of the Genome Consisting of More Than 30 Contiguous Nucleotides in One or Multiple Regions, or 2) a 3′-UTR Derived From DEN4 and Containing the A30 Nucleotide Deletion

Description of Technology: The disease burden associated with dengue virus infection has increased over the past several decades in the tropical and semi-tropical regions of the world, where over 2 billion people live at risk of dengue infection. Annually, there are an estimated fifty (50) to one hundred (100) million cases of dengue fever, making development of an effective vaccine a priority. In addition, there is a need for a “travelers vaccine” to protect those visiting dengue virus endemic areas, similar in scope to other currently available “travelers vaccines”, such as hepatitis A vaccine.

The previously identified Δ30 attenuating mutation, created in each dengue virus serotype by the removal of 30 homologous nucleotides from the 3′-UTR, is capable of attenuating wild-type strains of dengue virus type 1 (DEN1), type 4 (DEN4) and to a limited extent type 2 (DEN2). These DEN1Δ30 and Start Printed Page 43285DEN4Δ30 viruses have been shown to be both safe and immunogenic in humans. However, the Δ30 mutation failed to have an attenuating effect on dengue virus type 3 (DEN3). To generate DEN3 vaccine candidates with a clearly attenuated phenotype, viruses were produced containing 3′-UTR deletions consisting of extensions of the original Δ30 mutation or additional mutations which remove stem-loop structures similar to those removed by Δ30. In addition, the entire 3′-UTR of DEN3 was replaced with the 3′-UTR derived from DEN4 and containing the Δ30 mutation. Studies in monkeys demonstrated that these newly developed viruses are highly attenuated, yet sufficiently immunogenic to warrant their further development for use as live attenuated vaccine candidates. Such viruses are anticipated to become the DEN3 component of a tetravalent vaccine formulation designed to immunize against all four dengue virus serotypes.

Application: Immunization against all four serotypes of Dengue Virus.

Developmental Status: Vaccine candidates have been synthesized and preclinical studies have been performed. The vaccine candidates of this invention are slated to enter Phase I clinical trials in the next year.

Inventors: Stephen S. Whitehead, Joseph E. Blaney, Brian R. Murphy (NIAID).

Patent Status: U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/837,723 filed 15 Aug. 2006 (HHS Reference No. E-139-2006/0-US-01).

Licensing Status: Available for exclusive or non-exclusive licensing.

Licensing Contact: Peter A. Soukas, J.D.; 301/435-4646; soukasp@mail.nih.gov

Collaborative Research Opportunity: The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Laboratory of Infectious Diseases, is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize these vaccines. Please contact Dr. Brian Murphy at 301-594-1616 or bm25f@nih.gov for more information.

Dengue Tetravalent Vaccine Containing a Common 30-Nucleotide Deletion in the 3′-UTR of Dengue Types 1, 2, 3, and 4

Description of Technology: The invention relates to a dengue virus tetravalent vaccine containing a common 30-nucleotide deletion (Δ30) in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of the genome of dengue virus serotypes 1, 2, 3, and 4. The previously identified Δ30 attenuating mutation, created in dengue virus type 4 (DEN4) by the removal of 30 nucleotides from the 3′-UTR, is also capable of attenuating a wild-type strain of dengue virus type 1 (DEN1). Removal of 30 nucleotides from the DEN1 3′-UTR in a highly conserved region homologous to the DEN4 region encompassing the Δ30 mutation yielded a recombinant virus attenuated in rhesus monkeys to a level similar to recombinant virus DEN4Δ30. This established the transportability of the Δ30 mutation and its attenuation phenotype to a dengue virus type other than DEN4. The effective transferability of the Δ30 mutation establishes the usefulness of the Δ30 mutation to attenuate and improve the safety of commercializable dengue virus vaccines of any serotype.

A tetravalent dengue virus vaccine containing dengue virus types 1, 2, 3, and 4 each attenuated by the Δ30 mutation is being developed. The presence of the Δ30 attenuating mutation in each virus component precludes the reversion to a wild-type virus by intertypic recombination. In addition, because of the inherent genetic stability of deletion mutations, the Δ30 mutation represents an excellent alternative for use as a common mutation shared among each component of a tetravalent vaccine.

Inventors: Stephen S. Whitehead (NIAID), Brian R. Murphy (NIAID), Lewis Markoff (FDA), Barry Falgout (FDA), Kathryn A. Hanley (NIAID), Joseph E. Blaney (NIAID).

Patent Status: U.S. Patent Application No. 10/970,640 filed 21 Oct. 2004, claiming priority to 03 May 2002 (HHS Reference No. E-089-2002/1-US-02).

Licensing Contact: Peter A. Soukas, J.D.; 301/435-4646; soukasp@mail.nih.gov.

Collaborative Research Opportunity: The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Laboratory of Infectious Diseases, is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize these vaccines. Please contact Dr. Brian Murphy at 301-594-1616 or bm25f@nih.gov for more information.

Development of Mutations Useful for Attenuating Dengue Viruses and Chimeric Dengue Viruses

Description of Technology: Although flaviviruses cause a great deal of human suffering and economic loss, there is a shortage of effective vaccines. This invention relates to dengue virus mutations that may contribute to the development of improved dengue vaccines. Site directed and random mutagenesis techniques were used to introduce mutations into the dengue virus genome and to assemble a collection of useful mutations for incorporation in recombinant live attenuated dengue virus vaccines. The resulting mutant viruses were screened for several valuable phenotypes, including temperature sensitivity in Vero cells or human liver cells, host cell restriction in mosquito cells or human liver cells, host cell adaptation for improved replication in Vero cells, and attenuation in mice or in mosquitoes. The genetic basis for each observed phenotype was determined by direct sequence analysis of the genome of the mutant virus. Mutations identified through these sequencing efforts have been further evaluated by re-introduction of the identified mutations, singly, or in combination, into recombinant dengue virus and characterization of the resulting recombinant virus for phenotypes. In this manner, a menu of attenuating and growth promoting mutations was developed that is useful in fine-tuning the attenuation and growth characteristics of dengue virus vaccine candidates. The mutations promoting growth in Vero cells have usefulness for the production of live or inactivated dengue virus vaccines.

Inventors: Stephen S. Whitehead, Brian R. Murphy, Kathryn A. Hanley, Joseph E. Blaney (NIAID).

Patent Status: U.S. Patent No. 7,226,602 issued 05 Jun 2007 (HHS Reference No. E-120-2001/0-US-04); U.S. Patent Application No. 11/446,050 filed 02 Jun 2006 (HHS Reference No. E-120-2001/0-US-10).

Licensing Contact: Peter A. Soukas, J.D.; 301/435-4646; soukasp@mail.nih.gov.

Collaborative Research Opportunity: The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Laboratory of Infectious Diseases, is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize these vaccines. Please contact Dr. Brian Murphy at 301-594-1616 or bm25f@nih.gov for more information.

Start Signature

Dated: July 27, 2007.

Steven M. Ferguson,

Director, Division of Technology Development and Transfer, Office of Technology Transfer, National Institutes of Health.

End Signature End Preamble

[FR Doc. E7-15054 Filed 8-2-07; 8:45 am]

BILLING CODE 4140-01-P